Himiway Range Test

Hoggdoc

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Hi all, I have had my all-terrain cruiser since mid March. Because of the unpredictable weather here in the Northwest and basic laziness on my part I've only put 100 miles on the bike. I've been curious about how much range is 17 1/2 amp hour battery will provide.

So after the last charge of the battery I reset the trip meter and just rode the bike until yesterday when I had gone 28.4 miles and I was down to one bar. The last bar was not flashing which I understand is when you should charge but living in the hills the remaining battery just did not have enough power to really get me up the hills properly.

The 28.4 miles was a mixture of pedal assist and throttle, pretty heavy on the throttle as I get a little lazy and use the throttle. My riding mostly consist of hill climbing and flat ground cruising. The actual climb to get to my home starts at about 50 feet above sea level and ends at over 350 feet. This climb is all within about 8/10 of a mile.
 
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LTK Honolulu

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You know the answer to your hill problem, just need verification. You are not stupid except for "writings."

Here's verification. You bought an underpowered bike with underpowered spare battery. Suggestion, trade in your setup for a high powered vertical accelerating bike costing $5,000-$12,000, bare bones. Most of the cost should go to power, not brand name, special frame, accouterments, technology or innovations. It should not be a showcase or special bike. Try to get a 2-yr old in the corner with pedals you like or take pedals off your bike at trade. Shop around or go back to the original dealer.
 

pnwbiker

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I have the same Himiway Cruiser, I rec'd mine about the same time as yours (March 15 here). I have modified the computer settings and pedal assist levels. I have around 350 miles on mine and I average about 70 miles per charge using pedal assist and some battery only. My normal ride is pretty flat with a couple of fairly steep hills (about 304 feet of elevation climbing). I do pedal a lot on these rides.

I have another ride that is about 5 miles with about 1.5 miles of switchback and 852 feet of elevation at about 40% grade (Himiway says don't climb hills over 15% grade, YMMV - and to be fair - I never see another bike on this trail). The ride up the hill is all battery. The ride down can be exciting - a 72# bike can gain a quick head of steam! The brakes are great. I get about 28-30 miles on a charge when riding this route.

All in all, I love the Himiway. BTW, I learned I can pedal the darn thing when the battery dies - in first gear and only on flat ground or downhill LOL. I hear you about the weather here in the great PNW :)
 

Hoggdoc

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I have the same Himiway Cruiser, I rec'd mine about the same time as yours (March 15 here). I have modified the computer settings and pedal assist levels. I have around 350 miles on mine and I average about 70 miles per charge using pedal assist and some battery only. My normal ride is pretty flat with a couple of fairly steep hills (about 304 feet of elevation climbing). I do pedal a lot on these rides.

I have another ride that is about 5 miles with about 1.5 miles of switchback and 852 feet of elevation at about 40% grade (Himiway says don't climb hills over 15% grade, YMMV - and to be fair - I never see another bike on this trail). The ride up the hill is all battery. The ride down can be exciting - a 72# bike can gain a quick head of steam! The brakes are great. I get about 28-30 miles on a charge when riding this route.

All in all, I love the Himiway. BTW, I learned I can pedal the darn thing when the battery dies - in first gear and only on flat ground or downhill LOL. I hear you about the weather here in the great PNW :)
Like I said I get lazy, and don't pedal as much as should most likely. I'm 75 yrs old here and weigh around 200 lbs +or- depending. Combining those two most likely have a lot to do with our range differences. I definitely need to work more on the pedaling aspect of riding, which was the whole reason for buying the bike, but like I said I get lazy.

Thanks for the input I too really think I bought the right e-bike for my uses, but like most people I'm looking to see what I be missing for some other designs.
 

Hoggdoc

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You know the answer to your hill problem, just need verification. You are not stupid except for "writings."

Here's verification. You bought an underpowered bike with underpowered spare battery. Suggestion, trade in your setup for a high powered vertical accelerating bike costing $5,000-$12,000, bare bones. Most of the cost should go to power, not brand name, special frame, accouterments, technology or innovations. It should not be a showcase or special bike. Try to get a 2-yr old in the corner with pedals you like or take pedals off your bike at trade. Shop around or go back to the original dealer.
Hmm, wondering how you feel a bike with 750 watt continuous, peak 1200 watts (48v x 25 amps) is a underpowered bike. The battery is 48v 17.5 aH pack using premium Samsung cells, also not underpowered.

BTW Himiway bike are sold only MFG direct, they have no dealers.
 

pnwbiker

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I think lazy is fine, and ebikes allow us to be lazy or get in a bit of a workout depending on our whim of the minute. I'll be turning the big six oh this year and weigh about 200#. I hope I'm still riding when I get there :) Kudos to you!

I've been watching e-bike reviews by a gentleman that goes by CitizenCycle on youtube. He range tests them all using battery only if you are looking for more info.

The only bike I might be interested in the future specifically for range is the Juiced RipCurrent S. Supposed to get ~72 miles. I like the design and the company is known for their battery power and range.
 

