whats the largest motor u can run with 48v 22.4ah battery??

Patg

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whats the largest motor u can run with 48v 22.4ah battery?? I have 750watt and want get a faster motor ,Thanks
 
Many 48 volt front wheel electric conversion kits have a special wire that if activated will allow switching between 750 watts (slower and lasts longer) to and 1000 watts to go faster but less distance or efficient!

On my kit it is a blue wire that if connected, limits my power drain from 1000W to 750w! I intend to install an on/off switch to work that blue wire.
 
Playing very fast and loose with definitions, put this in automotive terms: Volts are horsepower. Amps are torque. Amp Hours are the gas tank size. An old saying goes like this: Horsepower sells cars and torque wins races. More volts = higher top speed. More amps = faster acceleration.

None of these things have any bearing on the motor. The motor wattage rating doesn't control your speed. It controls how long it survives drinking in all the power you feed in. Thats what a motor with a higher wattage rating has over one with a lower rating: survivability under higher load.

You want faster top speed? Get a higher voltage battery. You want faster acceleration to roughly the same top speed? Get a controller that feeds more amps (and that does not exceed your battery's BMS ratings, which are another limiting factor independent of voltage and amp-hour capacity).

A 48v battery - speaking generally here as there are many variables you can throw in - is on a geared hub motor likely going to get you up into a 25 mph peak with the right controller. 52v hits maybe 28-ish. Step up to 60v and a Bafang G060 750w fat motor with a KT 35a controller is good for 40 mph.
 
You can run a 1500 watt motor and top at 30mph, however, you may need to upgrade your controller and possibly display. 750 watt motors usually top at 28 mph, so difference is negligible compared to the cost. You will reach top speed faster, but that will eat up lots of battery.
 
Playing very fast and loose with definitions, put this in automotive terms: Volts are horsepower. Amps are torque. Amp Hours are the gas tank size. An old saying goes like this: Horsepower sells cars and torque wins races. More volts = higher top speed. More amps = faster acceleration.

None of these things has any bearing on the motor. The motor doesn't control your speed. It controls how long it survives drinking in all the power you feed in. Thats what a motor with a higher wattage rating has over one with a lower rating: survivability under higher load.

You want faster top speed? Get a higher voltage battery. You want faster acceleration to roughly the same top speed? Get a controller that feeds more amps (and that does not exceed your battery's BMS ratings, which are another limiting factor independent of voltage and amp-hour capacity).

A 48v battery - speaking generally here as there are many variables you can throw in - is on a geared hub motor likely going to get you up into a 25 mph peak with the right controller. 52v hits maybe 28-ish. Step up to 60v and a Bafang G060 750w fat motor with a KT 35a controller is good for 40 mph.
Excellent analogy. It's best to try and explain these things in the most simple and understandable terms, very similar to what you're saying. I've occasionally gotten feedback saying I'm not quite right. My replies always were that I know I wasn't 100% correct but I was trying to explain in simple understandable terms and language and not to nitpick my words.
 
Excellent analogy. It's best to try and explain these things in the most simple and understandable terms, very similar to what you're saying. I've occasionally gotten feedback saying I'm not quite right. My replies always were that I know I wasn't 100% correct but I was trying to explain in simple understandable terms and language and not to nitpick my words.
You did fine. The thing that really gets my goat is a query that gets" crickets" finally some bloke will try to help out and some"nazi" will jump down their throat with miniscule corrections.
 
I've occasionally gotten feedback saying I'm not quite right. My replies always were that I know I wasn't 100% correct but I was trying to explain in simple understandable terms and language.
Yes absolutely! Hence my 'fast and loose' comment. I've already had the joy of that reaction to this specific example.

Although, to be fair, I'm usually the one waxing eloquent on some BS bit of minutiae.
 
Many seem to directly equate motor watts with speed, and this is just not correct. Most ebike motors are made with several different windings, or turn counts, (KV rating) which will very dramatically with higher speed and lower torque, or the other way around. A higher voltage battery will make the same motor faster, but a higher-speed wind motor will be faster with the same battery.

One common motor, same model, will do either 210rpm, 260rpm, or 325rpm, on the same battery. Only difference is turn count.
 
I have ran a 1500 watt motor with a 10.4 Ah battery, it just won't go very far.
 
whats the largest motor u can run with 48v 22.4ah battery?? I have 750watt and want get a faster motor ,Thanks
It's not the battery capacity that determines the motor size, it's the BMS and the controller. Also to some degree the cells used in building the battery pack because each type of cell has a maximum number of amps they can discharge.

Your battery pack should be able to easily handle 2000 watts with the correct controller, but the real question is how long that battery will past putting out the amount energy necessary to feed that much power.
 
It's not the battery capacity that determines the motor size, it's the BMS and the controller. Also to some degree the cells used in building the battery pack because each type of cell has a maximum number of amps they can discharge.

Your battery pack should be able to easily handle 2000 watts with the correct controller, but the real question is how long that battery will past putting out the amount energy necessary to feed that much power.
The battery will be "happier" at a lower discharge rate and last longer as well.
 
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