Several Things You Should Know before Having An Ebike

Kayla

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With the cadence option, the sensor recognizes how speedy the pedals are spinning and then applies motor force respectively, making pushing easier. The two sensors on the ebike offer various pedal assist modes to choose from, depending on whether you need more or less power.

Both battery and motor determine range

Both devices are the most important parts of an electric bike. The ‘Range’ we talk about is the max distance after the battery is fully charged. Multiple elements that influence the range include rider weight, terrain, tire pressure, and pedaling aggression. Ebike specs directly related to the range are battery and motor type. The majority of electric bikes’ traveling ranges is from 30 to 80 miles. At the same time, electric bikes with a longer range will also affect the service life of the battery. Therefore, choosing a range that suits you is a factor that cannot be ignored before buying an electric bike.

Observe local regulations

Ebike regulation is not as complicated as vehicles but there are still some rules that you need to follow. No license is required for riding an electric bike but there are speed limits. All electric bikes are categorized into 3 different classes as we have introduced many times. Depending on the class, the top speed of electric bikes is limited to 28mph. Besides these, some basic traffic rules, such as traffic lights, must also be followed.

Always take safety as your top priority

Make sure the braking force of the brake matches the motor. If you like being speedy, having a bike with hydraulic disc brakes is a must. Smart cut-off brakes ensure smooth stops and restarts to avoid kicks on the ride.

Useful suspension on the seat and frame helps maintain a smooth ride on rough roads, reducing fatigue and possibly back pain. It is strongly recommended to wear a helmet when driving an electric moped or electric bike. Ebikes with integrated reflectors and lights will come in handy if you prefer riding at night. Never forget to keep your front and rear headlights on in the dark and wear proper safety gear such as helmets and pads. Some may argue these are not necessary but when the accident is unavoidable, they certainly are.

Electric bikes are cut-edge electric vehicle that allows people to get around while reducing their carbon footprint and car congestion. Unlike a car, you don't have to spend a penny on fuel while the gas price is so high right now. All you need is electricity and a little pedal effort, and you will be good to go. It's mandatory to know what to look for when purchasing an ebike before shopping as it is able to assist you to find the best ebike for your lifestyle.

The purpose of your ebike

Fat tire electric bikes come in a variety of designs to match different purposes and lifestyles. A mountain bike’s power system makes climbing steep hills effortlessly. It has fat tires and includes studded shocks to support rough terrain and trails. These components make it a top choice for sports and outdoor recreation.

Folding ebikes are less heavier and more like traditional bikes, suitable for commuting and riding in urban areas. While recumbent bikes have a low seating level and a design that provides back support for people who have difficulty balancing, cargo bikes have carriers that make them useful for short-distance deliveries and for carrying groceries and other items.

Choose your riding posture

Your ebike’s frame geometry determines how comfortable your ebike is, and the best way to find out your preference is to have a try. Aspects to think about include the uprightness of the riding posture and the style of the frame.

Race bikes and some mountain bikes will have you leaning forward, while commuter ebikes and road ebikes permit a more upright riding posture that most people are comfortable with. In regard to the frame style, the ebike can have a traditional or step-by-step frame construction. The latter lacks a top tube to eliminate the hassle of stepping over it. The step-by-step frame allows for easier installation and removal, an appealing feature for riders traveling with cargo.

This may be the most frequent reason why regular bike riders switch to electric bikes. Throttle the bike engages the motor whether you're pedaling or not, whereas with the pedal-assist option the motor only engages when you're pedaling. One of the sensors used by pedal assist is a torque sensor, which evaluates your pedaling power, allowing the motor to provide appropriate power.

Final words

An electric bike is a big toy, it can accompany you through a lot of happiness. It will also be your most faithful companion, taking you through the congestion of the morning rush hour commute. However, as so many things need to be taken care of, serious consideration should be made before you own your first electric bike. Welcome to the Ebike World!
 
With the cadence option, the sensor recognizes how speedy the pedals are spinning and then applies motor force respectively, making pushing easier. The two sensors on the ebike offer various pedal assist modes to choose from, depending on whether you need more or less power.
Whether it's a cadence or a torque sensor if your ebike doesn't have a throttle it's a limited system most probably designed for a European-built ebike. It's best to have the option to choose which you want to use at any specific time while riding and much better when you have a throttle available also.