Hoggdoc

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I think lazy is fine, and ebikes allow us to be lazy or get in a bit of a workout depending on our whim of the minute. I'll be turning the big six oh this year and weigh about 200#. I hope I'm still riding when I get there :) Kudos to you!

I've been watching e-bike reviews by a gentleman that goes by CitizenCycle on youtube. He range tests them all using battery only if you are looking for more info.

The only bike I might be interested in the future specifically for range is the Juiced RipCurrent S. Supposed to get ~72 miles. I like the design and the company is known for their battery power and range.
Yes indeed I watch Bryan's video as well (CitizenCycle). He does a good job actually showing what each of the bikes he reviews actually perform in the real world.

Actually I am very pleased with the overall build quality of the Himiway especially when you consider the price point they sell for. I just keep wondering how a mid-drive would perform in my hills, guess it's a "grass is greener on the other side of the fence" thing.

Where are you in Oregon?
 
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pnwbiker

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Beaverton, just SW of Portlandia.

I've thought about a mid-drive as well, was considering the Biketrix mid-drive, among others. Bryan said they felt more powerful on the hills. I suspect that there is going to be a ton of innovation in the next few years in the ebike category.
 

srzylstra

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Hmm, wondering how you feel a bike with 750 watt continuous, peak 1200 watts (48v x 25 amps) is a underpowered bike. The battery is 48v 17.5 aH pack using premium Samsung cells, also not underpowered.

BTW Himiway bike are sold only MFG direct, they have no dealers.
Nothing wrong with your bike. Mine have close to the same power and battery. Plenty of zip. More power (at least for my 74 years is crazy) I just lay off the throttle
unless dragging a bit.. Vancouver WA is fairly flat around me…….
 

BMoreySurfs

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I have the same Himiway Cruiser, I rec'd mine about the same time as yours (March 15 here). I have modified the computer settings and pedal assist levels. I have around 350 miles on mine and I average about 70 miles per charge using pedal assist and some battery only. My normal ride is pretty flat with a couple of fairly steep hills (about 304 feet of elevation climbing). I do pedal a lot on these rides.

I have another ride that is about 5 miles with about 1.5 miles of switchback and 852 feet of elevation at about 40% grade (Himiway says don't climb hills over 15% grade, YMMV - and to be fair - I never see another bike on this trail). The ride up the hill is all battery. The ride down can be exciting - a 72# bike can gain a quick head of steam! The brakes are great. I get about 28-30 miles on a charge when riding this route.

All in all, I love the Himiway. BTW, I learned I can pedal the darn thing when the battery dies - in first gear and only on flat ground or downhill LOL. I hear you about the weather here in the great PNW :)
Awesome! Got my Himiway Cruiser the first week of March and now have over 760 miles on it. Even taken it on a cross country excursion riding the beaches of Delaware to downtown Nashville, Washington D.C., St. Louis, all over Virginia, New Mexico and a handful of other states. Was on a business trip covering 21 states in 4 weeks, 8800 miles and logged over 160 miles on the eBike. In San Diego we have some hills on the coast but like you I’ve modified the heck out of the bike, accessories, power and speed settings etc. It’s amazing! Enjoy your bike and hope you make it out of the valley to cruise Santa Cruz or something.
 

Hoggdoc

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Nothing wrong with your bike. Mine have close to the same power and battery. Plenty of zip. More power (at least for my 74 years is crazy) I just lay off the throttle
unless dragging a bit.. Vancouver WA is fairly flat around me…….
I'm up in the hills of Longview above the Country Club. Lots of hills on return to home from rides. Wish I had a way to haul bike down your way, but don't thing is just to heavy and big for easy transport unless to have a van or pickup.
 

JimInPT

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I'm up in the hills of Longview above the Country Club. Lots of hills on return to home from rides. Wish I had a way to haul bike down your way, but don't thing is just to heavy and big for easy transport unless to have a van or pickup.
If your vehicle has a 2" hitch receiver, you might consider one of these: https://www.harborfreight.com/400-lb-receiver-mount-aluminum-motorcycle-carrier-62837.html - there are many video reviews on YouTube if you want to check it out in detail.

I just finished assembling, modding and figuring out the rigging on mine, which was only $138 delivered (search on coupons; there is always a 20% discount out there). Since the wheelbase on my Rad Mini is only 55", I had to drill out the rivets on one of the horizontal support bars and shove it over to allow the rear tire to drop a bit more into the framework. Not all the way (there's another bar in the way that can't be moved), but enough, and the front wheel is fully dropped and clamped into place. Once I figured out how to properly rig it with four ratcheting tiedowns, and locked out the front suspension so it can't bounce, it's solid as a rock. Your Himiway might not need any mods if the wheelbase is 60" or thereabouts; my guess is that it's somewhere around there.

This carrier is designed for motorcycles over 300 lbs, so an e-bike is nothing to it, yet since it's aluminum it weighs only about 45 lbs without the detachable ramp, so it's easy to attach and detach (there's even a spot at the rear to clamp down and carry the ramp). Comes with an antisway bracket too; when that's bolted down (two 3/4" wrenches takes care of that), nothing moves. It's really easy to load my MiniST as well, thanks to its throttle I just let the motor carefully drive it up the ramp into place, as well as for unloading (the ramp moves to the other side to drive it off forward-facing); no heavy lifting necessary.

