Unsure what would work, given my needs

SpectreofChaos

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Hey, new to all of this, and I have a lot of specific things I am after in an Ebike in order to fit my needs/desires. I am not even sure that there is something that would work, but I love the idea of it. So, starting out, I'm disabled and 330lbs. So they are serious limits, I know. Had multiple spine surgeries, gained weight from physical inactivity, and here we are. I like the idea of a bike that can also get me home if the pain gets too high and I can't pedal/at least have an assist. Why would I ride a bike if I may just get stranded due to pain? Ebikes may be my answer.

A little about my desires for the bike itself and its role: I'm looking for something similar to a dirtbike/dual sport in capability. Range is needed, preferably 70 miles or more. I already know that ain't cheap, nor on the beginner tier. This may end up being a buy once cry once ordeal, so I'm swinging for the fences, see what reality has to say. I may be dreaming about what I want. I'm in PA, so I planned on driving both roads and then into the mountains on the paths I used to fourwheel on. So I'd say good torque, range, and speed are needed. I initially saw the CAB Motorworks Recon, but the price with add-ons quickly goes crazy. But the idea of it makes me feel it may be possible to find something I could use.

I also hoped to be able to have it carry some supplies, like on a Mosko Reckless or similar. But as far as I have seen, not much in the way of carry capacity out there for ebikes. I'm not even sure that Mosko would work, even being a rackless design. So does anyone use theirs to go out in the woods and camp from it?

So overall, I assume with my weight alone I will need something high output. Power and torque. I also need a solid battery, able to either go long distances or support off road travel. I have seen Enduro Ebikes, and some of the higher end 12000w seems likely the area I'd need to look towards. Pricey, especially for my initial foray into Ebikes. But with what I want to do and my health issues, I am not sure what else would be capable.

Sorry for the length, I looked for something similar, but felt my situation specific enough to need a lengthy, mind numbing, sleep inducing description. I'm not looking at an immediate buy either, so I have time before I pull the trigger on this. I have also seen bike kits, but I have never done something that complex. I love the idea of it, as I love knowing what I am using and how to work on it. But just walking into this, the options for that are all over the place, and I need more knowledge before I could attempt builting it, let alone just choosing the parts needed.

Thanks for your time. I've been looking for months on my own, but decided I definitely need advice. Thanks again.
 
This is the closest I have seen they use motorcycle tires but their capacity is still only 265lbs You might talk to them, maybe they could beef up the rear suspension for you. The tires would probably be rated high enough.

 
There are a bunch of ebike companies that make bikes which will suit your weight requirements. You're probably looking at 5,000-7,000, maybe more depending on how you configure the bike. They're marketed to hunters who want a way to carry their gear further in and be quiet about it.

If you build your own you need to find the right bike and then choose a motor/battery combo. It can be way more economical. Plus you get the luxury of programming the pedal assist to your needs and being able to operate the bike with only a throttle if you wanted. I converted a hardtail which I already owned a for about 2,400, but I upgraded some of the lesser components of the kit. I'm really happy with the results, and I would probably purchase a conversion kit if I were doing what you're after. Buy the highest wattage motor your local laws allow or what you are comfortable having. 750W -1000W are pretty good for most people. Add to that the biggest battery you can fit on your bike to reach the specs you stated.

You'll need to consider the types of roads and hilliness of the terrain you will be riding on the most and try to select the right bike frame and wheel size. I would look and the cruiser style big tire bikes which will likely be more comfortable on your spine. If you build your own...a full suspension bike would be sweet, but it's harder to find a good spot for the larger batteries in those types of frames. There are ways to do it, like with rear tire painner frames and cargo racks.

Also after riding an ebike you converted yourself, you get an excellent lesson in how to maintain the bike you just built. Those are skills that can save you a lot of time and money at the shops. There aren't a lot of bike shops in my area, and the one there is, is not that comfortable working on the motor components of a DIY ebike build. Always things to consider.
 
I like the idea of building myself for sure. I haven't ever built something that had electrical components. That's my main concern, electrical issues and lack of knowledge worry me. I have seen some Ebikes catch fire, but from what I saw a lot were thought to be some crap batteries.

