New Aventon Aventure with throttle Lag

Aventurer

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like my new Aventure Aventure, but the lag from throttle on or start of pedal is WAY TO LONG! For the throttle it takes 3-4 seconds to feel the motor start to kick in. And it takes 1 1/2 rotations of the pedal to feel any assist. That may not sound like much, but it makes the bike feel sluggish and unresponsive. Is there anything that can be done to make my new bike more responsive? I’d consider changing out components if that’s what it would take. Or hacking into the sofeware. Thoughts…

Does it have to do with the crank sensor vs force sensor on other bikes?
Is it just the way the controller is programed?
Would a different throttle make a difference?
Am I expecting too much from this level of ebike
 
in order

No,
Yes,
Only a pricey one, and then not entirely,
Maybe, maybe not
 
like my new Aventure Aventure, but the lag from throttle on or start of pedal is WAY TO LONG! For the throttle it takes 3-4 seconds to feel the motor start to kick in. And it takes 1 1/2 rotations of the pedal to feel any assist. That may not sound like much, but it makes the bike feel sluggish and unresponsive. Is there anything that can be done to make my new bike more responsive? I’d consider changing out components if that’s what it would take. Or hacking into the sofeware. Thoughts…

Does it have to do with the crank sensor vs force sensor on other bikes?
Is it just the way the controller is programed?
Would a different throttle make a difference?
Am I expecting too much from this level of ebike
Do you mean a Aventon Aventure? I just answered another question I think from you on another forum.

This is not normal operation. You need to contact the aventon company as there is no programming info I have been able to find on YouTube or other internet sources.

I have to ask why would even consider changing components before contacting the seller or mfg of the bike?
 
like my new Aventure Aventure, but the lag from throttle on or start of pedal is WAY TO LONG! For the throttle it takes 3-4 seconds to feel the motor start to kick in. And it takes 1 1/2 rotations of the pedal to feel any assist. That may not sound like much, but it makes the bike feel sluggish and unresponsive. Is there anything that can be done to make my new bike more responsive? I’d consider changing out components if that’s what it would take. Or hacking into the sofeware. Thoughts…

Does it have to do with the crank sensor vs force sensor on other bikes?
Is it just the way the controller is programed?
Would a different throttle make a difference?
Am I expecting too much from this level of ebike
1.5 crank revolutions is normal for a cadence sensored, rear hub motored ebike, Your cadence is zero (0) until you complete one full revolution.

And it's a bicycle - who really buys a bicycle to rely the throttle anyway? I have ~550 miles on my Aventure now and have yet to bother with the throttle. If I wanted to depend on a throttle, I'd have purchased a motorcycle.

Set up as a Level 2 bike, using PAS 3 and 4, I'm getting over 100 miles per charge ~15-16 mph average over 70% flat/30% hilly terrain. That far exceeds my range expectations and Aventon's own "real world" estimates with the bike set up as a Level 3 bike. It blows my mind that I can do 18 low effort miles to my favorite trailhead, hike 7-8 miles, then backtrack 18 miles home, and use only 15-18% of the battery charge.

One possibility is that your brakes may not be set up correctly. It's pretty common for the brakes on ship-to-customer-for-assembly bikes to be maladjusted. If the bike thinks the brake is being applied there's a switch that cuts the motor. You might have a look and make sure your braked aren't rubbing and the levers are returning to open when released.

Good luck sorting out your issues though the crank rotation to boost engagement sounds pretty normal. Oh, and the bike is heavy, but if you shift into an easier gear as you're coming to a stop, it's very easy to get the bike going without needing instant electric motor engagement.
 
ANy luck with this I feel like I am having the same problem. Takes a little while for motor to kick in on heavier bike
 
I purchased mine from a local dealer and when I demo ride the step through and high step. They behaved in same manner also throttle cuts out at 20 mph.
Mine is 2019 model maybe newer Aventons particularly Aventure model is different programming.
I @Aventurer bike has a lag take it to shop.
Mine has a pretty long lag as well. At least it seems like it when you are trying to cross a bust road :) Mine will take off from a dead stop, but there is still a lag. I've only had mine for a few days.
 
Throttle "lag" is common and normal. First, there is a delay, second, 40-60% of the throttle travel is absolutely dead or non-responsive.

The "delay" in the pedal sensor is reasonable and a safety feature. Sitting at a stop, a fair amount of pedal rotation is fairly common and having the motor react to this "instantly" would be a major safety problem.

Better quality throttles can eliminate much of the "dead zone" in throttle travel. Programmable controllers can allow for faster reaction to throttle input, as well as pedal sensor input. Be default, and where programming is not available, the delay is considered valuable and necessary for user safety.

Now, the condition mentioned by one user of no throttle at all when not moving is NOT a common condition. However, if someone is at a dead stop, then floors the throttle and starts pedaling at the same time, the delay in activating the motor from throttle input would appear to support the concept of no throttle until moving. What is really happening, I believe, is that while the two are not connected, they just seem to be due to coincidence.
 
