my1020

Murph

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Hello. Building my 1st ebike. My question is I have a motor 48 volt 1000 watt (my 1020 its called) It came with a YK31C speed controller. Im hoping to achieve 35 mph. will the speed controller restrict the speed I get?
 

spinnanz

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You will need far higher voltage to get 35mph. My 48v 800w bike that runs VERY narrow road race tires will only get about 25mph.
 

Hoggdoc

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Hello. Building my 1st ebike. My question is I have a motor 48 volt 1000 watt (my 1020 its called) It came with a YK31C speed controller. Im hoping to achieve 35 mph. will the speed controller restrict the speed I get?
Yes the controller could limit the amount of amps delivered to the motor which would control the torque the motor produces. But all brushless motors are limited by the KV of their windings. KV stands for kilovolts which translates to how many RPM the motor will turn for volt power applied.

For your motor to develop 1000 W of power with a 48 V battery the controller would need to allow at least 21 A to be provided to the motor. Most controllers have a speed sensor input and the controller could limit the speed the bike and run. You really need to know how flexible the controller and display are at providing you with a means to adjust the settings. The settings you look for our maximum speed and current.
 

Nelson37

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That motor is almost certainly sold in multiple versions, for which the primary (likely only) difference is the specific speed they will reach on a given voltage, the KV Hoggdoc referenced above.

It might be 20mph. It might be 25mph. It might be 30 mph. If it is too slow for you, you can either get a higher voltage battery, and a higher voltage controller, which is going to get expensive. OR, what I would recommend because it is FAR, FAR cheaper, is to get the high-speed motor in the first place. Note that the high-speed motor will require a LOT more amps for acceleration and hill climbing, this is where the controller may limit you, more amps means more Fets and more Fets means more cash, also may need cooling if climbing for more than a few minutes, the low-speed motor will use less amps for acceleration or hill climbing, but will need more volts for more speed.

is this by any chance a brushed motor with a short chain drive to the rear, like the old Curie ebikes? Not a hub motor? If so, those are completely different. Fairly reliable, but they do NOT like higher than designed voltages, unlike a DD Hub.
 
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