Recumbent eBikes (not trikes) are rare as hen's teeth, eh?

Smaug

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When I search for a recumbent eBike, there are precious few, and the ones available are multi-thousand dollars.

I read an article on sports injuries yesterday that suggests perineal pressure is a serious health concern. This is inevitable on traditional upright bicycles. (though there are ways to control it)

I know they're more complicated and take more materials than a traditional bike, but even so, I feel like we should have some options below $2k. Seems like it's an unfilled niche.
 

Smaug

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Since you replied only seconds after I posted, I know you didn't read the article to which I linked.
A lot of cyclists, especially long-distance ones, seem to have problems related to long-term perineal pressure.
 

Smaug

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Not all recumbents are low. Trikes are the lowest, since the rider usually sits between two of the wheels. At least 50% of the time recumbent riders sail an orange flag to help with visibility.

That's true.

I wouldn't say it is a "poor frame design", it just has different priorities. It spreads the load of the rider across a much wider area, and allows the rider to pedal against his back instead of just gravity, so he can have more power for "free". It sacrifices compactness, lightness, and cargo-carrying capability for these strengths; it's classical design compromise. If you don't care about those advantages, that's fine, but you don't need to put it down just because it's not for you.
 

"A"

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Wife & I have been riding recumbents since 2003, after returning to cycling from an injury.
I started with a $400 recumbent that was found on local Craigslist.
In 2004, I found two SWB, USS Vison R40 recumbents on separate Craigslist ads, under $500 each.
It took me about 500 miles on a recumbent to develop my recumbent legs, specific group of muscles that allows me to pedal smoothly, be more efficient on climbs.
For any ride that's longer than 2 hours of saddle time, I prefer riding a recumbent over an upright, diamond framed bicycle.
Recumbents are just more comfortable and when you finish the ride there are far less aches & sores.


Diamond framed bicycles outnumber recumbent probably ten million to one worldwide, for that reason the bicycle manufacturers don't like to mass produce them.
Once a production run is over, factories don't usually retool for something that doesn't take off in the market.
Shipping cost for odd sized recumbent boxes are also costly to manufacturers.
More than likely, when major bicycle manufacturers (TREK & Cannondale) try their hands in recumbent, they usually lose money in every single one they sold.
When bike production require intensive labor & tooling; even if you have the means to produce the (recumbent) bikes, but profit is still not there when compared to regular bicycles.
Hence the low availability of recumbents in the market.

Wife & I enjoy our Vision R40 so much, I converted them from USS to OSS, take up less storage room and more intuitive steering.
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Back in 2008, I found two Bike Friday SatRDay recumbents at about 1/2 of their original cost.
They each fold down and pack into their own suitcase.
The suit cases actually convert into trailers that gets pulled behind the recumbents.
We took these recumbents with us while traveling overseas.
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Over the years wife & I have gone to recumbent rallies, HPV speed record attempts in Death Valley.
We've sampled many different types of recumbent bikes & trikes.
We even got ourselves a semi-recumbent tandem in 2008.
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Wife & I still ride our Vision R40 recumbents about 400-500 miles a year, mostly on longer (60+ mile) rides.
It's a great feeling about a long ride, you get off your recumbent and still be able to function, drink & party; while riders on upright bikes seem more tired.
Bike Friday recumbent don't get ridden as much since COVID, we have not felt the need to travel overseas with our recumbents.

I have not felt the need to convert a recumbent into a ebike, but I think I will just wait a few years for better tech to come out.

If you have questions about recumbents, let me know if I can be at any help.
 
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