Himiway Range Test

kerock17

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Hi all, I have had my all-terrain cruiser since mid March. Because of the unpredictable weather here in the Northwest and basic laziness on my part I've only put 100 miles on the bike. I've been curious about how much range is 17 1/2 amp hour battery will provide.

So after the last charge of the battery I reset the trip meter and just rode the bike until yesterday when I had gone 28.4 miles and I was down to one bar. The last bar was not flashing which I understand is when you should charge but living in the hills the remaining battery just did not have enough power to really get me up the hills properly.

The 28.4 miles was a mixture of pedal assist and throttle, pretty heavy on the throttle as I get a little lazy and use the throttle. My riding mostly consist of hill climbing and flat ground cruising. The actual climb to get to my home starts at about 50 feet above sea level and ends at over 350 feet. This climb is all within about 8/10 of a mile.
I took my new Cruiser on a 30 mile test ride to see how it would do. The bike had about 25 previous miles on it. The trail was the Jorden river trail in SLC, mostly flat but some up and down - overpasses, bridges and stuff - mostly paved. It was fairly crowded so there was lots of slow down and speed up situations. Some headwind for the first 15 miles. I am a big guy at about 280 lbs. and 6'1" (64 years old). We rode pretty fast when we could - 20 mph or so, probably averaged 13-15 mph. Did mostly pedal assist.

After the first 15 miles the battery still had 4 bars (out of 5), but it dropped faster after that. By mile 27 I was down to one bar (last bar) and it was still at one bar when we finished (31 miles). After I stopped it waffled between one and two bars. It was not the 40-60 miles advertised, but I was satisfied with the results being big and all. Wishing for a second battery...but oh the cost.....
 

Hoggdoc

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I took my new Cruiser on a 30 mile test ride to see how it would do. The bike had about 25 previous miles on it. The trail was the Jorden river trail in SLC, mostly flat but some up and down - overpasses, bridges and stuff - mostly paved. It was fairly crowded so there was lots of slow down and speed up situations. Some headwind for the first 15 miles. I am a big guy at about 280 lbs. and 6'1" (64 years old). We rode pretty fast when we could - 20 mph or so, probably averaged 13-15 mph. Did mostly pedal assist.

After the first 15 miles the battery still had 4 bars (out of 5), but it dropped faster after that. By mile 27 I was down to one bar (last bar) and it was still at one bar when we finished (31 miles). After I stopped it waffled between one and two bars. It was not the 40-60 miles advertised, but I was satisfied with the results being big and all. Wishing for a second battery...but oh the cost.....
You didn't say how much throttle you were using or if you were peddling what pedal assist level you were using. Typically the easy bike manufacturers state their mileage using the lowest level of assist while pedaling in their max mileage listings. I have the same bike you do and typically get about 30 miles on a charge and I mix between pedal and full throttle and I also have to climb some serious hills getting home after each ride.
 

pnwbiker

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You can call BS if you want (no offense), it's not improbable at all if you know what you are doing. On PAS 1, I can easily attain 70 miles on mostly flat terrain. I have modified the computer settings from the default, much more conservative than as delivered. After having the bike for a year, I don't ride it at PAS 1 unless I am trying to make it last. I got 64 miles at PAS 1 before charging last week as I'm trying to get my legs ready for a long ride this weekend. I'll ride 40+ miles this weekend, starting with a full battery and end with over 75% of the battery remaining (as I did last year).
 

pnwbiker

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This place used to be a fun place to hang out, share experiences and help others. Recently, not so much.

I do have "receipts", not that anyone here would take them at face value. I never said making the battery last that long would be fun for most people as it takes a lot of leg work, nor do I recommend running the battery down that far on a regular basis. Have fun.
 

ozzie21

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If your vehicle has a 2" hitch receiver, you might consider one of these: https://www.harborfreight.com/400-lb-receiver-mount-aluminum-motorcycle-carrier-62837.html - there are many video reviews on YouTube if you want to check it out in detail.

I just finished assembling, modding and figuring out the rigging on mine, which was only $138 delivered (search on coupons; there is always a 20% discount out there). Since the wheelbase on my Rad Mini is only 55", I had to drill out the rivets on one of the horizontal support bars and shove it over to allow the rear tire to drop a bit more into the framework. Not all the way (there's another bar in the way that can't be moved), but enough, and the front wheel is fully dropped and clamped into place. Once I figured out how to properly rig it with four ratcheting tiedowns, and locked out the front suspension so it can't bounce, it's solid as a rock. Your Himiway might not need any mods if the wheelbase is 60" or thereabouts; my guess is that it's somewhere around there.

This carrier is designed for motorcycles over 300 lbs, so an e-bike is nothing to it, yet since it's aluminum it weighs only about 45 lbs without the detachable ramp, so it's easy to attach and detach (there's even a spot at the rear to clamp down and carry the ramp). Comes with an antisway bracket too; when that's bolted down (two 3/4" wrenches takes care of that), nothing moves. It's really easy to load my MiniST as well, thanks to its throttle I just let the motor carefully drive it up the ramp into place, as well as for unloading (the ramp moves to the other side to drive it off forward-facing); no heavy lifting necessary.