I think I heard that hub motor setups would be better for me, as if the chain breaks, the motor can still work as throttle only, so I could still make it back. Whereas a mid frame setup would be out of commission if the chain breaks. Does that sound accurate?

I had not even heard of the full suspension bike frames. Interesting, and may be a better idea for my back. I had planned on putting a good bit towards solid suspension for that reason anyhow.

I may ask as a totally separate post about this, but I have heard that some people have gotten ebikes covered under health insurance as therapy devices. I don't think they would cover what I am after, but figured I'd ask if anyone had heard about it.
 
I like the idea of building myself for sure. I haven't ever built something that had electrical components. That's my main concern, electrical issues and lack of knowledge worry me. I have seen some Ebikes catch fire, but from what I saw a lot were thought to be some crap batteries.

I think I heard that hub motor setups would be better for me, as if the chain breaks, the motor can still work as throttle only, so I could still make it back. Whereas a mid frame setup would be out of commission if the chain breaks. Does that sound accurate?

I had not even heard of the full suspension bike frames. Interesting, and may be a better idea for my back. I had planned on putting a good bit towards solid suspension for that reason anyhow.

I may ask as a totally separate post about this, but I have heard that some people have gotten ebikes covered under health insurance as therapy devices. I don't think they would cover what I am after, but figured I'd ask if anyone had heard about it.
I'm not sure about the insurance thing, but given the history with your back and the cost of a sweet ebike, it may be worth a shot.

I built an ebike with a mid drive motor and carry a spare chain in case the one I am using breaks. That seems to make me feel better. I have about 600 hard miles on my bike and no chain issues yet. I don't have any experience with hub assemblies as far as function. I went with the mid drive because it seemed like the better motor for my uses. Based on your criteria, most factory bikes you find that meet your list will be mid drive motors. What you're looking for in range is at the top end of battery capacity. Some factory bike frames have 2 high capacity batteries, so they can give the distance you want. Mine is a single 52v 17.5 ah. I haven't completely run out of battery yet so I dont know the true range of it. I have ridden 20 miles on it without pedaling, traveling in hilly terrain. I rode 20 last weekend where I peddled hard for the first 10 and cruised home throttle only at 20_30 mph. My batt was at 75% when I was done.

For do it yourself bikes: I purchased a bafang mid drive motor. There weren't any complicated electrical connections or components. Everything plugs in in special connections. So don't let that turn you off, but I have done my own bike maintenance for ever so it didn't seem like too big of a task. You'll need some tools and patience. It took me a few days to do the conversion, but now I could do it in 1 day easy if I had everything.

You'll probably have the most comfort on something like Quietkat or Biktrix make. Check out their websites. If you buy your own bike to convert, make sure the frame is the right size for your body. They come in Sm, med, large, xl so find out what size rider the manufacturer intended to use for that size frame. The kinds of miles you're talking about will require dialed in comfort. You won't want to be in a mountain bike posture for that long. The upright posture you find in a cruiser style would probably be best for you. Depends on what makes your back most comfortable.

There are also seat post shock absorbers if you dont get a full suspension bike. I use a Thudbuster made by a company called Cane Creek. Totally takes the edge off the bumps.

Battery fires are super scary and a real thing. If you buy a motor/battery kit, buy from a reputable dealer. If the battery is made to standards and not damaged the risk is minimal. Also don't leave them plugged in forever and if you're concerned, don't charge them overnight. A good battery can cost as much or more than the motor, but you'll be amazed at how far that batt can take you!
 
1) What is your budget?
2) How tall are you?

Hey, new to all of this, and I have a lot of specific things I am after in an Ebike in order to fit my needs/desires. I am not even sure that there is something that would work, but I love the idea of it. So, starting out, I'm disabled and 330lbs. So they are serious limits, I know. Had multiple spine surgeries, gained weight from physical inactivity, and here we are. I like the idea of a bike that can also get me home if the pain gets too high and I can't pedal/at least have an assist. Why would I ride a bike if I may just get stranded due to pain? Ebikes may be my answer.