I like it a lot; here's a couple pics taken during rigging adjustment, before I snipped off the excess strapping. The antisway clamp wasn't tightened down, so it looks a bit crooked - squares up nicely when it's tight. It's not centered left/right on the vehicle, and that would take significant modification to change, but most of the weight of the bike is toward the rear, so she's pretty well balanced and I'm happy.

I'm planning to add reflective tape to the rear-facing edges of the rack and the ramp, and have a set of temporary-towing stop/turn lights when necessary, to bungee to the rack (they're magnetic, but the rack frame is aluminum). Also ordered a bike cover to help keep out dust and rain on longer trips; will need to see if it fits and can be kept from flapping in the wind.
 

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Hoggdoc

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If your vehicle has a 2" hitch receiver, you might consider one of these: https://www.harborfreight.com/400-lb-receiver-mount-aluminum-motorcycle-carrier-62837.html - there are many video reviews on YouTube if you want to check it out in detail.

I just finished assembling, modding and figuring out the rigging on mine, which was only $138 delivered (search on coupons; there is always a 20% discount out there). Since the wheelbase on my Rad Mini is only 55", I had to drill out the rivets on one of the horizontal support bars and shove it over to allow the rear tire to drop a bit more into the framework. Not all the way (there's another bar in the way that can't be moved), but enough, and the front wheel is fully dropped and clamped into place. Once I figured out how to properly rig it with four ratcheting tiedowns, and locked out the front suspension so it can't bounce, it's solid as a rock. Your Himiway might not need any mods if the wheelbase is 60" or thereabouts; my guess is that it's somewhere around there.

This carrier is designed for motorcycles over 300 lbs, so an e-bike is nothing to it, yet since it's aluminum it weighs only about 45 lbs without the detachable ramp, so it's easy to attach and detach (there's even a spot at the rear to clamp down and carry the ramp). Comes with an antisway bracket too; when that's bolted down (two 3/4" wrenches takes care of that), nothing moves. It's really easy to load my MiniST as well, thanks to its throttle I just let the motor carefully drive it up the ramp into place, as well as for unloading (the ramp moves to the other side to drive it off forward-facing); no heavy lifting necessary.

I like it a lot; here's a couple pics taken during rigging adjustment, before I snipped off the excess strapping. The antisway clamp wasn't tightened down, so it looks a bit crooked - squares up nicely when it's tight. It's not centered left/right on the vehicle, and that would take significant modification to change, but most of the weight of the bike is toward the rear, so she's pretty well balanced and I'm happy.

I'm planning to add reflective tape to the rear-facing edges of the rack and the ramp, and have a set of temporary-towing stop/turn lights when necessary, to bungee to the rack (they're magnetic, but the rack frame is aluminum). Also ordered a bike cover to help keep out dust and rain on longer trips; will need to see if it fits and can be kept from flapping in the wind.
This is something I will look into. I have to research the cost of putting a hitch on my Mustang. Thanks for sharing I had not seen HF offering.
 

srzylstra

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A some aftermarket hitch people are hesitant to install hitches any more. I was told due to liability.. so I bought a truck and a 1up USA rack. A $20,000 bike carrier.. LOL
 

Hoggdoc

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A some aftermarket hitch people are hesitant to install hitches any more. I was told due to liability.. so I bought a truck and a 1up USA rack. A $20,000 bike carrier.. LOL
Wow seriously, what has happened to our world? LOL $20000 bike carrier I feel your pain. I don't have the financial ability to do the same.
 

srzylstra

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Wow seriously, what has happened to our world? LOL $20000 bike carrier I feel your pain. I don't have the financial ability to do the same.
I get it. However I haul 2 ebikes to California once in a while. So a car was out of the question. Truly a financial strain, even with an older truck. Much less of a strain on my aged body though!
 
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Hoggdoc

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This is something I will look into. I have to research the cost of putting a hitch on my Mustang. Thanks for sharing I had not seen HF offering.
I checked the HF rack sure looks like a great value when compared to others in the market. The issue for me is my 1999 Mustang GT, the only hitches I find for it are class one receivers that the HF rack won't fit in.

If I knew someone with welding skills I suppose the class one hitch could be modded with a 2" reciever. I'm not worried about that mod as the overall weight on the hitch would be far below the 200 lb tongue weight limit of the class 1 hitch.
 

srzylstra

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I checked the HF rack sure looks like a great value when compared to others in the market. The issue for me is my 1999 Mustang GT, the only hitches I find for it are class one receivers that the HF rack won't fit in.

If I knew someone with welding skills I suppose the class one hitch could be modded with a 2" reciever. I'm not worried about that mod as the overall weight on the hitch would be far below the 200 lb tongue weight limit of the class 1 hitch.
I looked into modifying a hitch and was rejected by several shops due to liability. I’m sure it’s easy enough. I had a metal fabrication shop in So Cal. We stayed away from hitches. Probably a small welding shop locally.
 
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