Longtime bike enthusiast. ebike noob.

Bike Wanderer

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Hi Forum! A short intro to get things started. I'm @BikeWanderer

Been biking for ages. :cool:
Complete Noob to ebikes. :eek:
LSS, I hope to find an ebike that checks all my boxes and share the wealth here on the forum and have some discussion. :unsure:

But for now, you'll just have to watch me go down the rabbit hole. o_O

Thanks in advance. :geek:
 

"A"

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Give some more details of what you're looking for.
-Budget
-Usage
-Expected range
-Terrain
-Rider weight

The more detail your provide, the better suggestions you might receive.
 

Bike Wanderer

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Give some more details of what you're looking for.
Budget - under $1500. preferably with standardized or replaceable parts
Usage - Daily driver, trail riding and expedition. Bike to work 1m and 20+miles out of town on the weekends.
Expected range - 60 miles over hills with a full backpack.
Terrain - Off road and on - Roads, bike trails, Go anywhere, All weather.
Rider weight over $250.
The more detail your provide, the better suggestions you might receive.

Long view, I'm looking for an 'e' version of what I own now. I want the bike to match the convivence factor of my current daily driver.
It's a robust 29" hardtail MTB 'hybrid' with disk brakes and Shimano/standard parts. Essentially a road friendly mountain bike. I go where I want. :cool:

So it would be something that can be fixed at my local bike shops or perhaps miles away from home. Swappable, upgradable batteries would be a plus. An engine design that would allow me to pedal, if the electric moter quits out while I'm out and about. I hope to bike from my doorstep to destinations over 100m away from home for my vacation. So that's the piece of mind I'm seeking.

Out in the wild, I'm seeing a deluge of bike frames on the newer ebikes, which seem like a step backward in design, weight and function.
Typically as a buyer, I look at the bike frames as my starting point and tend to upgrade the parts on my bikes over time. Changing out for lighter, better designed parts.

Thanks for any input.
Cheers :coffee:
 

"A"

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Do you live in an area that you can ride year round?

Is the ebike going to be stored for weeks or months without use in the winter?

Is the ebike going to be transported by car or just be ridden to most places you need to be?

Most ebikes at $1500 price point have standard drivetrain, battery & motor; hub-motor would have more models to pick from... mid-drive motor ebike, not so much.

29" wheels would limit your choices.. but here's a ebike that can support your weight, I found out the brakes are hydraulic:

 

Bike Wanderer

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Do you live in an area that you can ride year round?

Is the ebike going to be stored for weeks or months without use in the winter?
I bike year round. Less in the wintertime. I would be storing it more/ riding less in the winter. I could compromise and store it during the winter if that would be favorable and ride my main bike. Great question BTW!
Is the ebike going to be transported by car or just be ridden to most places you need to be?

Most ebikes at $1500 price point have standard drivetrain, battery & motor; hub-motor would have more models to pick from... mid-drive motor ebike, not so much.
Don't plan on transporting so much. Mostly grab and go. Trying to wrap my head about the different types and models of motors. Pros and cons. So any sort of input here would be appreciated. I'm guessing a mid-drive is what I'm seeking, but perhaps not?

Am aware that 29" limits my choices, would consider a 27" if the other checkboxes get filled. But I do believe such a creature exists and willing to take my time with my decision. ;)

I will look over your first suggestion and borrow the specs from that, @"A ". I have also been looking at a few more conventional MTBs and their ebike versions as well.
 

"A"

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Conversions are great is you have time and tools needed for the job.
It takes time to get everything dialed in specifically for your needs.
Most of the ebikes under $1500 are pretty well sorted out of the box these days. Pretty much plug-n-play.
Conversion to MTB to ebike is fun if you have the interest to tinker and work for it... eventually, cost may be just as much, but you do invest your time and learn some skills along the way.

The ebikes that I see the most are the ones that delivery folks use in NYC, they run 24/7 in all weather.
Since how much money they make depend on how reliable their ebikes operate, I'd imagine they are reliable and easily serviced.
Article below is from 2019, laws have changed since in NYC:
 

"A"

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Non-helpful post as always.
Not everyone rides the same way you do.
Just because someone is not spending $2-3k on a ebike doesn't mean they can't enjoy cycling.
 

Bike Wanderer

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The ebikes that I see the most are the ones that delivery folks use in NYC, they run 24/7 in all weather.
Well the article piqued my curiosity. :geek: The delivery bikes seem like a kind of a prototype that was made out of necessity. Before NYS made laws in what is considered an ebike.

Been there, done that. Although, the marketplace might not be as plagued with parts shortages and I'm not in a rush to buy. :unsure:
However LSS, It's now slowly becoming more of an issue of practicality that I get an ebike, since the car market is overinflated and won't correct itself anytime soon.


Well perhaps you could do us all a favor and share some of that experience? And perhaps rise the level of discussion in this thread. Mkay? ;)
I will get around to reading your's and other's posts in the other threads and catch up at some point. Then I will share the wealth and add more to the discussions. We all had to start as a noob at some point and I don't need to be on the bleeding edge of technology with an ebike or even worse, buy one out of impulse. :( That's part of what brought me to the forum.