A little about my desires for the bike itself and its role: I'm looking for something similar to a dirtbike/dual sport in capability. Range is needed, preferably 70 miles or more.
This is going to be the killer. The only way you're going to get that is if you do a lot of the work yourself and use the electric power sparingly. There are a lot of bikes you might like that advertise 70 mile range, but that's with the fine print that it is on the lowest power assist setting, with the assumption that you're of average weight and are doing much of the work.

If you were to get a full suspension off-road bike, your weight will likely be a problem for the suspension. You would likely crank the shock preload all the way up and still find that it bottoms out easily.

I already know that ain't cheap, nor on the beginner tier. This may end up being a buy once cry once ordeal, so I'm swinging for the fences, see what reality has to say. I may be dreaming about what I want. I'm in PA, so I planned on driving both roads and then into the mountains on the paths I used to fourwheel on. So I'd say good torque, range, and speed are needed. I initially saw the CAB Motorworks Recon, but the price with add-ons quickly goes crazy. But the idea of it makes me feel it may be possible to find something I could use.

I also hoped to be able to have it carry some supplies, like on a Mosko Reckless or similar. But as far as I have seen, not much in the way of carry capacity out there for ebikes. I'm not even sure that Mosko would work, even being a rackless design. So does anyone use theirs to go out in the woods and camp from it?
Never heard of Mosko; I'd avoid them.


So overall, I assume with my weight alone I will need something high output. Power and torque. I also need a solid battery, able to either go long distances or support off road travel. I have seen Enduro Ebikes, and some of the higher end 12000w seems likely the area I'd need to look towards. Pricey, especially for my initial foray into Ebikes. But with what I want to do and my health issues, I am not sure what else would be capable.
Remember that a 750 W steady is the limit of what is street legal as an eBike. Above that and it is off-road legal only. I agree that you do want something torquey, but you don't need 12 kW unless you're wanting to go 40+ mph. (and you don't, unless you're geared up with motorcycle-class safety gear and have experience, believe me as a retired motorcyclist)

Sorry for the length, I looked for something similar, but felt my situation specific enough to need a lengthy, mind numbing, sleep inducing description. I'm not looking at an immediate buy either, so I have time before I pull the trigger on this. I have also seen bike kits, but I have never done something that complex. I love the idea of it, as I love knowing what I am using and how to work on it. But just walking into this, the options for that are all over the place, and I need more knowledge before I could attempt builting it, let alone just choosing the parts needed.

Thanks for your time. I've been looking for months on my own, but decided I definitely need advice. Thanks again.
If I were you, I'd look at these two, to start:

This is not what you were imagining, but bear with me.

That one carries as much cargo as you're likely to ever need. The tires are wide enough to handle gravel or dirt roads, but are not knobby. Not for knarly single track. You could put knobbies on, if you want to give up some range due to lower aerodynamic efficiency. It has dual batteries for great range and a torquey 750 W motor. Take a look at the accessories; impressive. Lectric has realistic range tables too; scroll down and read the fine print. (which is reasonable)

*************

This one saves several hundred dollars, but your stated use would be pushing the limits of the bike:

It does come with knobbies. The frame folds, so you can load it into your car and go somewhere; don't have to ride the entire way. (take note of the bike weight though; they're not easy to lift) That helps, as the range is more limited than the Expedition above. (65 miles under ideal conditions) You could buy and bring an extra battery with you. Total payload is 330 lbs. right at your limit. If you load it up and beat on it offroad, you'll probably break it.

****************
One of the the things I love about my eBikes is the ability to carry reasonably heavy cargo without making it harder to pedal.

Don't fall into the trap of going for maximum power. That necessitates a heavy bike, which requires more power and battery too. It's a never-ending loop. For example, 70 miles is a LONG ride. Are you really going to be going 70 miles at a stretch without ability to recharge along the way?
 
