Recommendation Needed: Lectric XP 1.0->?

gadgetfreak

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After a lot of research last year, I decided to get two Lectric Bikes for me (6'2") and my wife (5'3"). We live in the suburbs of Long Island, NY. To date, we have ridden them only a handful of time. After a serious discussion, we determined why we weren't so keen on these bikes:



1) They don't feel like regular bikes. I am not sure if it is the wheel size, the weight, etc. My wife doesn't feel like she has enough control.

2) The motor kicking in and out is difficult for her to control. It is also very noisy.

3) They don't look like regular bikes and, since ebikes are not so popular here, it invites too many stares.



When we visit places like Washington DC, we have no problems with the Lime e-bikes.



So we are going to sell these two bikes and I want to get new ones that address the above issues. I would like to stay in the $1k-$2k range for each. I have seen reviews of the Radmission and Ride1Up (they have a few possible versions). The problem is that there is no place to test drive these bikes and, although the companies say free returns, I wonder how easy it would be to build it, test it, and then send it back.



I am also concerned because so many reviews LOVED the Lectric XP. And I don't :(. How can I know which bikes address the above issues and would be the right choice?
 
Welcome to the forum!

What do you primarily plan to use the bikes for? What is most important to you?

I noticed you posted in the Commuter Bike sub forum. If you are looking to ride mostly on paved asphalt and you would like a comfortable upright geometry, I‘ve been very happy with my Aventon Pace 500. It has nice sized tires (not “fat”) which can do light off-roading but feels great on blacktop and handles well. I feel the motor engagement is nice and smooth, and I do not feel a jolt. Also, if you’re looking to “blend in” a bit, with its integrated components/battery is appears very similar to a regular bike.

Definitely check out other brands too and do a little due diligence about what matters most to you and your wife. I agree with trying to test ride if possible, and if you can purchase from a local bike shop, even better (for better support needs should they arise). My LBS does carry Aventon bikes, but it’s about 450 miles from you, so likely not a good option. :) I noticed that Best Buy now carries Aventon bikes as well, but not sure if they offer test riding there.

Good luck!
 
Thanks for the response. I guess I would say I am looking for a comfort/hybrid style bike. I have back problems and an upright position is helpful. I didn't see a sub-section for that and I guess I misunderstood commuter vs. comfort. I don't like the look of a beach cruiser for the suburbs.

We mostly just want to do leisurely riding in the neighboorhood on asphalt. Nothing fancy. I will check out your recommendation. It is sad because most places dont seem to sell the popular online models like I mentioned.
 
What did you finally buy? I just bought a pair of XP2.0s and agree with some of the things you said, mainly that they don't ride like regular bikes. But I think a part of that is the size of the wheels and the different center of gravity compared to other bikes. The bike's center of gravity seems to be lower than regular bikes but you still need the seat to be high enough to get the correct leg extension. That makes the bike feel different and slightly harder to balance on.

If you're not able to get used to this I'd consider an ebike with full size wheels and frame geometry that is closer to that of a regular bike.

As for inviting too many stares, I'm in San Diego where there are a lot of ebikes but these seem to stand out. I think they look better than most other ebikes and we've gotten a lot of curious and positive comments from neighbors. That said, I couldn't care less if people stare.
 
Everybody is different. I have a XP 2.0 and love riding it. I am 6'4" ad it fits me fine. I ride lots of hills and rural roads....some bike paths as well.......I love this bike......very sturdy......great control.......PA 1 most of the time.......I love that it folds up as well.....I take it camping.
 
What did you finally buy? I just bought a pair of XP2.0s and agree with some of the things you said, mainly that they don't ride like regular bikes. But I think a part of that is the size of the wheels and the different center of gravity compared to other bikes. The bike's center of gravity seems to be lower than regular bikes but you still need the seat to be high enough to get the correct leg extension. That makes the bike feel different and slightly harder to balance on.

If you're not able to get used to this I'd consider an ebike with full size wheels and frame geometry that is closer to that of a regular bike.

As for inviting too many stares, I'm in San Diego where there are a lot of ebikes but these seem to stand out. I think they look better than most other ebikes and we've gotten a lot of curious and positive comments from neighbors. That said, I couldn't care less if people stare.
I didn't buy anything yet. And I am soon going to post the two Lectric bikes for sale locally. I agree I need something that is more like a regular bike. Rad had a great deal on their Mission last month but I missed it. And I still don't like that I can't test out all of these bikes locally.
 
I didn't buy anything yet. And I am soon going to post the two Lectric bikes for sale locally. I agree I need something that is more like a regular bike. Rad had a great deal on their Mission last month but I missed it. And I still don't like that I can't test out all of these bikes locally.
It seems like your best bet would be Amazon so your return issues wouldn't be a problem
 
You get what you pay for. If you only want to spend $1,000 - $2,000 you will get e bikes with limited features' Go to a good local bike store that sells e bikes and chat with the manager. Describe what you are looking for and listen to the advice you get. Buying e bikes on-lin (like buying anything on-line) is only great if you know exactly what you are looking for. Also, there is a world of difference between cyclists and people who ride bikes. Which are you?
 
