Will your e-bike still function in 10 years?

I am UK based to tend to not look/read non UK comments, sorry.

But when I considered getting my Sanderson life framed bike converted and my Saracen there were serious questions I asked before spending £1,800 on two conversions.

1. Will a battery be available down the years, and NO not for built in proprietary ones that change design, whilst down frame ones will.
2. Which system is best for daily use, MID drive, when I get a puncture I want to take the wheel off easy, NOT struggle with bolts, electric cables in the wet/rain/cold with front or rear drives.

Simples. :) :)
 
I'm not really worried if my Engwe Pro is still working or parts are available .
I'm 80 and like other comments ,that will be the least of my worries .
Good Forum Subject though .
After getting this e-bike on my 80th birthday ,my legs and knees haven't felt as good in a long long time :giggle:
Lots a heathy fun and cheaper than a girlfriend :oops:
 
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The DIY community has an advantage: they convert their analog bikes into e-bikes. The battery is mounted outside the frame. If the motor or battery fails, they find parts and repair their motors as needed and the battery is much more easily replaced. Many of these motors, like the Bafang BBSHD or the CYC X1 Pro, can be connected to any battery as long as the watts/volts/amps specifications are compatible.
One of the reasons I did a CYC Photon, it will run until I decide it is not worth maintaining. I can then put on whatever makes sense at the time.

Battery? If it puts out 32 to 72v, and has a positive and negative wire, I am good. Convert to XT90, find a place to mount it or toss in the top of rack bag. Done.

The frame will likely last 20+, which would put me at 70+... I am good with that. All other parts are off the shelf.
 

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Do you drive a 10 year old car?
I have no intention of keeping my ebike that long. Which, of course, creates another problem - ewaste.
Technology will continue to improve, prices will continue to drop, and, of course, marketing will insist we replace old with new.
At some point, I'm sure I will.
 
Do you drive a 10 year old car?
I have no intention of keeping my ebike that long. Which, of course, creates another problem - ewaste.
Technology will continue to improve, prices will continue to drop, and, of course, marketing will insist we replace old with new.
At some point, I'm sure I will.
Well... yes. 3 of them. Nissian Leaf, 2012, and GMC terrain 2012, and BMW 2013 700GS

Plus the 75 CB550 and a 77 Vespa P200.

I got 1 new car... 2022 I bought used.
 
Well... yes. 3 of them. Nissian Leaf, 2012, and GMC terrain 2012, and BMW 2013 700GS

Plus the 75 CB550 and a 77 Vespa P200.

I got 1 new car... 2022 I bought used.
Which taught you what to look for in your next EV, SUV and sports car (and garage), should you get one.
I've learned a lot in my two years with my first ebike, and I'm in no rush to get rid of it. But the next one will be a little different (and probably at least twice as expensive), and it won't take me eight years to get it.
 
Perhaps I would be more inclined if it had been an expensive ebike (though there is still rather a gap between even an expensive ebike and a car), but it wasn't THAT expensive (though certainly not disposable). Now that I know how much I enjoy it, the next one will very likely be more expensive.
The question, though, was if it will still FUNCTION after ten years. I would be very pleasantly surprised if it does, and it won't bother me if it doesn't. After all, after a while, some things are disposable.
 
Actually, the car I currently drive is 11 years old and still going strong. I think you are underestimating how many people hold onto expensive items for as long as possible.
True. However, "10 years" as in the original post is not set in stone. It means having to throw the ebike away before its natural end of life, because after a few years you won't be able to find spare parts.

E-bikes are still a relatively new product. Once the market is saturated, there are two options for manufacturers: produce more powerful, affordable ebikes with attractive new features, or just try to squeeze money out of customers by refusing to provide support. A law in this direction might help.
 
This customer stupidity thing again @ElHepgah?:LOL:

In EU, the 2021 law called "Right to Repair" guarantees spare parts for at least 10 years for many categories of household appliances. A similar law applies to cars. Why not to e-bikes?
 
This customer stupidity thing again @ElHepgah?:LOL:

In EU, the 2021 law called "Right to Repair" guarantees spare parts for at least 10 years for many categories of household appliances. A similar law applies to cars. Why not to e-bikes?

Because they are seen as toys.
 
I don't think so, @Superb_Raccoon. In many European countries they are now seen as one of the main means of transport. I think it is more a question of time. E-bikes are still more of a fringe market, but growing: https://www.forbes.com/sites/carlto...-per-year-by-2030-forecast-industry-experts/#

And this is without including possible breakthroughs, such as the deployment of battery technologies that make them much cheaper, safer and lighter, or significantly higher performing (much extended range). If it will be possible in 10 years to improve the energy density of rechargeable batteries (Wh/Kg) by a factor of 2, which is what HAS HAPPENED between 2013 and today without most of people noticing, or by halving their cost ($/Wh), their diffusion could grow even more!

Bike sales.
 
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