Specialized Como 5 poor battery perfomance

Ade169xxx

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Why not to purchase a Specialised Ebike





Having bought a Specialised Como 5 Ebike from Ark Cycles, Brimscombe, Stroud, Gloucestershire, at a cost of £4500, in Feb 2023. It is proving, due to its very expensive batteries very limited endurance, to be something of a major disappointment.

The bike itself being comfortable to ride, it includes such niceties as a radar, which shows dots on the display on the handlebars, indicating what traffic is behind you, and automatic gears.

Having proved to be useless for the Sunday rides I purchased it for. Where accompanied by 5 to 15 friends, we go off on a day long cycle rides. Stopping along the way to visit cafes and pubs, to meet and socialise with other like-minded cyclists along the way. We took our first ride of the year in February, and using the Como 5 Ebike in eco, sports and power modes - as required by the terrain. I ended up having to push the bike home for the last 5 miles, of what would have been a 27-mile ride, after the battery bottomed out.

A battery being the most essential element of any electric bike, instead of its claimed range of 60 miles in sports mode. The Como 5 has a range of around 28 – 32 miles, using it in sports mode on flat terrain. Using all the modes to suit the terrain, I get 20 – 28 miles. The very hungry Power mode - 7miles

The last 20% of the battery depleting faster than water going down a drain. 5% having been reserved to ensure the batteries don’t go completely flat. The last 20% of the battery vanished in 2 to 3 miles in eco mode.

It being the last 20% of the battery that is the most relied on, especially when coming to the end of a day’s ride. This caught me short on that first Sunday ride. Having run the battery down a number of times since then. The last 20% always reacts the same. Just enough left to barely power the lights

Getting it home that day, not being easy, due to the automatic gears not functioning without battery power. The bike remained stuck in one of its lowest gears. Going up inclines like pushing a barrow half full of bricks uphill. Without battery power, the Como 5 proved a tough ride on any terrain other than on the level, or downhill.

.

It being stated in the bike’s manual, the battery loses its capacity to hold a charge by 1.25% per month, or 15% per year, whether it’s in use or not. A battery with a 30-mile range instead of the claimed 60 it’s supposed to have, will lose its capacity twice as fast. After all, it will need to be charged twice as many times.

So, with its present capacity to hold a charge set to shrink by between 20% and 30% before this year is out. I am most certainly not prepared to pay £1000 to replace one dud with another such dud. ABSOLUTELY NOT – NO - NO - NO. That’s going to leave me with an expensive, very useless Ebike less than a year old.

Stan, the person who suggested I do this review after test riding the bike for 25 miles. He has calculated it will cost him considerably less using his 250cc motorcycle to travel the 200 miles to and from work each week, than it would cost me doing 100 miles a week using this Ebike. And this includes the added cost of tax and insurance on his motorcycle.

With most Ebikes in the £4.500 to £5.500 range being capable of around 70 -90 miles in sports mode. Even a Halfords cheapy with a wheel motor and a battery on the rack, can boast better mileage than this Specialised dud. I know, because the two Halford Ebikes used on that ride back in February, were still going strong when the Como 5 conked out.

Having taken the bike back to the Arc Cycles shop, where I complained about the batteries lack of performance. I was surprised when both the mechanic and sales persons tried convincing me this was probably normal. Due the mechanic stated, to the bike having a radar and automatic gears. Having disabled the radar and the front light, (not the gears) it made little or no impression on the battery’s terrible performance.

The online Specialised Turbo Range Calculator: indicating this bike should have a range of around 60 miles in sports mode on level terrain, for a man of my size (I had reviewed and checked this before I purchased the bike) It is instead is proving to be more like one of those Laptops, which last half the time they are supposed to when powered by battery. Unlike Ebikes however, laptops can still be used while they are charging, and you don’t have to push them miles home, when the battery conks out.

The mechanics attitude at Arc Cycles indicating I should accept the poor milage for this bike, striking me as being the normal response to complaints of this kind. It is natural to conclude Specialised bike batteries are in the main, despite being very expensive – very very poor performers.

Coincidentally, concerning batteries, I was visiting a supermarket recently when I met a friend who had just purchased a new bike for himself. This one having a Bosch motor and Bosch batteries. He had, he informed me, already done 45 miles on a full charge, with the display indicating the battery was capable of covering another 45 miles in sports mode.