Hi gadgetfreak, did you do anything yet? If not, see below.

After a lot of research last year, I decided to get two Lectric Bikes for me (6'2") and my wife (5'3"). We live in the suburbs of Long Island, NY. To date, we have ridden them only a handful of time. After a serious discussion, we determined why we weren't so keen on these bikes:



1) They don't feel like regular bikes. I am not sure if it is the wheel size, the weight, etc. My wife doesn't feel like she has enough control.
I had a similar eBike (heybike Ranger) and my wife wasn't comfortable on it either. She's 5'2"; said it was too heavy, despite the lower center of mass.

2) The motor kicking in and out is difficult for her to control. It is also very noisy.
That just takes some getting used to, if you want them to be affordable. (cadence sensing) If you don't want to wait and get used to that, you'll be forced to open up the ol' wallet and get something with a torque sensor arrangement. $2k ea. will just barely do it.

3) They don't look like regular bikes and, since ebikes are not so popular here, it invites too many stares.


When we visit places like Washington DC, we have no problems with the Lime e-bikes.
I was there recently and saw them, but didn't think to look what kind of arrangement they had. I think they are hybrid with torque sensing cranks and hub motors.

So we are going to sell these two bikes and I want to get new ones that address the above issues. I would like to stay in the $1k-$2k range for each. I have seen reviews of the Radmission and Ride1Up (they have a few possible versions). The problem is that there is no place to test drive these bikes and, although the companies say free returns, I wonder how easy it would be to build it, test it, and then send it back.
I just bought an Aventon Level.2, which meets all your requirements except that it does have a forward lean. They make a Pace 350 and Pace 500 that are more upright, but they don't have the somewhat exotic torque sensing that would make them feel more natural to you and your wife.

Based on what you said, I think the Aventon Pace 350 would be a good choice for you two, and you will just have to get used to the cadence sensing power assist arrangement. Give it some time. Learn how it works. They have step-through and step-over versions.

I am also concerned because so many reviews LOVED the Lectric XP. And I don't :(. How can I know which bikes address the above issues and would be the right choice?
Well, you want something with upright frame geometry; that's pretty easy.
You also want something that looks like a conventional mechanical hybrid bike. That's pretty easy too. Eliminate all folders with 20" wheels. Look for at least 26" wheels, 70cm is more common. You'll either have to deal with a fat downtube to house the battery or a battery that's visible under a rear rack or on a frame tube. No way around that, especially in your budget.

I'm surprised that in NYC, you can't find a local shop that sells eBikes. I've found my local small city shops stock Trek and this one Dutch-looking brand and they start just at the high end of your budget. They are mostly mid-drive with torque sensing, but they do have some hub motor models.
 
Hi gadgetfreak, did you do anything yet? If not, see below.


I had a similar eBike (heybike Ranger) and my wife wasn't comfortable on it either. She's 5'2"; said it was too heavy, despite the lower center of mass.


That just takes some getting used to, if you want them to be affordable. (cadence sensing) If you don't want to wait and get used to that, you'll be forced to open up the ol' wallet and get something with a torque sensor arrangement. $2k ea. will just barely do it.


I was there recently and saw them, but didn't think to look what kind of arrangement they had. I think they are hybrid with torque sensing cranks and hub motors.


I just bought an Aventon Level.2, which meets all your requirements except that it does have a forward lean. They make a Pace 350 and Pace 500 that are more upright, but they don't have the somewhat exotic torque sensing that would make them feel more natural to you and your wife.

Based on what you said, I think the Aventon Pace 350 would be a good choice for you two, and you will just have to get used to the cadence sensing power assist arrangement. Give it some time. Learn how it works. They have step-through and step-over versions.


Well, you want something with upright frame geometry; that's pretty easy.
You also want something that looks like a conventional mechanical hybrid bike. That's pretty easy too. Eliminate all folders with 20" wheels. Look for at least 26" wheels, 70cm is more common. You'll either have to deal with a fat downtube to house the battery or a battery that's visible under a rear rack or on a frame tube. No way around that, especially in your budget.

I'm surprised that in NYC, you can't find a local shop that sells eBikes. I've found my local small city shops stock Trek and this one Dutch-looking brand and they start just at the high end of your budget. They are mostly mid-drive with torque sensing, but they do have some hub motor models.
I bought and returned an Aventon Level.2 because it leaned forward and my 73-year-old back didn’t like that. I bought the Aventon Aventure.2 with torque sensor and fat tires and it sits up straighter and I love it. You can test out Aventon bikes in lots of places. Just do the dealer map in their site. It’s heavy but I really don’t notice that while riding.
 
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