It's normal and a safety feature to have lag and no acceleration from a stop? What are you smoking? It's not normal to have a motor that has no response at a stop. I have many ebikes and non of mine behave this way.
As far as a safety feature. Is there any studies that confirm this? As a fact not being able to accelerate from a stop in normal street traffic is more dangerous. This bike weighs 70+ lbs. It's not like you can compare it to a acoustic bike at 20 lbs where most can get the acoustic bike moving even if in the wrong gear. Additionally if on a trail and need to stop suddenly it's likely you are in the wrong gear. Remember your on a very heavy bike. You need movement to down shif. It's going to be a huge frustration. If I had 1000 + watts with a pedal and thumb throttle and I can't use any of that that bike would go back. It's not normal and to say it's a feature your just trying to justify a poor purchase decision.
Bafang motors can be quite sunny. Because the bike does not have a torque sensor it needs to rely on other forms of input off the start.
The delay in throttle is a company thing.
For a mountain bike look elsewhere or learn how to modify the torque curve. I know this bafang motor can provide power from a dead stop. It's because of the manufacturer you can't have this
 
It's normal and a safety feature to have lag and no acceleration from a stop? What are you smoking? It's not normal to have a motor that has no response at a stop. I have many ebikes and non of mine behave this way.
As far as a safety feature. Is there any studies that confirm this? As a fact not being able to accelerate from a stop in normal street traffic is more dangerous. This bike weighs 70+ lbs. It's not like you can compare it to a acoustic bike at 20 lbs where most can get the acoustic bike moving even if in the wrong gear. Additionally if on a trail and need to stop suddenly it's likely you are in the wrong gear. Remember your on a very heavy bike. You need movement to down shif. It's going to be a huge frustration. If I had 1000 + watts with a pedal and thumb throttle and I can't use any of that that bike would go back. It's not normal and to say it's a feature your just trying to justify a poor purchase decision.
Bafang motors can be quite sunny. Because the bike does not have a torque sensor it needs to rely on other forms of input off the start.
The delay in throttle is a company thing.
For a mountain bike look elsewhere or learn how to modify the torque curve. I know this bafang motor can provide power from a dead stop. It's because of the manufacturer you can't have this

My understanding of this is as follows.
  • The pedal assist delay is a safety feature
    • I actually like this. In fact, I’m pretty obsessive about thumbing my PAS down to 0 when I’m at intersections. It could be catastrophic if a little inadvertent leverage on a pedal while waiting caused my bike to shoot out into the road unexpectedly.
    • In contrast to the 1 1/2 pedal revolutions mentioned in “Aventurer”’s OP, I only have to pedal about 1/2 rotation on my Pace 500 before the motor engages
  • The throttle assist delay is (was) a safety feature
    • The ebike has a very powerful motor and many ebike riders are elderly or have physical limitations. This was to help keep the bike from jolting out from underneath them. It also helped prevent the bike from taking off while being walked or leaned on.
  • A lot of people did not like this and complained to Aventon.
    • The company listened to this feedback and changed its controller to allow full throttle from stop. The user manual clearly states, however, that for safety purposes they recommend pedaling before throttling
    • There continues to be a pedal assist delay for safety purposes, but riders now have the option to gently throttle the bike forward to gain momentum before pedaling. I’ve tried it, and it works great. You can also pedal up from a lower gear if preferred
    • New bikes from Aventon currently have the updated controller. The controller also adjusted some comfort levels while in lower PAS settings.
    • Owners of older Aventons had, and possibly may still have, the option to have their controllers upgraded. I will link to that product in my following post.

That’s my understanding of it anyway. I might be wrong, but I hope it helps.
 
1.5 crank revolutions is normal for a cadence sensored, rear hub motored ebike, Your cadence is zero (0) until you complete one full revolution.

And it's a bicycle - who really buys a bicycle to rely the throttle anyway? I have ~550 miles on my Aventure now and have yet to bother with the throttle. If I wanted to depend on a throttle, I'd have purchased a motorcycle.

Set up as a Level 2 bike, using PAS 3 and 4, I'm getting over 100 miles per charge ~15-16 mph average over 70% flat/30% hilly terrain. That far exceeds my range expectations and Aventon's own "real world" estimates with the bike set up as a Level 3 bike. It blows my mind that I can do 18 low effort miles to my favorite trailhead, hike 7-8 miles, then backtrack 18 miles home, and use only 15-18% of the battery charge.

One possibility is that your brakes may not be set up correctly. It's pretty common for the brakes on ship-to-customer-for-assembly bikes to be maladjusted. If the bike thinks the brake is being applied there's a switch that cuts the motor. You might have a look and make sure your braked aren't rubbing and the levers are returning to open when released.

Good luck sorting out your issues though the crank rotation to boost engagement sounds pretty normal. Oh, and the bike is heavy, but if you shift into an easier gear as you're coming to a stop, it's very easy to get the bike going without needing instant electric motor engagement.
Agreed. I really have no use for the throttle. The only time I might use it is in a situation where I was out on a ride and sprained my ankle really bad and couldn't pedal. Other than that, I have no use for a throttle with the motor and drive-train my Evelo Atlas has.
 