Both battery and motor determine range
Both devices are the most important parts of an electric bike. The ‘Range’ we talk about is the max distance after the battery is fully charged. Multiple elements that influence the range include rider weight, terrain, tire pressure, and pedaling aggression. Ebike specs directly related to the range are battery and motor type. The majority of electric bikes’ traveling ranges is from 30 to 80 miles. At the same time, electric bikes with a longer range will also affect the service life of the battery. Therefore, choosing a range that suits you is a factor that cannot be ignored before buying an electric bike.
I would argue that the bike frame itself is the key component of any ebike and the most important consideration... see how far you can ride without the bike itself. The motor and battery are simply components of an ebike. Range is a tricky thing to maximize and the points you mentioned are all pieces of the puzzle... but there are many many more, first and foremost the rider himself/herself. If range is your primary concern a fat-tire bike isn't the best choice... possibly the worse possible choice. Range is most linked to rolling resistance and rider input a bike that is easy to ride without the motor is going to excel at maximizing range. The size of the battery has nothing to do with its "service life" or the number of recharge cycles you can expect. It's how you treat the battery that matters. If you fully charge and fully discharge the battery you can expect the minimum number of recharge cycles before you start to notice a loss of performance and range. If you charge to 80-85% capacity and not discharge past 20% capacity you can triple the number of recharge cycles you can expect. That's why ebike manufacturers sell cheap low-end chargers that only charge to full capacity... they want you to buy new batteries. The key is having a battery that has more capacity than you normally need, something else that production ebike don't offer. What they will do is hang two small batteries on an ebike at twice the cost... pretty lame. A large battery has far more advantages than two smaller batteries.

Observe local regulations
Ebike regulation is not as complicated as vehicles but there are still some rules that you need to follow. No license is required for riding an electric bike but there are speed limits. All electric bikes are categorized into 3 different classes as we have introduced many times. Depending on the class, the top speed of electric bikes is limited to 28mph. Besides these, some basic traffic rules, such as traffic lights, must also be followed.
A Class-3 ebike can and does require a license to be legally ridden on roads in some locations (countries and states)... or can only be used as an off-road vehicle. ALL traffic rules apply to bicycles (standard and ebikes) in America, and riders must comply with them to ride legally. That said, someone riding a Class-3 ebike in a safe manner isn't going to have a problem unless either the Police or worse... an insurance company gets involved.

Always take safety as your top priority
Make sure ...
All the same safety considerations used for bicycles transfer directly over to ebikes... the "common sense" factor.

The purpose of your ebike
Fat tire electric bikes... mountain bike’s... folding ebikes... recumbent bikes...
The choice is usually... do you pick a one-trick pony like an MTB (a toy) or pick a bike that can handle the widest possible variety of purposes. Ebikes can be as much a tool as a "toy" for many riders. Try making grocery runs on a bike that doesn't or worse can't mount any type of rack, it's like trying to pick up a load of bricks in a Kia Rio.

Choose your riding posture
Your ebike’s frame geometry...
The "purpose of your ebike" and the "riding posture" go hand-in-hand. Again... is it just a toy, or is it also a tool. Understanding riding posture and frame geometry is what's most important and allows a rider to make an informed decision before spending money on an ebike that is better to discuss rather than to actually ride.

Final words
An electric bike is a big toy, it can accompany you through a lot of happiness. It will also be your most faithful companion, taking you through the congestion of the morning rush hour commute. However, as so many things need to be taken care of, serious consideration should be made before you own your first electric bike. Welcome to the Ebike World!
The weakest link in almost every low-end production ebike is the bike itself. Cheap heavy frames that are designed to be produced and sold inexpensively rather than designed to be ridden. An ebike can be so much more than just a toy... but your "faithful companion" can also be an amazing pain in the ass, and expensive unless you know how to maintain and service it yourself, both in the garage and on the side of the trail. Even more so when purchased online without any possible service support. Ride it like you stole it and it's going to be in a landfill in a couple of years. It's amazing how many riders don't even have the capability to repair a flat while riding, and more so how many have never practiced it. Another aspect of ebike ownership is that many (most) local bike shops (LBS) won't work on random ebikes, and most don't have any understanding of the motor or the electrical system whatsoever... times are changing in this regard but very very slowly.

Ride safe Kayla.
 
Thank you Kayla and BBassett. Very good points.

