My butt gets sore!

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I have a good suspension seat post and a cloud 9 seat and my butt still gets sore after about 10 miles. More specifically my pelvic bone area. I guess the next logical move would be those bicycle pants with the padded butt cheeks but I don't want to wear them unless I could wear something over them. I don't like that look. Heck, I don't like the looks of a helmet either but that's a safety issue and I'll put up with that. What's everyone else doing or is it not an issue? Anyone switched from a cloud 9 to something better that made a difference?
 
just wear shorts or pants over the glute padded shorts.

plus yur arse needs to get conditioned to riding....for sum it's a little conditioning ...for sum it's alot of ride time/more conditioning.
 
All bicycle seats are ass hatchets. I changed to moped style.
 

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There are different types of discomfort that can be saddle related. Saddle position, (fore and aft, height, nose up or down), can lead to soreness. A saddle that is too narrow or too wide for your sit bones can cause soreness. A wide saddle that you sink into will make your cheeks ache. It can be difficult to pinpoint the exact cause. As HumanPerson said, a rider’s but needs to get conditioned.

Cycling shorts are not so much for padding as they are to prevent chafing, provide support and wick away sweat.

A good bIke shop is generally the place to start. Talk with the people that know their stuff, (avoid the racers). A bike fitting can be money well spent, just make sure that they understand the type of riding that you prefer.
 
Its a common thing that when someone gets back on the bike after a long absence (or for the first time) the pain they expect to feel that knocks them off the bike is in their legs. But its usually the butt that is the one to give out first.

Those Grandma's-sofa type bicycle seats like a Cloud 9 generally do not actually solve any saddle fitment problems. They just mask the problem so you can last longer.

As @HumanPerson noted above, the solution is almost always more riding. Get your butt cheeks in condition because when riding a bike they are getting punched over and over again while at the same time getting pressed on hard.

I have been riding with lycra cycling shorts since I was in my teens, but being 60 now, the world is no longer prepared for my awesomeness in spandex. So I wear plain old Costco-bought cargo shorts over top of them. You need that butt padding, but as @Django says the bigger benefit is the flat seams positioned in different places than regular shorts. They prevent chafing in several unmentionable places. Wearing shorts over them diminishes this benefit, because regular seams still rub, but so long as you wear the outer shorts a bit loosely you'll be fine.
 
i just recently got one of them big bum memory gel foam cushion seats for my bike and no more sore arse when riding even 18-mile trips or over bumpy tarain. They also have seat covers to and someone else i know went and put both on their bike and has even more cushion now.
 
I think I had a different problem, but I solved it by going to a nose less saddle(spider) with a gel seat cover over it. Of course, I ride a fat tire bike inflated to less than 10 lbs. with good air shocks front and rear. Also, a dropper post helps me shift position on long or bumpy rides.
 
When I was doing long distance riding I learned to lift my butt off the seat anytime I saw a rough section of road and to frequently lift by butt, standing to pedal or coast. The micro shocks of rough road takes a toll not just the big jolts. With the drop style handlebars of road bikes makes this much easier.
 
If your riding posture is more upright then more weight is on your butt. The more you lean forward the more weight gets distributed to your arms.
 
Why would a person NOT want to wear something that makes riding more comfortable? :oops:

Just try it. Next you will be shaving legs, buying aero shoe covers, pedaling centuries.
 
33.3 mile ride yesterday & my butt hurts this morning. I've got a suspension post, selle gel saddle, but the condition of the roads & cyclepaths in the uk are appalling, potholes, tree roots, ridges etc. I've been riding bicycles properly since the age of 16 & I'm now 59 & my butt still hurts no matter the set up. Try to use your legs more, get your butt off of the saddle. Back when they used to use toweling in pubs for wiping up spills, blackthorn logos that sort of thing, we'd nick them & sew them into our trousers for protection & to look cool. I've tried gel seat covers but they've never fitted properly & offered very little relief. I bought a lankeleisi mg740 recently & you ought to see the saddle on that beastie, it's like an armchair, but it's to wide & rubs the upper most inside of my thigh. I find that if your cycling each day that after a few weeks your butt gets used to it, you cycle occasionally & it hurts. I think cycle shorts look stupid, what do they say middle aged man in lycra & no one wants to see my hairy legs.
I have a good suspension seat post and a cloud 9 seat and my butt still gets sore after about 10 miles. More specifically my pelvic bone area. I guess the next logical move would be those bicycle pants with the padded butt cheeks but I don't want to wear them unless I could wear something over them. I don't like that look. Heck, I don't like the looks of a helmet either but that's a safety issue and I'll put up with that. What's everyone else doing or is it not an issue? Anyone switched from a cloud 9 to something better that made a difference?
 
If your riding posture is more upright then more weight is on your butt. The more you lean forward the more weight gets distributed to your arms.
True, but that poses another set of problems for us old farts. Back, arms, hands, neck. I just put a wide cushy seat and soft spring seat post on. Doubled my range.
 
Like the others said, more biking to build up your butt callous. I bought a Bi-Saddle (brand) type seat. It's adjustable to your preference. Love it, but its pricey. Add a thudbuster or another type of shock seat post and you'll notice the difference immediately. Good luck, comfort is the most important part if biking
 
Throw me into the butt conditioning ring as well.

My back side always hurts when I start riding following a long absence, but once on the saddle for a couple weeks, it generally goes away.

If it persists despite the mitigation measures you’ve already taken, there might be an issue with the positioning of the seat, it’s angle, or even how your body fits on the bike in relation to the pedals.
 
Years ago.....we took city slicker hunters to the back country on horseback........after 5 to 6 hours in the saddle......it was fun and entertaining to watch them walk around camp in the evening rubbing their sore butts.....some even developed blisters....we use to offer up some horse salve if they really hurt or encourage them to sit in the cold creek.
 
Even after 20 years of horse riding and cattle mustering ,with 64 years on motorbikes ,I still get a bit sore on my new e-bike .
I have bought a well priced Amazon wide seat . Its on its way and I will report on its suitability .
I have a Cheeko 90 on my Giant Trance 3 and have tried it on the e-bike , not so good , but better than original seat .

I cant find any info on Cheeko ?
 

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If your butt is sore, stand up, don't just keep sitting on your butt.
It is good practice to relief your butt from pressure every 15-20 minutes anyway.
Just stand up from the seat for 15-20 seconds usually allow enough relief to prevent soreness.
As you cycle more, your butt will get more tolerance to saddle time, bigger saddle than needed just get in the way of your cycling motion.

Cycling shorts are great not only for the padding, the form-fitting lycra/spandex actually support your leg muscles, glute muscles and lower back muscles while cycling.
Similar to wearing a back brace when lifting heavy weights, the tight short protect your muscles during cycling activity.
 
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