On bike storage options with Creo SL

starrtech2000

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Just picked up a close out deal on a Turbo Creo SL comp and realizing that the storage methods I’m used to using on my other gravel bike won’t work… I typically use a small top tube bag that connects to the head tube and I can’t use that because the power controls would be covered. I also use a Keg storage unit in the under down tube bottle cage and the Creo doesn’t have cage bosses there, I assume because of the battery…

Any thoughts for other on bike storage options with these limitations?
 
It all depends on what and how much you want to be able to carry. It's so much easier to decide what you are going to do with the bike and how prior to buying the frame. The 1st place I add weight to my bike is in handlebar bags. Putting the weight over the front wheel 1st works best for me and actually makes the bike more stable. Feed bags, made by lots of manufacturers work great for various small items and can be positioned easily. I have them on the bike most of the time. Some guys like strapping bags to the front fork, but I don't like unsuspended weight bouncing around. If you want to do more than day rides you should have racks. I like having gear with me all the time that will keep me warm and dry but also be able to maintain the bike and deal with minor technical difficulties. - https://photos.app.goo.gl/7Fa9PgxUi2Q6fzvB7
 
Easiest is to buy a bum bag like the Osprey Savu 5 Lumbar Bike Hydration Pack. With most of these the hydration unit can be removed to provide more space for other items.

I use one of the Topeak saddle bags that mounts under the seat. I like that there is a quick release clamp so I can remove it in seconds from the bike. The medium size will hold a 700x30 tube, CO2 cartridge, and a multi-tool.
 
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Handlebar mounted bags can greatly reduce stability when going down steep grades. I have experienced front wheel oscillation that was severe and put me at risk of a nasty spill. OK is you want to hold a small water bottle and a snack bar but still it would be my last choice.
 
Handlebar mounted bags can greatly reduce stability when going down steep grades. I have experienced front wheel oscillation that was severe and put me at risk of a nasty spill. OK is you want to hold a small water bottle and a snack bar but still it would be my last choice.
True... on a stripped-down bike descending single-track quickly, but not when additional weight is equally distributed around the frame while riding in a wide variety of terrains. With a 17 lb. battery in the frame triangle, 7 lbs. of Fugoo XL speaker on the back rack, and all on a heavy steel touring bike frame I can load over 40 lbs. more on the front in panniers and dual bar bags and it just makes the bike more stable at speed. It's unrideable with significant weight in the trailer and/or back panniers without the front end fully loaded. The difference with mine is that I had to learn how to ride her at her minimum weight, which is still heavy for a bicycle and then at each successive increase. With bar-bags, front panniers, rear panniers, trailer with a light load, and with a heavy load, and everything in between. The biggest wildcard for me is the surface, from hardball to sand... which can make me change my load somewhat also. I've used both an Arkel large bar bag and a Rockbros double-ended bar bag for 6 years now... both at the same time and both overloaded I'm afraid. I only get a couple of months a year that I don't need to take additional layers of clothing with me. If I ride single track I can slide the Arkel off and drop anything I want out of the double-ended bag easily. It's nice to have a real tool kit with you when something unexpected happens.

This was a good one. -

https://photos.app.goo.gl/7BwWQtFgEc6enDRF7
 
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