Agreed. I really have no use for the throttle. The only time I might use it is in a situation where I was out on a ride and sprained my ankle really bad and couldn't pedal. Other than that, I have no use for a throttle with the motor and drive-train my Evelo Atlas has.

When I researched and purchased my Aventon, having a throttle was a must. Now that I’ve had it for 4 months and clocked my first 1,000 miles, aside from the maiden voyage around the block, I’ve really never needed it or used it.

Kind of a vestige on my handlebars.

It’s nice to have though, I guess, in case of injury, etc.
 
You all are missing the point of the adventure model. It is marketed as a mountain bike. Not your old geysers day scotter.. I'm not takling about having 80yo finger tremors where you can't control your fingers. Imagine being half way up a huge hill and you have to stop suddenly and your in 7th. No way no how are you going to pedal enough to get the motor running. And your no way going to shift to first while stationary. Aventon makes models for different people. But this bike is designed for off road. I personally don't like a company to decide for me how safe I need to be.
The main issue here is the choice of motor and the cheep parts. Going with a cadence sensor over a torque sensor is cost cutting. Bafang makes plenty of motors that have built in torque sensors and I don't hear about a ton of feeble minded seniors getting run over because they dumb thumbed a throttle.
 
I personally don't like a company to decide for me how safe I need to be.

The truth of the matter, unfortunately, is while a person can say that, the same person can turn around and sue the company for liability if they claim inadequate safety measures were taken. It’s a fine line.

As mentioned in my post above, however, the Aventure can now throttle fully from a dead stop.
 
Oh. I missed that. I wasn't trying to argue with you. I was venting over the shear stupidity. Auto manufacturers don't require the drivers to push b4 starting from a stop. They don't worry about someone dumb footing from a light. Why would a stupid safety feature like that be more important on a bike? If the bike manufacturers want extreme safety they would have secondary brakes, mandatory brake lights, roll bars, air bags on handle bars, no quick release wheels. You get my point.
I was almost set on purchasing the adventurer until I came across a review that said how the bike had no throttle control and it needed excessive rotation to get moving. It then became apparent that the bike has no torque sensor. It relied on rotation to start. Fine. Lots of bikes are like that but having a bit of throttle control negates that. I realize that this is a sub 2k bike and torque sensors are additional cost. But to come out with a bike marketed as a mountain capable with no assist from a dead stop is purely dumb. Then some reactions that defend aventon saying it's a safety feature got my blood boiling.
So it's apparent that the blog was older and at least some of the mountain restrictions are addressed. Still knowing that the adventurer doesn't use torque sensors it misses the mark for me. I was hopeful that I could get decent gravel, hill, street bike for a great price.
 
Oh. I missed that. I wasn't trying to argue with you. I was venting over the shear stupidity. Auto manufacturers don't require the drivers to push b4 starting from a stop. They don't worry about someone dumb footing from a light. Why would a stupid safety feature like that be more important on a bike? If the bike manufacturers want extreme safety they would have secondary brakes, mandatory brake lights, roll bars, air bags on handle bars, no quick release wheels. You get my point.
I was almost set on purchasing the adventurer until I came across a review that said how the bike had no throttle control and it needed excessive rotation to get moving. It then became apparent that the bike has no torque sensor. It relied on rotation to start. Fine. Lots of bikes are like that but having a bit of throttle control negates that. I realize that this is a sub 2k bike and torque sensors are additional cost. But to come out with a bike marketed as a mountain capable with no assist from a dead stop is purely dumb. Then some reactions that defend aventon saying it's a safety feature got my blood boiling.
So it's apparent that the blog was older and at least some of the mountain restrictions are addressed. Still knowing that the adventurer doesn't use torque sensors it misses the mark for me. I was hopeful that I could get decent gravel, hill, street bike for a great price.

No worries!

I have the Pace 500 which works great for my commuting and recreational rides. I don’t do any mountain biking, though, so I don’t have need for the sudden throttling, etc.

I checked out the Aventure at my LBS, and it’s a beast, size-wise. But probably didn’t have all the features somebody might want with aggressive riding, like what it sounds like you enjoy doing.

I’m definitely more of a “wimp” rider. ;)
 
I'm more of a wishful mountain rider. Your right about the bike not being up to the task especially at the price. I bought a riese and muller homage site unseen and was surprised to see how big it is. It will be a bit b4 I get accustomed to it enough to do any aggressive riding. I'm 20 in my head with a 60yo body. The Homage rides like a Bently and costs about the same. It has everything needed for both exceptional ride and moderate down hill riding.
Full fox suspension, rolhoff 14 speed hub, duel batteries, 85 NM torque, Hydrolic brakes, dropper seat. Everything needed for semi aggressive riding but it's big. I was looking to add another bike and considered this bike because it has the bafang motor. Otherwise I might just build one from scratch.
 
My Bentley
 

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