A replacement Bosch battery for his bike, being capable of 1200 charges (not the very limited 300 charge of the fast-depleting Specialised battery) It costs £750 and is not only much cheaper and much more powerful than its Specialised counterpart. It will also over the next several years, save its owner thousands of pounds by not having to be replaced annually.

I still have an old Kalkhoff bike. (Nine years old now) and while it is proving impossible to get spare parts for it. Despite its age, its battery is still capable of outperforming the two-month-old Como 5 battery.

The Kalkhoff being the bike I must use, if I want to continue the Sunday rides. Just to avoid having to push the Come 5 home for the last 5 to 10 miles. (At 75 it can be quite tiring) I have it seems, been left with a right lemon where the very short-range, very expensive to run, Specialised Como 5 is concerned.

The Como 5 going back to the shop on Tues 25th of April, to fix the back LED light which failed within a month of my purchasing the bike. They will also, I have been informed, check the battery.

The female assistant in the shop having suggested the first time I returned the bike; I should try riding it without the battery if I wanted more mileage. (I would have bought a standard mountain bike if I intended doing that) This completely unhelpful suggestion made me realise what I might be up against when dealing with them.

Having had the battery tested last week when my son was down in BRISTOL, which was not cheap and took 48 hours. I will wait and see what Arc Cycles have to say, before I set about completing the final review. The result of the test however, prompting me to apply for an application to make a claim in the Small Claims Court. (Something that will cost me £205, if I am forced to take Arc Cycles to court) I am also, along with several friends from the cycle club, actively surfing the web in the cause of something we are now calling; Operation Dud Battery.

Gathering up the contacts of as many cycle clubs and forums as we can, we are also creating accounts in them. I already have 17 accounts. My friends having more, we will, come May the 1st, - if I remain unsatisfied with Arc Cycles response to the dud battery, start emailing copies of the then finished version of this review, to all the new contacts we have made.

Having already started passing around printed copies to those Ebike riders we encounter; we are also placing them on any parked Ebikes we pass in any town centres we pass through. I will also be posting one to Specialised Headquarters as they don’t seem to accept email. Not surprising, considering the complaints they must receive concerning their expensive batteries lack of longevity and power.

Rather than spending a fortune over the next ten years, regularly replacing batteries which will undoubtedly end up costing you way more than your specialised Ebike did – simply avoid purchasing a specialised Ebike.



Afterthought​



What do you think would happen if one of the Arc Cycles staff purchased an electric car with a purported range of 200 miles, only to discover after using it a few times it only had a range of 100 miles.

Would they say “That’s ok, that seems normal.”

Of course not, that car would be back to the dealers faster than you can blink.

Would it not be nice, if this also applied to their customers.
 
We own two Comos - a 2019 and a 2023 - and have not had battery issues like this. The 2019 has a smaller battery (500w) than the 2023 (710w) and after a few hundred recharge cycles, the Mission Control app says the 2019 has 90% of it's original charge capacity. My observation is that it's closer to 80% based on the number of miles it provides per ride (on same route over four years of riding). In any case, the 2023 Como 4.0 will match the Specialized range calculator on the road--so 75 mile ride is completely doable.

I also have a 2019 Vado 5.0 with a 650w battery with about 14,000 miles on it. Mission Control reports 100% of original battery capacity and my observation is 90% after four years riding. I regularly get up to 100 miles range in ECO but I've tweaked the battery output in Mission Control. So, I don't think the issue you face is a general Specialized e-bike matter--it's a specific problem with your bike. Our local bike shop has been very, very responsive to warranty issues over the years and they would undoubtedly lend us a battery from a different bike for a test ride to prove whether the problem was your bike, the rider or your battery.
 
Bypass the dealer and contact Specialized directly. You don't say anything about the battery test, these are not simple to do. Results may or may not satisfy warranty claims requirements. Find out what the manufacturer needs to know to send you a new battery. Do not forget to see if you can keep the original, as well.
 
I own a Specialized Creo (32lb). I bought the Creo 2 years ago. Before I bought the Creo I test road many high-end ebikes, ranging from ($6,000-12,000). I believe Specialized ebikes are the most bang for the buck! I love my Creo. I'm 78 and ride 30mi rides 5 days a week. Are you still on warrenty? If you are still on warrenty call your local Specialized dealer and tell him what your issues are. Miles per charge depends on several factors including, your weight, hills etc. 60 mi on your bike is a stretch. Try riding on econo or turn off your power when you can and pedal with very little assistance to extend your range. You are right, replacement batteries are very expensive. I have no issues with my Creo. I get a tuneup at my Secialized dealer once a year. Good luck and KeepOnCrankin!