Just because someone is not spending $2-3k on a ebike doesn't mean they can't enjoy cycling.
Indeed, And more bike companies are having an ebike line of bikes as opposed to having 'the one model'. (y)
Things are definitely branching out. When Wal-mart sells ebikes, then I figure the market has broadened enough for me to take a deeper dive.:D
 

"A"

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What you fail to understand is that everyone need (nor afford) to buy a high performance ebike;
just because someone has different needs than you doesn't mean that they are foolish, feeble-minded.
It is your lack of experience for enjoyment in simple form of cycling that makes you blind in other people's needs over unnecessary spending for performance that is not required.
Your analogies clearly demonstrate your elitism and lack of understanding in reality; similar to a soup-nazi for ebikes.
Your high performance ebike can easily loose a few pound of weight if you stop carrying all the excess stuff that you don't need to enjoy a good ride.
 

"A"

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As if you have experience?
When was the last time you've purchased and ridden a $1500 ebike purchased from online seller?
how many such experiences have you had to consider yourself 'experienced'?
Go ahead, share your "real life, personal experience".
 

Bike Wanderer

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I pondered that a little further. :unsure: Well I supposed I could create a want list of ebikes that are worth trying out and match it with places worth going to and have the best of both worlds. :D Get familiar with how the different moters behave without the risk. I can just plan on making all of my mistakes with the rentals and narrow down my choices.
So I'll continue my quest for the best bike and have a want list of 'must try' bikes.
 
D

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You are doing what not many do, which is NOT go from car to ebike, but from regular bike to ebike. Different mindset.

Try a little thought problem. Think of bumps, sudden stops, lots of little things you encounter while riding. Now, for each and every one, imagine you are going 5- 15 mph faster. What do you need? Also, that 5-20 mile ride you take often? Now you do it much more often, and go 10-40 miles frequently.

Light weight is sacrificed for durability. Safety is a larger concern. Heavier tires, more durable rim. Shocks, brakes. Better seat, better seating position. More padding for your ass, as you get more saddle time. Handgrip pads or rests. Because it is easier now, and more fun.

You can buy a hub motor bare, and build your own rim or hire it done. The savings in shipping costs from the smaller box nearly outweighs cost if you hire the work, and you get a MUCH better rim, spokes, and build. Whatever size rim you want. Not hard to do yourself, but tedious.

Something in the ballpark of a Mac or Bafang geared rear hub, 1000 watt, 13S battery, AH is going to be a question. Gets down to where to hang it, and do you sacrifice range for performance, or reduce the motor and get more range and go a bit slower? Or a big honkin DD hub and monstrous power for a dirtbike?

If it is purely a playtoy, and you have major hills to deal with, a crank-drive might be a good option, with some drawbacks.
 

Bike Wanderer

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You are doing what not many do, which is NOT go from car to ebike, but from regular bike to ebike. Different mindset.
I do feel that, Especially, when looking at what is offered in the wild. So many ebikes, seem like a step backward in weight, design and function.
Totally understand those whose starting point is getting a bike to say lose weight on the weekends or specifically for that local rail to trail.
Also that I have an MTB hybrid that checks all my boxes. So I refer to that as some sort of baseline as to what I'm looking for. I'm also optimistic this future ebike will propel me into a different class of rider as well.

Try a little thought problem. Think of bumps, sudden stops, lots of little things you encounter while riding. Now, for each and every one, imagine you are going 5- 15 mph faster. What do you need? Also, that 5-20 mile ride you take often? Now you do it much more often, and go 10-40 miles frequently.
Most new ebike users will go further and faster and should adjust accordingly. At least bring a spare water bottle. :)
I'm guessing the biggest impact for me will be the ability to keep my cadence for long distances and where I choose to bike. I will fear no hill!
Essentially the two biggest walls I'm experiencing now. Another future consideration is where I can charge about 60m away from home.

Light weight is sacrificed for durability. Safety is a larger concern. Heavier tires, more durable rim. Shocks, brakes. Better seat, better seating position. More padding for your ass, as you get more saddle time. Handgrip pads or rests. Because it is easier now, and more fun.

You can buy a hub motor bare, and build your own rim or hire it done. The savings in shipping costs from the smaller box nearly outweighs cost if you hire the work, and you get a MUCH better rim, spokes, and build. Whatever size rim you want. Not hard to do yourself, but tedious.

Something in the ballpark of a Mac or Bafang geared rear hub, 1000 watt, 13S battery, AH is going to be a question. Gets down to where to hang it, and do you sacrifice range for performance, or reduce the motor and get more range and go a bit slower? Or a big honkin DD hub and monstrous power for a dirtbike?

If it is purely a playtoy, and you have major hills to deal with, a crank-drive might be a good option, with some drawbacks.
Thanks for the breakdown and some parts to consider for a build.
It does kind of boil down as a tradeoff of being lightweight VS weight and power.
Also do you buy a bike with a frame that is pretty much designed around an electric motor or do you buy/DIY the best designed bike for you, then add the motor and take the penalty? Or some sort of compromise?

Will look further on all the motor types pros and cons. I'm still being persuaded by the other options. For now, I'm leaning towards a motor system that is lightweight and enhances my bike riding game with as little impact on my riding style as necessary.
 
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