Haibike Sduro HardSeven 6.0 E-Mountain Bike Feedback

RedRider

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I just came across that bike while looking online. It is my size, the only 1 left going at 50% discount from a good shop in my area. I guess it might be a 2018 but more likely a 2017.
If i buy it will i have a like new battery or time not charged will have done damage?
I would likely switch the cassette from that 11-36 to a Sunrace 11-42.
Are you aware of any flaw with that model?
The specs are in the link
The $ are canadians
Thanks

Haibike Sduro HardSeven 6.0 E-Mountain Bike.jpg
 
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JackWare

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A quick bit of Googlefu shows it's a 2017 model but regardless won't it be sold with warranty?

For the money it's a decent spec and it may be easier to swap to a 11-40 cassette to avoid changing or messing with the rear derailleur, though you'll probably need to lengthen the chain, (if you find you really need to change the gearing).
 

RedRider

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Ya, i looked a bit, it is a 2017, i found that company is german. Here except for their Ebike i think they had no distributor until very recently. I will go discuss with the shop. On my fat(SRAM) it was a simple switch from my 10 speeds 11-36 to a 11-42 but i will check for that 1. I like climbing and with the 20 xtra pounds i know i will go for an easier gear from the cassette or a smaller front ring.(It is a 20 speeds)
 

JackWare

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If you buy it, try riding before changing anything as you be amazed at the bike's torque and climbing ability. (I'm assuming you haven't ridden an ebike before).

The reason I say 11-40 is that the M786 has a max capacity of 43t;

https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/produ...-M786-SGS.html

So the difference on the front chainring is 44-32 = 12, leaving a potential difference of 31t for the rear cassette. An 11-42 is on that limit whereas a 11-40 gives the system a bit of leeway for adjustment.

In Europe Haibike have a very good reputation and are a quality product.
 

honkinunit

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Edit: I just looked at that page again, and that bike is size 40cm. I am 5'9" and mine is a 45cm and feels about right, I could go slightly smaller, but 40cm would be a no go for me. Maybe that small of a frame works for you, but it is never a good idea to buy a bike because it is a good deal, it it doesn't fit you properly.

I have a 2017 Haibike Xduro HardSeven 6.0, and also a 2016 Haibike Xduro HardNine 5.0.

The good:

1) Haibikes frames are really awesome. They aren't just some crappy aluminum tubes TIG welded together, they are very deeply engineered hydroformed tubes, and the geometry, the battery cradle, the motor attachment, the dropouts, ect. are all 100% top notch. Very high quality.

2) Both of my Haibikes have Bosch motors, but I've ridden the Yamahas and they really are great. I can't comment on the gearing other than to say both of mine do not have low enough gears. My low gear is essentially the same as 45x42 because of the Bosch 2.5:1 gear multiplication on the crank side. Yours would have 32x36 low which would probably be OK, depending on where you ride and how strong you are. The drivetrain on that bike is top notch.

3) Haibike uses house brand saddles, seatpost, stems and handlebars, and they are perfectly OK. The seatpost is a good design, and the saddle is really, really comfortable. With that said, I put a Thudbuster seatpost on the 29'er to soak up some hits, and I am considering it even on the 27x3.0 HardSeven. The Haibike frame is *extremely* stiff, and it pounds your backside like no other hardtail I've ever ridden. If I could find a quality dropper post with thudbuster type suspension, I'd love it.

4) I believe my HardSeven has the exact same wheels and tires that one has. They are a little heavy, but bombproof. The hubs have very smooth, sealed cartridge bearings and are really nice. My wheels came with Tubeless-ready rimstrips installed already, the rims and tires are tubeless ready, and removing the tubes made a huge difference in the ride. 27.5x3.0 tubes weigh about a pound each! Going tubeless drops two pounds of weight where it really counts, and you can run 16-18 psi off road, which provides great traction. I converted to tubeless in a grand total of about 20 minutes! The best thing you can do. Do it immediately!

The bad:

1) No water bottle cages at all. This kind of sucks.

2) I have the same Magura 4.0 brakes on my HardSeven. I do not like them. Power is not lacking, but they feel "dead", chatter when they get warm, and rattle like mad. I believe the pads are actually rattling in their holders. I have some XT brakes in the box ready to put on when the pads on the Maguras are finished. The specs on your link say the bike has 180mm rotors on both ends, but mine has a 203mm on the front and that photo sure looks like a 203mm on the front of that one. Good move by Haibike.

3) My HardNine has the 29er version of that same SunTour fork. It is just OK. Small bump compliance is not great, pretty harsh travel, and quite frankly, the stanchions are pretty small for hard use off road, it would be especially true with the 3.0" tires. The lockout is handy though. My HardSeven came with a RockShox Yari, which I love to death. It is too bad they didn't put the Yari on the version you are looking at.

Bottom line: That bike is a great deal for $2350 Canadian. I've ridden both of my Haibike hardtails on tough trails all over Colorado and out in Moab, and I love them both. Just be aware that they are really stiff, and you are going to feel every bump in the rear, especially if you are used to riding full suspension. The cool thing about the Haibike hardtails is that they have rack and fender mounts, so they also make great commuters. My 29'er is my commuter of choice these days.