My wife and I are researching and will buy ebikes in the near future. We have two main "purposes" in mind. First and foremost is that when we retire (in 2024) we want comfortable ebikes to ride the many longer bike trails around the USA and Canada. We are members of the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (railstotrails.org) and we are familiarizing ourselves with all the trail options. We already are planning the 242 mile long Katy Trail across the state of Missouri. Both of us are in decent shape and 40 mile rides on regular bikes are within our range. We think that with a comfortable ebike, this range might increase to 55-65 miles. However, we also want the functionality of running errands around town to save gas by not driving our SUV. Thus we would like a rack on the back for that purpose.

What bikes do you recommend for us? We are okay with up to $2,500 each if the bikes meet these criteria.
 
Hi Ronnie,

I‘m pretty new to ebiking myself and don’t really have familiarity with all of the many, many brands out there. All I can do is share what I know about my own ebike, which might suit your needs.

My Aventon Pace 500 has been a joy to ride, and would likely work well for your intents.

First, it’s upright geometry makes it very comfortable for pleasurable biking. Nice on the back and just for taking rides in the country. The bike also allows for adjusting the height of the handlebars to best fit your comfort (something which I guess many ebikes don’t offer).

Its 500 W motor will easily get you up any hills you encounter on you journeys, and the battery has nice longevity for the treks you are looking at. I think the farthest I have gone at once was about 35 miles, but I had about 20% battery charge still left after that.

The bike easily accepts a rear rack which you can get from Aventon which is very sturdy once installed. I also put company brand fenders on mine.

I use mine almost daily for work commute now, and when I get home from work, all I want to do is get back on it. It’s great for taking on rides to the market, etc.

The integrated lights will help keep you safe on the road.

The wheels are not “fat” but are wide enough to handle some gentle off roading (I have no issues riding through a grassy park for instance) but not so wide as to make road riding less enjoyable. They are nicely robust, I would say.

With the bike, rear rack and fenders, you will be at about $2,000.

Aventon tends to be a well reviewed brand, but there have been reports of poor customer service after the sale. I have not come across that (yet) fortunately.

Good luck, and congratulations on your pending retirements!

~Shawn
 

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Thank you Kayla and BBassett. Very good points.

My wife and I are researching and will buy ebikes in the near future. We have two main "purposes" in mind. First and foremost is that when we retire (in 2024) we want comfortable ebikes to ride the many longer bike trails around the USA and Canada. We are members of the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (railstotrails.org) and we are familiarizing ourselves with all the trail options. We already are planning the 242 mile long Katy Trail across the state of Missouri. Both of us are in decent shape and 40 mile rides on regular bikes are within our range. We think that with a comfortable ebike, this range might increase to 55-65 miles. However, we also want the functionality of running errands around town to save gas by not driving our SUV. Thus we would like a rack on the back for that purpose.

What bikes do you recommend for us? We are okay with up to $2,500 each if the bikes meet these criteria.
Thanks for your support!
I have a Magicycle cruiser pro which is an newly upgraded ebike, I'm a long distance and mountain biking enthusiast, and I have ride it for or half a year, which is super comfortable. It can support my long rides, not sure if it's the best, but I think it's the most suitable for me with the reasonable price (I bought it singlely, if you and your wife buy it togather, you can check out their combo, the price is even better and cheaper, and as far as I know, they have a lot of discounts) and good performance. I see your needs and I think this ebike is also very suitable for you. I will list the specific parameters below:

Battery: 52V 20Ah Lithium Battery (LG), which support me to ride for a long distance.

Motor: 750W 52V Torque96 N.m rear geared hub motor (peaks at over 1,000W)

Brakes: Tektro Hydraulic disc brakes (180 mm rotors). The brakes works well when i over the hills.

Fork: Hydraulic suspension fork

Top speed: 28 mph (45 km/h)

Range: Up to 80 miles, of course, range varies with weight, terrain, wind speed, and your pedaling.

Weight: 73 lb

Max load: 350 lb

Wheels: Kenda26"x4.0" fat tires

Recommended Rider Heights: 5.5’’ ~ 6.5’’, I'm 5.8", it's comfortable to ride with it.

Extras: the Magicycle Cruiser pro provides color LCD display with USB charging, bright headlight, and taillight.
The ebike is not only suitable for commuter but also the perfect e-bike for trail riding and scenic cruising.

