NEVER trust even a respected engineer, always re check

Pinhead

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BAD join in wires that should NOT have been joined in/on one bike and NO cable CLAMPSD on either

CHECK your bike

CLAMPS are 100% NEEDED as with ALL plugs they stop cables being pulled out
 

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Sorry to hear about the problems. I would be furious with that kinda work, or should I say from their poor connection choice. I dont think crimp butt connectors should be used on a ebike.

If a person has only that choice of connector, they should of at least have used Perma-Seal butt connectors.

Sorry to hear bout your problems.
 



WOW @Pinhead they didnt do a good job for you mate, clean it up and use these things up there and you can do it my friend ;)
 
It is a generational thing. Old school engineers designed and implemented prototypes of their design. They understood things like "strain relief" and "cable chaffing". They understood corrosion. They typically designed with the 200 percent rule (all components should be designed/rated to operate at twice the current/voltage the product was likely to see in use. Products were designed to allow them to be maintained and (if necessary) repaired with off the shelf parts.

Today, many engineers design, but it is the "engineering technician" who spots the functional flaws, makes the changes in design, to ensure its reliability. Accountants tell the young engineers to control costs, and take shortcuts which impact reliability.

And yes, I shuddered when I saw those yellow crimp connectors. For high current, all connections should be properly soldered, with thick shrink-wrap. If it is going to be exposed to weather, silicone sealant should be applied to the junction before sliding over the shrink wrap. This reduces the chance of seepage causing problems in the future.
 
It is a generational thing. Old school engineers designed and implemented prototypes of their design. They understood things like "strain relief" and "cable chaffing". They understood corrosion. They typically designed with the 200 percent rule (all components should be designed/rated to operate at twice the current/voltage the product was likely to see in use. Products were designed to allow them to be maintained and (if necessary) repaired with off the shelf parts.

Today, many engineers design, but it is the "engineering technician" who spots the functional flaws, makes the changes in design, to ensure its reliability. Accountants tell the young engineers to control costs, and take shortcuts which impact reliability.

And yes, I shuddered when I saw those yellow crimp connectors. For high current, all connections should be properly soldered, with thick shrink-wrap. If it is going to be exposed to weather, silicone sealant should be applied to the junction before sliding over the shrink wrap. This reduces the chance of seepage causing problems in the future.


The comment I got was "a cable clamp is not supplied as part of the fitting kit"

Well.. bloody make one then ....................
 
It is a generational thing. Old school engineers designed and implemented prototypes of their design. They understood things like "strain relief" and "cable chaffing". They understood corrosion. They typically designed with the 200 percent rule (all components should be designed/rated to operate at twice the current/voltage the product was likely to see in use. Products were designed to allow them to be maintained and (if necessary) repaired with off the shelf parts.

Today, many engineers design, but it is the "engineering technician" who spots the functional flaws, makes the changes in design, to ensure its reliability. Accountants tell the young engineers to control costs, and take shortcuts which impact reliability.

And yes, I shuddered when I saw those yellow crimp connectors. For high current, all connections should be properly soldered, with thick shrink-wrap. If it is going to be exposed to weather, silicone sealant should be applied to the junction before sliding over the shrink wrap. This reduces the chance of seepage causing problems in the future.
2 things aircraft grade crimp connectors are fine and some types of uncured silicone sealant are corrosive,sloppy works trumps these two
 
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