I say go for it. Even if you didn't like it for some reason, the resale on quality ebikes is pretty good. Look at it this way, how much would you have to pay for a quality 27.5x3.0 hardtail MTB that is not an eBike? Probably $1500-1800? A Yamaha battery is $600 US by itself, and the motor is $900 US. At the price you would pay, your downside is not that big.
 

RedRider

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Thanks a bunch, i will be at the shop in 1 hour and hopefully get at least a short test. I am used to hardtails and between my light weight and long legs just a cushy sadle is enough maybe that bike will need a bit extra but certainly not a big problem for me. I know the fork is not top but if all the rest is good i might get it. I do not cary water most of the time. Here the Evo from Specialized is pushed but that is marketing so if i see value i appreciate it. I also do not use any dropper.
 

RedRider

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It is 150 miles away, it will be shipped than put together by the shop that will call me. In the meanwhile i will check if some other retailer has that brand around Montreal. Now we are in the ski season with only on a few fatbikes on the floor.
If it is short it will be a good fit for my body.
 

RedRider

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The shop had it assembled, i went, after switching for a longer seatpost it seems my position will be fine once i switch for a raising stem. They would switch the 10 speeds 11-36 cassette to an 11-42 for about 40$ extra. From talking to Ebike owners of many months 1 option is buying a second battery so we might ride 90-120 min and switch for a longer ride. An other option is a battery 750Wh to 850 but the heavier weight is not optimal.
Physically i am OK so pedaling 4 hrs is normal for me.
The obvious factor is i want to avoid using full power so i think an easier small gear will allow me to climb anywhere without the need to drain the battery.
Is my view correct? The bike is about 50 pounds, i guess my range will be 2-4 hrs depending on if i use25-50% assist or 50-100%.
Again thanks for your input.
The bike is new but 2017 model so i get it 50% off.
In about 2 days the battery will be ready for a road test(we just had snow so the streets were not ideal to get a free trial).
 

MikeTowpathTraveler

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Haibike Full FatSix owner and rider here. That is a nice looking bike and I wish you the best. You're gonna love it. My riding is mostly on water level routes with minimal climbing on the hilly roadways over various creeksheds and basins. Based on my experience (coming up a little over 5800 miles on this bike), a fully charged battery will give you the estimated miles the Yamaha drive system predicts upon starting out. Yesterday I did a 20 mile run on asphalt roads here in south New Jersey and came back with a bit over 50% battery capacity remaining. The system on High power predicts a range of 43 miles on flat land and I have found their estimations to be spot on in all power ranges, high, standard, Eco+ and Eco.

I believe that bigger rear cog you had installed will deliver better mileage compared to the stock Haibike cassette gearing. You'll find after riding your Haibike long enough that the trick to gaining the most mileage out of your battery is avoiding hammering thepedals in higher gears, making the torque sensor deliver more energy to drive the motor. I have found that when you live with the power meter delivering 3 bars or higher, your mileage suffers. This mileage game is just a fun trick to do, seeing how much mileage you can squeeze from a full battery charge.

One of these months, I'd like to have a spare Yamaha battery for the Full FatSix. It then becomes a real potential 100 mile range bike using the Standard power setting. As it was, I was able to get 95 miles last summer out of my Yamaha 400wh battery on a canal towpath run, using a combo of all power settings.

Personally, I'd not use an aftermarket battery. Too many questions about long term safety, warranty factors, people standing behind the battery is there are issues, questions about the cells within the battery; are they top notch battery's? Kinda wish Yamaha themselves would make available with a bigger capacity battery, but I don't think that is in their focus at this time.

Mike
 

howardv

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Early this year, I bought the Haibike SDURO FullNine 6.5:

https://shopsandiegoflyrides.com/pro...nt=29526759683

Absolutely love it. For $2,999, you get Fox front suspension and Rockshox rear suspension, full Shimano XT drivetrain and the XT hydro brakes. Been a fantastic bike.

If you can wait a few more months, Haibike will probably be closing out their 2018 bikes with a 40-50% off deal. You'll get a much better selection. The 2017 deals have mostly been sold, so there are just a few left.

And don't change the cassette until you try it. You'll be amazed at the climbing power. About the battery, I go on 40-50 mile rides frequently with lots of climbing. I usually come back with 50% battery remaining. Of course, this will depend on how hard you want to work too! Personally, I enjoy the workout, so I use the motor in Eco mode on most climbs. Very rarely do I switch to standard or high settings (maybe for a short burst up a very steep and technical trail).

I've put 600 miles on my bike so far and I just replaced the brake pads yesterday. I checked the chain and it has probably another 300 miles left in it's life. It's a good idea to change the cassette too when changing the chain, so I'll be doing that soon. Drivetrains wear out very quickly on mid-drive e-mountain bikes.
 

RedRider

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Big thanks to everyone for your help.
Today there was a 10% off so i bought it.
50% off from regular price a new 2017 unsold bike
less 10% so i paid 2,115$ for a 4,800$canadian Ebike.
The weather is up and down fatbike-mountain bike so it wil take me 2 weeks to get a first impression. Cutting the bar, testing the proper stem, etc...
With 27.5x3.0 NobbyNics i might go a bit smaller, a bit more rolling depending on how it feels but it just feels like a quality bike that just fits between my fat and my mountain.
Since i do not have a car some days will be an hour of road/cycling path, 2 hours in the trails then back home.
 
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