Two batteries one controller

Burlingtony65

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I have an ENVO kit on my Cannodale hybrid and I now have two 36v 11.6aH Batteries that I want to use to extend my cycling range. I have found some adapters but I’m not sure if they will work for my controller unit. I can just switch the good battery for the dead one but that seems kind of old school. Has anyone done this successfully?
Thanks in advance!
 

Biggtac1974

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I have an ENVO kit on my Cannodale hybrid and I now have two 36v 11.6aH Batteries that I want to use to extend my cycling range. I have found some adapters but I’m not sure if they will work for my controller unit. I can just switch the good battery for the dead one but that seems kind of old school. Has anyone done this successfully?
Thanks in advance!
Sounds like a good plan.im sure you will figure it out
 

Anton

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Make sure you connect the batteries in parallel so you end up with the same voltage 36V and double the amps 23.2Ah.

If you connect them right it'll be just like having a bigger battery. If you connect them wrong you'll end up with melted wires and or a fried controller.

The other way would be to put a DC battery switch and wire it so you can switch to the other battery when one is empty.

You're probably best going with the first option, as it will extend the life of the batteries, since you will not be draining them down as low as if you were only using a single battery.
 

Anton

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Anton

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Actually I did a little diode research and you can get these Schottky diodes which only drop the voltage by around 0.15V to 0.46V. They also put off a little heat so you need a heat sink. By comparison, standard silicon diodes have a forward voltage drop of around 0.6V.

Considering the y-connector you shared @Frogslayer has a heat sink, I would say it it using either Schottky diodes or a MOSFET to protect polarity. It could also isolate the batteries from one another to avoid the fuller battery charging the flatter battery. It's hard to tell since the description doesn't really tell us anything. Nothing in the description about max voltage, max amperage or polarity protection.

Another simpler way would be to just put a fuse on the positive wire of each battery and then wire them together into

A diagram showing how to wire in parallel always helps (please disregard the voltage and amperage of the batteries in the diagram). Note that you don't have to wire it at the base of the battery terminals. You simply just bring the battery wires together and connect with plugs or solder - positive to positive and negative to negative on the batteries. Then connect the output positive to positive and negative to negative to the controller.

Parallel.jpg
 

powrtrip

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I build cross current protect cables....use button diodes.. 50 amp 400 volt... Same used in charger systems... DM me if interested.. price depends on connectors
 
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