Another important point I need to mention is that it is more important to choose a brand with its own factory. I did some research on magicycle and found that they have their own factory and their customer service team is very responsible. I often have some questions about bicycle performance and other aspects, they can provide me with professional answers in time. That's what makes me highly recommend them.

They also have other models that you can check out too. Hope these are helpful to you. Welcome to join the riding groups~

Attach the pictures of my "friend"!!
 

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Hi Ronnie,

I‘m pretty new to ebiking myself and don’t really have familiarity with all of the many, many brands out there. All I can do is share what I know about my own ebike, which might suit your needs.

My Aventon Pace 500 has been a joy to ride, and would likely work well for your intents.

First, it’s upright geometry makes it very comfortable for pleasurable biking. Nice on the back and just for taking rides in the country. The bike also allows for adjusting the height of the handlebars to best fit your comfort (something which I guess many ebikes don’t offer).

Its 750W motor will easily get you up any hills you encounter on you journeys, and the battery has nice longevity for the treks you are looking at. I think the farthest I have gone at once was about 35 miles, but I had about 20% battery charge still left after that.

The bike easily accepts a rear rack which you can get from Aventon which is very sturdy once installed. I also put company brand fenders on mine.

I use mine almost daily for work commute now, and when I get home from work, all I want to do is get back on it. It’s great for taking on rides to the market, etc.

The integrated lights will help keep you safe on the road.

The wheels are not “fat” but are wide enough to handle some gentle off roading (I have no issues riding through a grassy park for instance) but not so wide as to make road riding less enjoyable. They are nicely robust, I would say.

With the bike, rear rack and fenders, you will be at about $2,000.

Aventon tends to be a well reviewed brand, but there have been reports of poor customer service after the sale. I have not come across that (yet) fortunately.

Good luck, and congratulations on your pending retirements!

~Shawn
`Thank you Shawn. This is good info. I just watched this video on your Aventon Pace 500 and it seems like a very good choice.
 
Glad to help, Ronnie!

I would check it out, and maybe a few other brands, and if possible see if you can take one for a test ride at your local bike shop.

I gambled on mine without the test drive, as my local store was out of stock early this summer, but I‘m glad I did.
 
Thank you Snoop. How would you consider your riding style? Are you more of a urban commuter or a cruiser (longer rides on trails, often asphalt), or a mountain biker? I think I'll make a poll in this forum and ask that question. Might be interesting to see a cross-section of the type of riding that most people do.
 
Thank you Kayla and BBassett. Very good points.

My wife and I are researching and will buy ebikes in the near future. We have two main "purposes" in mind. First and foremost is that when we retire (in 2024) we want comfortable ebikes to ride the many longer bike trails around the USA and Canada. We are members of the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (railstotrails.org) and we are familiarizing ourselves with all the trail options. We already are planning the 242 mile long Katy Trail across the state of Missouri. Both of us are in decent shape and 40 mile rides on regular bikes are within our range. We think that with a comfortable ebike, this range might increase to 55-65 miles. However, we also want the functionality of running errands around town to save gas by not driving our SUV. Thus we would like a rack on the back for that purpose.

What bikes do you recommend for us? We are okay with up to $2,500 each if the bikes meet these criteria.
Ronnie, I bought aSpecialized Creo last year. I love it. 75 mi range. You get what you pay for.
 
I would like to add to this thread;

Just because you know how to ride a bicycle, do not assume that you automatically know how to ride an eBike. There are features, quirks, and techniques that need to be learned and getting through that learning curve should happen in a large, empty lot before you try riding in traffic or at a busy trail or park.

Take the time (a few hours at minimum) to practice and become comfortable riding and maneuvering BEFORE you head out into the bigger world. Making a mistake on an eBike moving at 15-20+mph has consequences far more akin to what happens when riding a full blown motorcycle.
 
Thank you Kayla and BBassett. Very good points.

My wife and I are researching and will buy ebikes in the near future. We have two main "purposes" in mind. First and foremost is that when we retire (in 2024) we want comfortable ebikes to ride the many longer bike trails around the USA and Canada. We are members of the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (railstotrails.org) and we are familiarizing ourselves with all the trail options. We already are planning the 242 mile long Katy Trail across the state of Missouri. Both of us are in decent shape and 40 mile rides on regular bikes are within our range. We think that with a comfortable ebike, this range might increase to 55-65 miles. However, we also want the functionality of running errands around town to save gas by not driving our SUV. Thus we would like a rack on the back for that purpose.