The Specialised Como 5 Ebike has a U1-600, On/Off button, state of charge display, 600Wh battery.
 
Why not to purchase a Specialised Ebike





Having bought a Specialised Como 5 Ebike from Ark Cycles, Brimscombe, Stroud, Gloucestershire, at a cost of £4500, in Feb 2023. It is proving, due to its very expensive batteries very limited endurance, to be something of a major disappointment.

The bike itself being comfortable to ride, it includes such niceties as a radar, which shows dots on the display on the handlebars, indicating what traffic is behind you, and automatic gears.

Having proved to be useless for the Sunday rides I purchased it for. Where accompanied by 5 to 15 friends, we go off on a day long cycle rides. Stopping along the way to visit cafes and pubs, to meet and socialise with other like-minded cyclists along the way. We took our first ride of the year in February, and using the Como 5 Ebike in eco, sports and power modes - as required by the terrain. I ended up having to push the bike home for the last 5 miles, of what would have been a 27-mile ride, after the battery bottomed out.

A battery being the most essential element of any electric bike, instead of its claimed range of 60 miles in sports mode. The Como 5 has a range of around 28 – 32 miles, using it in sports mode on flat terrain. Using all the modes to suit the terrain, I get 20 – 28 miles. The very hungry Power mode - 7miles

The last 20% of the battery depleting faster than water going down a drain. 5% having been reserved to ensure the batteries don’t go completely flat. The last 20% of the battery vanished in 2 to 3 miles in eco mode.

It being the last 20% of the battery that is the most relied on, especially when coming to the end of a day’s ride. This caught me short on that first Sunday ride. Having run the battery down a number of times since then. The last 20% always reacts the same. Just enough left to barely power the lights

Getting it home that day, not being easy, due to the automatic gears not functioning without battery power. The bike remained stuck in one of its lowest gears. Going up inclines like pushing a barrow half full of bricks uphill. Without battery power, the Como 5 proved a tough ride on any terrain other than on the level, or downhill.

.

It being stated in the bike’s manual, the battery loses its capacity to hold a charge by 1.25% per month, or 15% per year, whether it’s in use or not. A battery with a 30-mile range instead of the claimed 60 it’s supposed to have, will lose its capacity twice as fast. After all, it will need to be charged twice as many times.

So, with its present capacity to hold a charge set to shrink by between 20% and 30% before this year is out. I am most certainly not prepared to pay £1000 to replace one dud with another such dud. ABSOLUTELY NOT – NO - NO - NO. That’s going to leave me with an expensive, very useless Ebike less than a year old.

Stan, the person who suggested I do this review after test riding the bike for 25 miles. He has calculated it will cost him considerably less using his 250cc motorcycle to travel the 200 miles to and from work each week, than it would cost me doing 100 miles a week using this Ebike. And this includes the added cost of tax and insurance on his motorcycle.

With most Ebikes in the £4.500 to £5.500 range being capable of around 70 -90 miles in sports mode. Even a Halfords cheapy with a wheel motor and a battery on the rack, can boast better mileage than this Specialised dud. I know, because the two Halford Ebikes used on that ride back in February, were still going strong when the Como 5 conked out.

Having taken the bike back to the Arc Cycles shop, where I complained about the batteries lack of performance. I was surprised when both the mechanic and sales persons tried convincing me this was probably normal. Due the mechanic stated, to the bike having a radar and automatic gears. Having disabled the radar and the front light, (not the gears) it made little or no impression on the battery’s terrible performance.

The online Specialised Turbo Range Calculator: indicating this bike should have a range of around 60 miles in sports mode on level terrain, for a man of my size (I had reviewed and checked this before I purchased the bike) It is instead is proving to be more like one of those Laptops, which last half the time they are supposed to when powered by battery. Unlike Ebikes however, laptops can still be used while they are charging, and you don’t have to push them miles home, when the battery conks out.

The mechanics attitude at Arc Cycles indicating I should accept the poor milage for this bike, striking me as being the normal response to complaints of this kind. It is natural to conclude Specialised bike batteries are in the main, despite being very expensive – very very poor performers.