I'm 5'9. Budget is in flux, but if everything works out, I'd say I could go around 8k, after that I'd have to get some really big performance jumps to warrant further expenditures. Unless I can get insurance to cover it. Months of physical therapy plus possible in home equipment, or an expensive one time cost of an ebike? But when has insurance made sense and worked to get people healthier? Sorry, I'm bitter haha.

Mosko was a brand for dirt bike gear storage, not a bike manufacturer itself. Not sure if I made that clear. I believe other companies have similar rigs, that was just one I remembered top of my head. It would have to have a more dirtbike style seat though to work, and even then, it seems ebike dirtbike style seats are far shorter than dirtbikes themselves.

The 70 mile range is a safety net. I anticipate being able to charge inbetween, but can't guarantee it. And I always like to prepare for the worst, as I usually find it. I plan to use the pedal assist as much as possible, as I am really after some weight loss and core strengthening. If I go to the areas I want, Id say probably 30 miles there, 30 back, including some riding when I get there. That's the thought at least.

I was mainly looking at enduroebikes.com and their 12000w enduro ebike, before I looked deeper and found there may be all sorts of options I hadn't even seen. But that's where my brain was before I started looking deeper and realized I may be trapping myself in a box, and need to look into a more custom build that fits me better.

I do appreciate the help. Mobility has been hard with the surgeries, and this really seems like it could help me just get out, let alone lose the weight from being laid up so much. A new spine would be better, but taking what I can get.
 
You might be better off starting out more slowly, (10-20 miles, smooth surfaces). That would help to condition you for riding further and may help you to reach your desired weight. The enduro bikes tend to be more an electric motorbike than an ebike that provides a good pedaling experience.

An additional consideration is wheel strength. Many wheels have a much lower weight limit, but fortunately, there are wheels that are built for tandem and cargo bikes that can handle the extra weight.

Stresses on the frame, wheels, tires and components increase when riding off road as well. Failure of a seat post, wheel or frame can at best leave you stranded, and at worst…..

That’s not to say that you shouldn’t buy the bike that will meet your future needs. It’s just that we all had to walk before we could run.
 
30 miles, at 10 mph that's 3 hours non-stop. 15 mph, non-stop pedaling, that's 90 minutes.
If you have not been pedaling for 90 minutes non-stop before, that is a lot of time in the saddle.
Even at 30 mph, that's one solid hour of pedaling to reach destination 30 miles away with no stops.

For an ebike capable of carrying 330 lb. rider, plus cargo, to travel 30 miles at 20 mph on one charge, that would require a decent size battery & motor output.

With the Lectric XPedition & XP 3.0 long range, likely the least costly ways to try whether it's realistic for you to ride 30 miles, non-stop for one hour plus.
 
I'm 5'9. Budget is in flux, but if everything works out, I'd say I could go around 8k, after that I'd have to get some really big performance jumps to warrant further expenditures. Unless I can get insurance to cover it. Months of physical therapy plus possible in home equipment, or an expensive one time cost of an ebike? But when has insurance made sense and worked to get people healthier? Sorry, I'm bitter haha.

Mosko was a brand for dirt bike gear storage, not a bike manufacturer itself. Not sure if I made that clear. I believe other companies have similar rigs, that was just one I remembered top of my head. It would have to have a more dirtbike style seat though to work, and even then, it seems ebike dirtbike style seats are far shorter than dirtbikes themselves.

The 70 mile range is a safety net. I anticipate being able to charge inbetween, but can't guarantee it. And I always like to prepare for the worst, as I usually find it. I plan to use the pedal assist as much as possible, as I am really after some weight loss and core strengthening. If I go to the areas I want, Id say probably 30 miles there, 30 back, including some riding when I get there. That's the thought at least.

I was mainly looking at enduroebikes.com and their 12000w enduro ebike, before I looked deeper and found there may be all sorts of options I hadn't even seen. But that's where my brain was before I started looking deeper and realized I may be trapping myself in a box, and need to look into a more custom build that fits me better.