What bikes do you recommend for us? We are okay with up to $2,500 each if the bikes meet these criteria.
I can't recommend a specific bike. But. The biggest mistake by far is getting a ebike that is severely under battery.
Your ambitious agenda in the future kind of rules out most bikes around 2500.00. Keeping in mind that a battery that gives you comfortable range is 700.00 alone!. Then bikes at that price won't have Hydrolic brakes or decent suspension. There is alot of manufacturers that source parts. Derailur, breaks, motors, displays, headsets, seats.
The thing that you will notice most is batteries, motors, comfort. Then there is how the power is applied. Does the motor use rotation of the pedal or does it recognize the effort your requesting. Does the motor become invisible to your riding or does it dominate.
Bikes with bafang motors in that price range take a bit to start applying assistance and are late stopping assistance when you stop pedaling. Are you going to get 30 miles between charges or 140? Battery size really matter especially if wanting to do 30 mile rides. Is your path flat or hilly? Bosch motors are exceptional for smooth power and have advanced software to get the most range while providing really great support. There is many many used ebikes on the market that originally cost your budget. People were not as enamored as they thought they would be. They found a limited range and poor hill performance. Most bikes in all price ranges fair pretty well in regards to maintenance. It when you start to understand the things that really matter is when you need to reevaluate your budget

Any bike I would buy
1 at least a 750w motor
2 uses a torque sensor
3 Hydrolic brakes. Bike is heavy
4 high quality motors that ALL bike shops work on.
5 belt drive if possible.
Belts last longer, quiet, smooth
6 has Derailur that covers a wide band of gears.
7 both front and rear suspension. I don't mountain ride but a smooth ride will allow you to ride longer.

You will double your miles when you get a quality ebike.
 
Buddy and I both have E bikes with the Bosch powertrain (got mine because he liked his). They are utterly seamless in operation, and offer perhaps an 80 mile range on bike trails.
Our bikes are of different manufacture (mines a Trek), but share features like disc brakes.
Dan
 
All depends on your riding desires......I love my Lectric XP 2.0 folding ebike......it's perfect for me. I ride for exercise every night....about 4 to 7 miles.....I can go about 20 to 25 miles without a charge. I can easily take the bike camping when we go. The bike is very well made for the price. I ride mostly hills...weigh 230lbs......the bike is very comfortable. Quality is in the eye of the beholder.....so is price. For the money.....my ebike is perfect for my style of riding.
 
That's awesome. I enjoy hearing about how much people like there particular bikes. Everyone has different needs for the bikes they chose.

I read alot of good reviews on the lectric.
 
A mistake I made was buying two very heavy e-bikes that were cheap but required a special expensive bike rack with a motorcycle ramp to transport and this was far from ideal. I replaced the 70 lb e-bikes with Class III road bikes that weigh only 27 lbs and this made transporting them much easier and also made riding more fun.

On our regular bikes we ride at speeds of 15-25 mph and with the Class III bikes that is still possible. No cutting out of the motor at around 18 mph and having it feel like the brakes are being applied.

The new bikes also have regular size bike tires so no issues with needing special tools to remove the wheel with a flat and special tire irons to remove the tire from the wheel and replace the tube. Many more tire options with our new road bikes.

REI is a great place to find an e-bike with normal tires and good range and good customer support and pay less than $3,000.
 
I have a wtva fat tire folding step thru (vtuvia is another copycat ,along with others ) Both brands are made by vtuvia . Both bikes are built with easy to get and replace parts bought most places.after 18 months my only problem was the noisy brakes .so I bought some cable pull hydraulic calipers for $42.00 and no more brake noise and better stopping power, I weight 250 and the 750 watt motor along with pedal assist has got me up some steep hills .I try to avoid brands that have proprietary items like the batteries that go into the frame.Because you are at their mercy when it craps out.my bike battery is readily avable from many sellers.Questions I have had about my bike were answered within a couple of hours.for $1299.00 I believe I made a great choice and very happy with my bike.another copycat is rattan but have read that their customer service is poor.Lets go brandon
 
Check out the Lectric XPremium, dual batteries, long range, hydraulic brakes, comfortable mid drive folding bike.
 
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