Coincidentally, concerning batteries, I was visiting a supermarket recently when I met a friend who had just purchased a new bike for himself. This one having a Bosch motor and Bosch batteries. He had, he informed me, already done 45 miles on a full charge, with the display indicating the battery was capable of covering another 45 miles in sports mode.

A replacement Bosch battery for his bike, being capable of 1200 charges (not the very limited 300 charge of the fast-depleting Specialised battery) It costs £750 and is not only much cheaper and much more powerful than its Specialised counterpart. It will also over the next several years, save its owner thousands of pounds by not having to be replaced annually.

I still have an old Kalkhoff bike. (Nine years old now) and while it is proving impossible to get spare parts for it. Despite its age, its battery is still capable of outperforming the two-month-old Como 5 battery.

The Kalkhoff being the bike I must use, if I want to continue the Sunday rides. Just to avoid having to push the Come 5 home for the last 5 to 10 miles. (At 75 it can be quite tiring) I have it seems, been left with a right lemon where the very short-range, very expensive to run, Specialised Como 5 is concerned.

The Como 5 going back to the shop on Tues 25th of April, to fix the back LED light which failed within a month of my purchasing the bike. They will also, I have been informed, check the battery.

The female assistant in the shop having suggested the first time I returned the bike; I should try riding it without the battery if I wanted more mileage. (I would have bought a standard mountain bike if I intended doing that) This completely unhelpful suggestion made me realise what I might be up against when dealing with them.

Having had the battery tested last week when my son was down in BRISTOL, which was not cheap and took 48 hours. I will wait and see what Arc Cycles have to say, before I set about completing the final review. The result of the test however, prompting me to apply for an application to make a claim in the Small Claims Court. (Something that will cost me £205, if I am forced to take Arc Cycles to court) I am also, along with several friends from the cycle club, actively surfing the web in the cause of something we are now calling; Operation Dud Battery.

Gathering up the contacts of as many cycle clubs and forums as we can, we are also creating accounts in them. I already have 17 accounts. My friends having more, we will, come May the 1st, - if I remain unsatisfied with Arc Cycles response to the dud battery, start emailing copies of the then finished version of this review, to all the new contacts we have made.

Having already started passing around printed copies to those Ebike riders we encounter; we are also placing them on any parked Ebikes we pass in any town centres we pass through. I will also be posting one to Specialised Headquarters as they don’t seem to accept email. Not surprising, considering the complaints they must receive concerning their expensive batteries lack of longevity and power.

Rather than spending a fortune over the next ten years, regularly replacing batteries which will undoubtedly end up costing you way more than your specialised Ebike did – simply avoid purchasing a specialised Ebike.



Afterthought​



What do you think would happen if one of the Arc Cycles staff purchased an electric car with a purported range of 200 miles, only to discover after using it a few times it only had a range of 100 miles.

Would they say “That’s ok, that seems normal.”

Of course not, that car would be back to the dealers faster than you can blink.

Would it not be nice, if this also applied to their customers.
I believe you are mistaken. The internal gear hub is a huge drain on power. You can hardly move the bike with the assist off.
I love the IGH as long as the battery is charged.
 
Why not to purchase a Specialised Ebike





Having bought a Specialised Como 5 Ebike from Ark Cycles, Brimscombe, Stroud, Gloucestershire, at a cost of £4500, in Feb 2023. It is proving, due to its very expensive batteries very limited endurance, to be something of a major disappointment.



Having already started passing around printed copies to those Ebike riders we encounter; we are also placing them on any parked Ebikes we pass in any town centres we pass through. I will also be posting one to Specialised Headquarters as they don’t seem to accept email. Not surprising, considering the complaints they must receive concerning their expensive batteries lack of longevity and power.

Rather than spending a fortune over the next ten years, regularly replacing batteries which will undoubtedly end up costing you way more than your specialised Ebike did – simply avoid purchasing a specialised Ebike.



Afterthought​



What do you think would happen if one of the Arc Cycles staff purchased an electric car with a purported range of 200 miles, only to discover after using it a few times it only had a range of 100 miles.

Would they say “That’s ok, that seems normal.”

Of course not, that car would be back to the dealers faster than you can blink.

Would it not be nice, if this also applied to their customers.
Yours is a common mistake. The auto transmission is about 15 percent of your power drain if you set your power to zero you can coast just fine, but as soon as you start pedaling your bike will slow down because the transmission kicks in. It will pedal like a normal bike at about 15 percent power. The planetary transmission is the power drain.
 
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