Volts watts

Cutty

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Hi everybody I'm a new booty to the ebiking world. But I have a question? I have 48v 1000w rear hub. And a 52b battery. Now should get a higher voltage controller the same as battery or will it be just fine?
 
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Anton

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Hi there, welcome to the forum. Did you mean 52v battery instead of 52b?

In general a 48 Volt controller and motor requires a 48 Volt pack. Most ebike controllers will allow a range of voltages before they blow, so it is possible you could use a 52 Volt battery even though your controller is only rated for 48 Volts.

Basically you are over volting your 48 Volt controller and motor and this means you will get a performance gain (with a chance of frying your controller). Upping the voltage of your battery is the easiest way to get more performance gain from an ebike. Be aware that the controller and motor may heat up more and don't expect your warranty to cover you. (I can not guarantee this will work so you are doing this at your own risk).

The safe way is to only use a battery that is rated for your controller and motor. So to answer your question, yes you should upgrade your controller and motor.
 
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Hoggdoc

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Hi everybody I'm a new booty to the ebiking world. But I have a question? I have 48v 1000w rear hub. And a 52b battery. Now should get a higher voltage controller the same as battery or will it be just fine?
The motor should be just fine, but the controller is another issue. If doesn't specify use with 52 v you will be taking chances. One thing to remember is as you increase the voltage you reduce the number of Amps necessary to achieve a given wattage.

For instances a 48 volt battery would need to output 20.83 Amps to develop 1000 Watts of power at the motor. A 52 V battery would only need 19.23 Amps to produce the same 1000 Watts. Because the 52 V battery in effect reduces the Amps input to the motor the motor should run cooler. The formula for this is called Ohm's law and can be used to calculate voltage, amps and watts. Volts x Amps = Watts; Watts / Volts = Amps.

When you select your controller pick one that not only matches the voltage from the. batter but also has the ability to handle the Amps output to provide the desired Watts to the motor. In most case hub. motor can handle a bunch more Watts than their rated output. Increasing the Amps/Watts will increase the power and torque the motor will produce. If you have a quality motor you could double or more the power without too much trouble.
 
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