Which indicates distance you can travel

There is many factors that can affect your range. But the 20Ah rating/size of the battery will some what indicate what kinda distance you can travel. But figure 1mile / 1 ah of battery capacity.
 
There is many factors that can affect your range. But the 20Ah rating/size of the battery will some what indicate what kinda distance you can travel. But figure 1mile / 1 ah of battery capacity.

Bit pessimistic on level 1-2 out of 9 I will get 40 miles
 
Which indicates distance you can travel

36V not this
20Ah means what ?
or
750 Wh I assume this ?


Thanks
I would definitely say that, all other factors being equal i.e.

total mass,
route
type of terrain
speed
model of ebike, gear and tyres
gear ratio
weather (wind speed, temperature. humidity!)
motor setting (eco, turbo, etc.)

the range depends on the energy: 750 Wh. I mean that if the Ah changes (within a reasonable range) but the V changes too in such a way that the energy ([Wh] = [V] x [Ah]) remains the same, if all the other factors - see above - remain the same, also the range remains the same.

This is not the case if, for example, the voltage changes but the Ah remains the same, or vice versa. Not coincidentally, Wh is a unit of energy.

And btw: 36 V x 20 Ah = 720 Wh, not 750 Wh...
 
Just as a data point:
With a 22.4 Ah battery which is 48v, bike is equipped with two 1Kw motors; front wheel motor can be switched on or off.

Scenario 1: 12 miles at 31.1 MPH Front and Rear (1Kw each) motor switched on, no pedaling. (PAS mode 5, throttle only)

Scenario 2: Using only one (rear) of my 1Kw motors,
30 miles at 21.1 MPH using pedal assist (PAS) mode 3 with modest pedaling.

Terrain is mostly flat.
Temperatures matter, as it gets colder, battery capacity takes a hit.
I may have to redo these scenarios, as the bike has been recently switched to higher pressure street tires.

Your terms:
36V: The voltage available to drive your motors. Higher voltages usually net you more speed. Generally speaking, a 48v bike will be faster than an equivalent 36v bike.

20AH: Your battery can deliver 20 amps for an hour (AH stands for Amp-Hour), or 10 amps for 2 hours. Going faster, or going up hills consumes more Amps of current. Going slower (or pedaling harder) reduces the amount of power drawn from the battery.

750Wh: Battery voltage times AH equals Watt-Hours (Wh). In theory, it could drive a 750 Watt motor flat out for about 1 hours. In practice, this calculation is largely "notional". 36V times 20Ah is roughly 720Wh.
 
I do not under
Simple way I find is pretty accurate. Volts times amp hours. Ah. Divided by20. Is pretty close
I do not understand: firstly, V times Ah is Wh, not Ah. Second, the range depends on a lot of factors (see me previous comments), especially the level change and the assistance setting. Thirdly, do you mean miles or km?

If I understand you correctly (probably not!), in my case 625 kWh Wh / 20 = 31 miles = 50 km, but I regularly do much more than that, even though I typically climb 1500 m on gravel.

if I go flat in "eco" mode the range of my ebike (625 Wh battery) could reach in my estimation - never tried, impossible here - over 100 km.
 
I do not under

I do not understand: firstly, V times Ah is Wh, not Ah. Second, the range depends on a lot of factors (see me previous comments), especially the level change and the assistance setting. Thirdly, do you mean miles or km?

If I understand you correctly (probably not!), in my case 625 kWh / 20 = 31 miles = 50 km, but I regularly do much more than that, even though I typically climb 1500 m on gravel.

if I go flat in "eco" mode the range of my ebike (625 Wh battery) could reach in my estimation - never tried, impossible here - over 100 km.


625 kWh or Wh ???
 
In Ohms law, volts times amps give you watts. So 10 volts time 15 amps is 150 Watts. But, bike batteries have a rating called Amp hours. This is how many amps they can theoretically deliver for an hour. So, the addition of Hours to the equation gives you Watt hours.

Example: (round numbers to make it easy) A 50 Volt battery, which can deliver 10 Amps for an Hour (10 Amp hours or Ah) is 500 Watt hours (Wh).
 
It's not possible to know exactly how far you can ride because there's so many variables, but your 3 main indicators are Amp Hours, odometer, and Voltmeter. Of the 3, your voltmeter is the most valuable. When you get down to the last 5 volts above the low voltage cut off, you better be close to home, because you're almost done. With experience you can predict fairly accurately your remaining range at different speeds using the voltmeter only.
 
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