I do appreciate the help. Mobility has been hard with the surgeries, and this really seems like it could help me just get out, let alone lose the weight from being laid up so much. A new spine would be better, but taking what I can get.
Get the Lectric Expedition with the additional battery pack. It sounds like it really is perfect for your needs right now.
  • It has enough torque and battery capacity to haul you around as you get into shape
  • It has serious cargo capacity
  • It is built for your weight (wheels, frame, integral rack, etc.)
  • It has the range you want (and with your budget, you could add another battery pack as part of your cargo for a really long ride...)
Django made some good points too. Start smaller; take it slow and see how it goes.

As for the saddle, you can get the Giant Seat option and if that's not supportive enough, I can recommend one on Amazon that will be.

The Orbitor is kind of a combo child carrier that doubles as a heavy-duty cargo basket. It also works with the XL Cargo Pannier Bags:
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Get the second charger for $50, so you can charge both battery packs at once when you get back from a long ride and want to do more riding the next day:
1690917385586.png
 
I have been known to skydive before I walk, so it all makes sense. I usually go for the worst, then work my way back. I always worry I'll pen myself in if I start too low, surpass that level of need, but then be stuck with what I have, so I overcompensate and go balls to the wall. No one I know really has any understanding of an Ebike, so having them keep my... Enthusiasm we will say... In check. Heck, hard for them even when they do have a handle on the situation.

That Lectric is surprisingly close to everything I am after. I am one for modularity, again, hate being penned in. And even if I get my weight down, which currently it is dropping, it isn't so much of a cost that kills going after something else later. I like it.

Also gives me time to build one. Still get to ride while I piece together another, learn how to build it. This is gonna become an addiction, isn't it? Eh, worse things in the world.
 
As an addict (for cycling) since my teens; it can get expensive; but there are worse things to be addicted to.
If you want to find out whether you like cycling, start off with small investment that just allows you to be out there riding, spend time in the saddle.
Maybe 15-30 minutes to begin with before you start to develop your "cycling calluses" for longer hours in the saddle.
As you develop more stamina, more strength & lose weight; then decide whether to spend more money in better more expensive, higher performance machines.
If you find out that cycling is not what you'd imagined after pedaling every single day for a month, at least you're not made a huge time & money investment and you've given it a fair try. Key is to do it every single day, even when you're tired.
 
"A" is recommendation caution, but I can't see the Expedition not being a hit. Even if he doesn't "get into cycling" it's going to make an excellent grocery-getter or even electric scooter.

Even if he doesn't lose any weight, it can handle him right now.

When he wants some exercise, he will set a slightly lower power level than he needs and work a bit. Too much? Dial up the power assist.

Maybe go for a pure electric "Guilty Pleasure Ride" now and then.

Other days, he'll be like: "I'm going for it" and maybe not use any juice at all.
 
@SpectreofChaos If you are pretty good with mechanical stuff; DIY, maintenance, repair etc. You might want to look at my Fat Bike build in the build section. I have a Wallke F1 frame which is almost identical to the fat version F2 frame that I load to over 300 pounds and have no issues. For what you want to do I would highly recommend a mid drive motor. The Bafang BBSHD is pretty bullet proof and can be tuned pretty easily with your phone connected to the display.
If your inseam is around 29-30” you would be able to stand over it. It only has a 10.4ah in-frame battery, but it’s pretty easy to add another battery in a frame bag. With the additional battery and the BBSHD set to around 15amps max and the PAS settings (for a starting point) set to what to what forum member m@Robertson has listed on his web page.
You should be able to reach 70 mile range easily.

The cost is not that much.
Wallke F2 ebike. $900
Bafang BBSHD mid drive kit $600
Rear fat freewheel hub to swap out for the hub motor $50
Spokes. $25-$30
Luna eclipse chainring $100
20ah triangle battery $500
Battery bag $30
30a rated dual battery regulator $30
Eggrider v2 display $100

Total $2340

Sell the take-off Bafang 500w motor for $200 easy

If you want hydraulic brakes the Tektro HD-E350 brake set is $120 on Aliexpress.

If this is something you want to do and you can’t find any one to build the rear wheel with the new hub, I’ll do it for $30 labor, plus spoke cost and return shipping.
 