I like it a lot; here's a couple pics taken during rigging adjustment, before I snipped off the excess strapping. The antisway clamp wasn't tightened down, so it looks a bit crooked - squares up nicely when it's tight. It's not centered left/right on the vehicle, and that would take significant modification to change, but most of the weight of the bike is toward the rear, so she's pretty well balanced and I'm happy.

I'm planning to add reflective tape to the rear-facing edges of the rack and the ramp, and have a set of temporary-towing stop/turn lights when necessary, to bungee to the rack (they're magnetic, but the rack frame is aluminum). Also ordered a bike cover to help keep out dust and rain on longer trips; will need to see if it fits and can be kept from flapping in the wind.
Have a look at what I just posted showing how I adapted the Harbor Freight 500 lb motorcycle rack.
 

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ozzie21

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Like I said I get lazy, and don't pedal as much as should most likely. I'm 75 yrs old here and weigh around 200 lbs +or- depending. Combining those two most likely have a lot to do with our range differences. I definitely need to work more on the pedaling aspect of riding, which was the whole reason for buying the bike, but like I said I get lazy.

Thanks for the input I too really think I bought the right e-bike for my uses, but like most people I'm looking to see what I be missing for some other designs.
I don't see how anyone can get 70 miles range on a Himiway Cruiser with the stock 48V x 17.5Ah battery. Himiway promo BS says 60 miles. Typical puffery. That would be on a calm day with no wind at all on all flat hard asphalt. I checked mine today. I went 73.4 kms (45.6 miles) on real life varying terrain (probably equally 1/3 inclines, 1/3 declines and 1/3 flats), and I had 11% battery left. As you can see I've changed my stock Himiway display to the KD718 display. I can likely get a bit more than 50 miles before completely powering out on my battery.
 

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ozzie21

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Yea puffery. I first heard the word a long time ago when someone on TV was describing exaggerated claims of performance, quality and reliability made by auto manufacturers which seems unbelievable, lies but legally permitted for some reason.
Dictionary definition of puffery:
exaggerated commendation especially for promotional purposes : hype.

Having said that, I do have another eBike. I work overseas and I have a Trinx 24 speed (8x3) mountain bike which has a 500W rear hub Bafang motor, and a 48V x 13Ah battery that I can get a real 80-90 kms (50-56 miles) per charge. I bought a backup 48V x 20Ah battery and I can get 130-140 kms (81-87 miles) from that battery. I was quite pleased that I got such good range from both of these batteries. I don't know if it is the gearing of the bike and/or motor or what. The bike is also quite a but lighter weight than my Himiway Cruiser. Trinx is a popular brand in Asia and the Far East for bicycles and eBikes. This bike wasn't a DIY. It came from the Trinx factory as I bought it.
 

ozzie21

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Gotcha... I've got a 52V x 17.5Ah and a 52V x 20Ah that will give me 1950Wh. I could have gotten bigger output batteries but I'm in Canada and the seller had these in stock in their Canada warehouse. To get larger output they would have to be shipped from China and would have cost a lot more and took longer to get. Right now I'm waiting on delivery of a battery blender and adapter cables for the setup. Gotta get rid of that range anxiety...lol
 

Rabbit170

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I have a Himiway fat tire cruiser and my wife has a step thru fat tire cruiser and we have ridden almost 300 miles in all types of terrain mostly in the mountains of PA. Most charge we ever lost was 2 bars on 40 miles of big time elevation change. When we ride on the local rails to trails don’t even drop a bar on twenty miles and thats a combination of pedal assist and just throttle.
 

ozzie21

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I have a Himiway fat tire cruiser and my wife has a step thru fat tire cruiser and we have ridden almost 300 miles in all types of terrain mostly in the mountains of PA. Most charge we ever lost was 2 bars on 40 miles of big time elevation change. When we ride on the local rails to trails don’t even drop a bar on twenty miles and thats a combination of pedal assist and just throttle.
I think you'll find that if you check what mileage you can get, that generally you'll see if you start with 5 bars that you can probably go at least 40%-50% of whatever your actual maximum battery mileage might be (which you think should be around 2-1/2 bars, but it won't be) before you drop even 1 bar. So using 100 miles as a round number for example purposes, you will likely get 40-50 miles before you drop 1 bar, leaving 4 bars showing. But after that your bars will drop exponentially faster and at less miles. Maybe to drop another 1 bar it will take only 20 miles, leaving 3 bars showing. Then to drop 1 more bar it might take only 10 miles or less leaving 2 bars showing, etc., etc, If you get to just 1 bar left you better be close to home or your truck with the bike rack cuz pedaling 100% manually is a lot harder than with a regular bicycle cuz you're always manually driving the motor also even though you've got no battery power.
 
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