Tools Lets talk bike stands

snipechief

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I'm going to need a bike stand for my folding bikes (3), but more importantly my engwe gp2 folder which has a large rectangular top tube that houses the battery. I haven't seen a stand that has jaws that would fit around that tube. It's a heavy beast and not sure if there is a bike stand that would support 80lbs from a seat post clamp. I never shopped for a stand before, if you have a preference or experience with one that does work, I'd Ike to see it.
T
 
I'm assuming you mean a bike stand for repairs/maintenance.
If so then the standard wisdom is to always clamp your bike via the seat post NOT any part of the frame.
The reasons being that Seat tubes are generally pretty heavy-duty and intended to handle a lot of stress in various directions AND if you somehow get ham-handed and overclamp or tweak your seat-post it's an easy and (relatively) inexpensive fix. If you do the same thing to any part of your frame it's screwed.

Also, I would strongly caution you to never work on your bike with the battery mounted. If something were to trigger at the wrong time you could cause a lot of damage to the bike, or snip a finger right off (your bones are nothing to an 80nm motor).
 
I'm assuming you mean a bike stand for repairs/maintenance.
If so then the standard wisdom is to always clamp your bike via the seat post NOT any part of the frame.
The reasons being that Seat tubes are generally pretty heavy-duty and intended to handle a lot of stress in various directions AND if you somehow get ham-handed and overclamp or tweak your seat-post it's an easy and (relatively) inexpensive fix. If you do the same thing to any part of your frame it's screwed.

Also, I would strongly caution you to never work on your bike with the battery mounted. If something were to trigger at the wrong time you could cause a lot of damage to the bike, or snip a finger right off (your bones are nothing to an 80nm motor).

Ok , thanks for the information. Learn something everyday.
 
I'm going to need a bike stand for my folding bikes (3), but more importantly my engwe gp2 folder which has a large rectangular top tube that houses the battery. I haven't seen a stand that has jaws that would fit around that tube. It's a heavy beast and not sure if there is a bike stand that would support 80lbs from a seat post clamp. I never shopped for a stand before, if you have a preference or experience with one that does work, I'd Ike to see it.
T
First of all, remove the battery. That's primarily for safety reasons, but it will also reduce your overall bike weight by anywhere from 8 to 12 pounds.

Second, stands are rated assuming the load is evenly distributed, i.e., centered on the stand. Since most seat posts aren't centrally located, you need to adjust for this factor.

Third, there are dozens (hundreds?) of DIY options that are much cheaper than commercially produced models. Do a search on Google or YouTube for "DIY bike stand" and you can pore over the choices.

Fourth, unless you buy from a reputable brand (such as Park), I'd reserve a certain amount of skepticism for whatever the manufacturer claims as a maximum load.

* * * * *

Personally, I'm considering buying the Bikehand 110-pound model. It gets decent customer reviews. There are cheaper alternatives, but all of them have issues that I'm not willing to deal with.

If you can afford the $40 more, I'd recommend this one:

(Structurally, the Park stand is more than strong enough to handle your GP2. However, its base won't be wide enough to be stable when you load it. You may need to sandbag or otherwise secure the legs in order to prevent tipping.)

EDIT: If my biking future was longer, I'd invest in a Park stand. However, at my age (68), I'm looking at the twilight years of my bike riding experience. I just need something to get me through the next ten years or so. :coffee:
 
First of all, remove the battery. That's primarily for safety reasons, but it will also reduce your overall bike weight by anywhere from 8 to 12 pounds.

Second, stands are rated assuming the load is evenly distributed, i.e., centered on the stand. Since most seat posts aren't centrally located, you need to adjust for this factor.

Third, there are dozens (hundreds?) of DIY options that are much cheaper than commercially produced models. Do a search on Google or YouTube for "DIY bike stand" and you can pore over the choices.

Fourth, unless you buy from a reputable brand (such as Park), I'd reserve a certain amount of skepticism for whatever the manufacturer claims as a maximum load.

* * * * *

Personally, I'm considering buying the Bikehand 110-pound model. It gets decent customer reviews. There are cheaper alternatives, but all of them have issues that I'm not willing to deal with.

If you can afford the $40 more, I'd recommend this one:

(Structurally, the Park stand is more than strong enough to handle your GP2. However, it's base won't be wide enough to be stable when you load it. You may need to sandbag or otherwise secure the legs in order to prevent tipping.)

EDIT: If my biking future was longer, I'd invest in a Park stand. However, at my age (68), I'm looking at the twilight years of my bike riding experience. I just need something to get me through the next ten years or so. :coffee:
Two good choices. I appreciate your advice. 65 here, so right behind you ;-)>
 
I was too cheap to buy a repair stand. This was my $20 solution:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-8-in-Black-Industrial-Pipe-Shelf-Bracket-19682/302089331

I screwed them into the edge of the workbench in my shed and wrapped them with thick rags. You could also screw them into studs. I just hang the bike from them when I need to get the rear wheel off the floor. It's not as nice as a $400 Park Tool stand but it works.

They easily unscrew from the brackets when not in use. Easy peasy.
 
I’ve probably had my Park stand for 30 years or more, and it’s served me well.

52390615324_e8fe0bae32.jpg


Even with the battery out, lifting the Aventure up and having a free hand to clamp it is a bit of a struggle, but doable singlehanded. Piece of cake with a helper.
 
They feel great. The Kenda‘s on the used bike were about shot, and I don’t expect to spend much time off-road. $109 each seemed steep compared to “normal” bike tires, but at 4” these are almost motorcycle-sized, and in that light I guess it’s not outrageous.
 
They feel great. The Kenda‘s on the used bike were about shot, and I don’t expect to spend much time off-road. $109 each seemed steep compared to “normal” bike tires, but at 4” these are almost motorcycle-sized, and in that light I guess it’s not outrageous.
I've been looking at some tires here for spring and summer riding, just not sure what to get yet LOL

 
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I got this idea for building a bike stand where the bike would be supported by the seat post. In other words, I would buy a seat tube and bolt is to some kind of support. Then, I would slide the seat post into the tube and clamp it using the existing clamp.

Has anyone tried this? Any thoughts?

Thanks!
 
I got this idea for building a bike stand where the bike would be supported by the seat post. In other words, I would buy a seat tube and bolt is to some kind of support. Then, I would slide the seat post into the tube and clamp it using the existing clamp.

Has anyone tried this? Any thoughts?

Thanks!
Seems like it'd work
 
I used a engine/motor hoist called a cherry picker and a short nylon strap around my Wart Hog 750MD, 90+lbs, top bar.
As I was unable to find a bike stand that would fit the WH, with it's 3.5" x 1.800+" top cross bar.
HTH's
 
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