I'm basically waiting for back pay that's been overdue since like 2017 I believe. I planned on this being my one splurge, then everything else goes to some sort of business or similar endeavor to try and get steady enough to get off disability. I'll always be "disabled" as my spine is bad, it wont get better unless tech finally can help, pain will always be there, etc. But I don't want it ruling my life. I remember riding four wheelers as a kid, terror-assing over entire mountain ranges. The freedom was great, and until I saw ebikes, i figured that was gone. This just seems perfect. It'll hurt, but be healthy. I can ride whenever, not just wait for my therapy sessions. Between this and hopefully figuring out a job I can do with limited mobility, I really would like to move off disability and get back to living. What exactly I can go for as work? Still figuring that out. Not a big town here, but maybe I can use the bike for something. Drone operator came to mind, but you have to get certified for any drone endeavor that you make money off of. Sorry, just went off track there. But as you can see, basically trying to rewrite my life from the car accident. I really appreciate y'all helpin out. It'll be a minute before I will be able to get one, but the thought I can get out of here and have some of the freedom I had as a kid is great. I want my life to be lived on my terms. Not just collateral damage of a drunk. I just really appreciate it.

Sorry, lengthy rambling out of the way... I love the idea of building a bike. I love firearms. I break mine down, clean them, reassemble, upgrade, etc. Shooting a target is easy for a rough back, little walking and exertion. So I want the same for whatever I get into, building and tinkering. I think building an ebike would be awesome. I havent dealt with electronics since my old airsoft days working on my AEGs. But only way to learn is to try. And having that knowledge if something goes wrong, hopefully I could fix it myself. It depends on when the money comes. If its gonna be a long time, I'll have to piece it together slowly. It will just postpone when I get to start riding. If the money comes soon, or if my insurance would get one (I have read of several people getting one through insurance, but never stated how they did it or what standards needed to be met) I may buy a completed one like that Lectric, and then build another as I learn more, lose weight, strengthen my core, and basically become an addict and want more.

Hsdrrgr, you mentioned a mid drive motor would be best. Can you explain the benefits? From what I read, hub motors can operate even if the chain breaks, unlikely as it may be. Past that, I have no real knowledge one way or another. Is one better for speed, and one for torque or something?

Again, thank you all for being so willing to help and dealing with my specific issues and long discussions. Rather welcoming community.
 
<snip>
Hsdrrgr, you mentioned a mid drive motor would be best. Can you explain the benefits? From what I read, hub motors can operate even if the chain breaks, unlikely as it may be. Past that, I have no real knowledge one way or another. Is one better for speed, and one for torque or something?
Mid drive has the motor near the bottom bracket, and it is linked in with the chain and sprockets you yourself pedal, so it takes advantage of the bike's gearing, rather than being stuck with whatever gearing is built into the hub motor. It also has the advantage that the rear wheel is a lot easier to uninstall and reinstall, e.g. in case of a flat.

The disadvantages are cost and since so much more power is put into the chain & sprockets, their lifespan is greatly reduced.
Again, thank you all for being so willing to help and dealing with my specific issues and long discussions. Rather welcoming community.
You're welcome! I think I speak for all of us when I saw we're pulling for you.
One thing you can do now in preparation for That Fateful Day is to fix your diet and start getting some exercise, even if it's just walking or riding your acoustic bike slowly, starting out with short distances.

I have a long-time friend (31 years now!) who has always struggled with obesity and I'm getting him roped back into exercising. He's probably 6'1 and 275 lbs. He's walking with his wife twice a day and cycling every other day or so. He acknowledges he's not ready to go on group rides with me yet. He's winded after a 2 mile ride around his neighborhood, but we have to start somewhere, right? He's signed up for Strava and we're following each other, giving kudos, etc. That can be motivating; harnessing the power of positive reinforcements. (kudos/likes)

I got a new bike rack last week and gave him my old one yesterday.
 
I know what it means to be disabled, I myself was bedridden for a good 6 month with tubes connected, unable to swallow or feed myself.
I've since recovered and worked in the VA hospital with recovering vets with disabilities.
Prior to the pandemic, I used to take my tandem bike to ride with disabled vets so they can get a feel of wind in their face & hair, just get some sense of enjoyment from being outdoors.

