How many Roll-Road Emma 3 owners?

danpenn

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Let's see a show of hands on who owns one of the new Roll-Road Emma 3's. And the Emma 2's. Maybe we can get a Roll-Road listing in the Electric Bike Brands section of this forum.
Here's mine.
IMG_2353.jpeg
 
Personally, I've never seen this brand before. So I'm not sure how many others on the forum. You will find that on the bike. It appears to be very generic as there seem to be almost too many brand names of very similar bikes in the market today. I suspect over the coming months we'll see a thinning of this market for one reason or another.
 
I researched for weeks before I made my decision to purchase the EMMA 3.0 ebike. Many bikes had good features but this one put them all together into one great ride!
• 2 - 52V 20AH batteries
• Large soft padded seat
• 4 piston hydraulic brakes
• Great digital display
• CST Scout tires for on/off road
• Torque sensor in crank
• 1500W BAFANG SUTTO motor
• Front and rear suspension
• Front and rear lights with turn signals
• NFC unlock
• Lots of accessories!
I couldn’t find anything else with all these features at any price and the price I paid is very reasonable!
20240618_110154.jpg
 
Be careful, these do not meet legal US eBike limits:
  • Motor is capable of at least 1500 W (eBikes are limited to 750 W max)
  • Top motor speed is 35+ mph. (eBikes are limited to 28 mph assist)
In some places, it will be a problem. If your local enforcement is lax and you're not riding like a jerk, it'll be OK, but in hot button areas like college campuses beachfront boardwalks, etc.

If it has a VIN, you can register it as a moped, but even there, there are speed limits. (30 mph is a common one)
Without a VIN, it is in a no-man's land: can't be registered as a moped because no VIN, and exceeds eBike limits, which means it can only legally be used offroad on private property.
 
It does appear to be thoughtfully spec'd though!
  • Torque sensor (who cares, on an eMoped that won't realistically be pedaled much?)
  • Remote reservoirs for rear shocks. Maybe the rear shocks are actually effective? (unlike on my old Juiced HyperScrambler 2)
  • Looks like decent pedals (but not for barefoot!)
  • CST Scout tires are a reasonable choice. Big wide lug surfaces will be good on road and will be OK on gravel when deflated a bit. MUCH better than the silly, noisy, aggressive knobbies. (let's not pretend these are proper dirtbikes, eh?)
  • Decent coverage fenders
Only complaint: large chainring means no 5 mph super-low gear, with which to limp home when/if batteries run dry. There's no point in pedaling along at > 20 mph; the user is not contributing significant energy at these speeds.
 
Let's see a show of hands on who owns one of the new Roll-Road Emma 3's. And the Emma 2's. Maybe we can get a Roll-Road listing in the Electric Bike Brands section of this forum.
Here's mine.
View attachment 14726
I’m awaiting shipment of my new Emma 3.0 later this week. Looking forward to all the features this bike has to offer.
 
I got mine, the long seat one. Any idea how to tighten the first 2 screws in the front. It took me hours to put this bike together. Looks great, the headlight on, the turn signals on, the trunk. But I got a fight with the nuts on the seat. I decide to leave it there, 4 screws seems fine to me. I took a test ride, so smooth the ride so comfortable the suspension, love it for now
 
Any idea how to tighten the first 2 screws in the front.
I had the same problem when I changed to the accessory thinner/flatter seat. Pull the under the seat battery out. Now install a couple of the middle and rear nuts on loosely so the seat can be wiggled around a little until you can get a straight shot at the front bolts with the nut in a socket wrench on an extension. After one or both front nuts are tightened, you can install the middle and rear nuts.
And Bob's your uncle!
 
I had the same problem when I changed to the accessory thinner/flatter seat. Pull the under the seat battery out. Now install a couple of the middle and rear nuts on loosely so the seat can be wiggled around a little until you can get a straight shot at the front bolts with the nut in a socket wrench on an extension. After one or both front nuts are tightened, you can install the middle and rear nuts.
And Bob's your uncle!
There is no room for my fingers in. I will try that. But I love the bike
 
I'd like to rise the handlebar 1-2inches, is there a riser fit for it? Making it more upright
 
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