There are also those who refuse to believe the extent of their injuries and want to do more than they should at times.
Biting off more than you can chew can set you back further than you like sometimes.
Ebikes can easily allow a rider to ride further & faster than they think they could handle.

At 330 lb., taking a spill on a regular bike is no joke, let along an ebike that allow you to go faster with less effort.
If you have been going to rehab, ask your therapist whether taking up cycling would be a good idea.

Start out slow, but more important to be consistent, everyday.. 5 minutes, 10 minutes.. every single day.
Don't worry about mid-drive or hub drive, just worry about doing something every single day, until you get down in weight with less risk of severe injury when you take a spill.

Call me cautious, I still ride my motorcycles at triple digit speed once in a while, but I manage my risks to make sure I get home and not the hospital.
 
First, weight limits for most ebikes are 300lbs, and that INCLUDES the bike, battery, and motor, 70lbs or more.
Note that if you take a loaded 400lb ebike, and drop it over a ledge of just a few inches, the impact loads greatly exceed 400 lbs.
There is some fudge factor in the load limits but exceeding them often results in a bike that is now unusable.

70 miles, off-road, into mountains - you may be seriously dreaming here, at your current weight and physical ability.

Putting your entire load into a standard bicycle drivetrain with a mid-drive is not something I would recommend. They are both hip and trendy, though.

Take a look at juiced bikes, they have been making heavy load cargo bikes for many years.

Also seriously consider a recumbent trike, more wheels to carry the load, possible reverse gear you may need, and some carry serious loads.

If you need "get me home" capability, get two batteries, run them seperately, and when #1 gets CLOSE to low, you switch to #2, turn around, and go home. If you have a headwind on the way back, you may need all of #2 and whats left of #1 to get home.

Strongly recommend you start either with a basic bike or basic trips, or both, get your weight down, your pedal ability up, before going off-road or long distance. You could sell the first bike to get the long-distance one later. Choose wisely, keep original battery, sell bike without, use as your secondary battery. Used batteries are heavily discounted by knowledgeable buyers, worth more to you as a #2.
 
@SpectreofChaos
Re. The mid drive. Smaug covered the main reason. Better mechanical advantage by it going through the rear gearing. Inclines are so easy by downshifting and letting the mid drive get into its RPM zone.
You also mentioned going off road some. With your weight if you try and go up an incline off road it’s quite possible you will over tax a hub motor and burn it up. Also a mid drive will traverse inclines like they are not even there when run through lower gearing, while not even thinking about overheating. It will darned near spin the tire in loose dirt. I detuned my BBSHD from 30 to 20 watts max (to extend battery range) and it still climbs anything I have put it up against.
Yes, Drivetrain wear is increased with a mid drive. However KMC makes e-bike specific chains that hold up well. There are new e-bike specific chain lubes that have molybdenum disulfide in them to lower friction from the higher chain pressure. Also the BBS02 and BBSHD can be tuned where they gently start instead of slamming the drivetrain.
 
@SpectreofChaos hopefully I’m not getting to personal here. But I’m a type 2 diabetic and I’ve gone from 245lbs to 216lbs in 8 months by using the Dexcom G6 glucose monitoring patches. My AIC has gone from 7.2 to 6.5. It has helped me learn what foods to steer clear of and helps me from cheating. You can set alarms in your phone. As you eat less carbs you can keep lowering the alarm a little at a time. To me these monitoring patches have made a big difference in my journey to better health. I also have severe back problems. 3 major back injuries over the years. 3 years ago I couldn’t stand for more than 15 minutes at a time. Found out that L4,L5,&S1 vertebrae were bone on bone. Had to go through an L4/L5/S1 ALIF surgery with pretty large cages. I haven’t ridden any of my bicycles since the surgery but about 8 months ago I started riding e-bikes and have been doing great. Sometime I still have to put a back support belt on due to some inflammatory pain. But I’m moving and losing weight slowly but surely.
 
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