Freed up a few bucks, ordered the Motor Goat V3 with accessories.

addertooth

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I was wanting a higher speed commuter bike than my Zeegr S1. The Zeegr S1 maxes out at about 32 MPH, but all the roads around me are 35 MPH.
I have gotten a lot of use out of the Zeegr, but wanted something which will keep up with the vehicular traffic.

The Zeegr does offer more torque (165 Newton-Meters (Zeegr), versus 110 Newton-Meters on the Motor Goat V3)
But, the top speed on the Goat is supposed to be about 44 MPH (with a rider of my weight), which will allow me to flow with traffic.

I am not a fan of the "Moped" style frame, but "Pretty is, what Pretty DOES". The version I ordered has pedals.
I ponied up for the second 60v 1200 Watt-Hour battery with the factory blender install kit. This will give it a total of 45 Amp Hours of capacity, and reduce any sense of "range anxiety".

I really needed a rear rack, to support Saddle Bags, so I ordered it. It is a bit odd that it also comes with a sissy-bar/backrest. But the sissy bar looks like it can be removed from the rear rack, and it will likely be removed during my assembly of the bike.

I like the fact it has front and rear 203mm hydraulic brakes which have 4 piston calipers. With that much "Go" it needs an equal amount of "whoa".
The bike was ordered today, with Mid-May being slated for delivery. It will be the latest variant with working blinking factory turn signals, brake light and head lamp.

I really struggled between the Wired Freedom and this bike. I liked the fact the Wired Freedom looked more "Bikish" as I must go on a Military base with it. The guards never questioned the 2000 Watt Zeeger. I didn't want to make the gate guards struggle with whether something is an (allowed) eBike or not.

Ultimately, the deciding factor was an available factory second battery pack with battery blender. I also liked the fact it had front turn signals on stalks, which make them stand out to car drivers.

Quite frankly, both potential choices met my "real" 35 MPH requirement. I had got bitten by the Zeeger, as it listed as a 35 MPH bike, but was only a 32 MPH bike, even with a 100 pound rider on it. It seems like it is a locked controller configuration on the Zeeger, as my weight and loaded saddle bags did not slow the bike down in the slightest.

The Goat appears to have Innova Hybrid tires on it from the factory, which is a tire I currently use on the Zeegr and really like.

For now, it is going to be about a 2 month wait. I won't have any real impression until about 30 days after that.

As ordered.jpg
 
I was wanting a higher speed commuter bike than my Zeegr S1. The Zeegr S1 maxes out at about 32 MPH, but all the roads around me are 35 MPH.
I have gotten a lot of use out of the Zeegr, but wanted something which will keep up with the vehicular traffic.

The Zeegr does offer more torque (180 Newton-Meters (Zeegr), versus 110 Newton-Meters on the Motor Goat V3)
But, the top speed on the Goat is supposed to be about 44 MPH (with a rider of my weight), which will allow me to flow with traffic.

I am not a fan of the "Moped" style frame, but "Pretty is, what Pretty DOES". The version I ordered has pedals.
I ponied up for the second 60v 1200 Watt-Hour battery with the factory blender install kit. This will give it a total of 45 Amp Hours of capacity, and reduce any sense of "range anxiety".

I really needed a rear rack, to support Saddle Bags, so I ordered it. It is a bit odd that it also comes with a sissy-bar/backrest. But the sissy bar looks like it can be removed from the rear rack, and it will likely be removed during my assembly of the bike.

I like the fact it has front and rear 203mm hydraulic brakes which have 4 piston calipers. With that much "Go" it needs an equal amount of "whoa".
The bike was ordered today, with Mid-May being slated for delivery. It will be the latest variant with working blinking factory turn signals, brake light and head lamp.

I really struggled between the Wired Freedom and this bike. I liked the fact the Wired Freedom looked more "Bikish" as I must go on a Military base with it. I didn't want to make the gate guards struggle with whether something is an (allowed) eBike or not.

Ultimately, the deciding factor was an available factory second battery pack with battery blender. I also liked the fact it had turn signals on stalks, which make them stand out to car drivers.

Quite frankly, both bikes met my "real" 35 MPH requirement. I had got bitten by the Zeeger, as it listed as a 35 MPH bike, but was only a 32 MPH bike, even with a 100 pound rider on it. It seems like it is a locked controller configuration on the Zeeger, as my weight and loaded saddle bags did not slow the bike down in the slightest.

The Goat appears to have Innova Hybrid tires on it from the factory, which is a tire I have used and really like.

For now, it is going to be about a 2 month wait. I won't have any real impression until about 30 days after that.

View attachment 13826
Keep us posted. I had been looking at this bike myself. I would of bought it over the freego if it was available at that time. I'm curious what 50amp controller they are using. I think they are running 72 volt batteries as well, or at least they measure 72+ volts when tested after charging.

Congrats on the new Pavement Pounder!
 
Keep us posted. I had been looking at this bike myself. I would of bought it over the freego if it was available at that time. I'm curious what 50amp controller they are using. I think they are running 72 volt batteries as well, or at least they measure 72+ volts when tested after charging.

Congrats on the new Pavement Pounder!
My understanding is that they are upgrading to a sine wave controller for those ordered in March, as well as a slight narrower front wheel to avoid rubs, and the rear turn signal blink as versus being on solid.

They keep doing incremental upgrades on the bike when issues are found, or to enhance the bike.
 
My understanding is that they are upgrading to a sine wave controller for those ordered in March, as well as a slight narrower front wheel to avoid rubs, and the rear turn signal blink as versus being on solid.

They keep doing incremental upgrades on the bike when issues are found, or to enhance the bike.
I think they are using a 50 amp Sabvoton controller on the newer motor goat V3, that's why I mentioned it in the above post.

The newest model is supposed to be a killer bike for the money. I'm curious to see 1 firsthand, soo you are going to have to get us a bunch of pics when you get it.
 
I think they are using a 50 amp Sabvoton controller on the newer motor goat V3, that's why I mentioned it in the above post.

The newest model is supposed to be a killer bike for the money. I'm curious to see 1 firsthand, soo you are going to have to get us a bunch of pics when you get it.
Most certainly. And I will cover the good, and also be honest about any shortcomings I encounter.
 
Keep us posted. I had been looking at this bike myself. I would of bought it over the freego if it was available at that time. I'm curious what 50amp controller they are using. I think they are running 72 volt batteries as well, or at least they measure 72+ volts when tested after charging.

Congrats on the new Pavement Pounder!
And yes, the fuel tank battery appears to be a 17S5P battery. The optional 2nd battery appears to be a 17S4P battery. As I recall the new batch of bikes in May are supposed to be using Samsung cells. Most likely 21700 50e cells.
 
And yes, the fuel tank battery appears to be a 17S5P battery. The optional 2nd battery appears to be a 17S4P battery. As I recall the new batch of bikes in May are supposed to be using Samsung cells. Most likely 21700 50e cells.
Yeah that is the bike I seen a sneak peek video of. It sounds like 1 hella bike for the money.
The sneak peek video mentioned the samsung 21700 cells. Plus I seen a peek of the controller, & it appeared to be a 50 amp Sabvoton controller in the vid I watched.

You should be able to ride for hours with the dual battery model & in PAS 2-3.
 
Yeah that is the bike I seen a sneak peek video of. It sounds like 1 hella bike for the money.
The sneak peek video mentioned the samsung 21700 cells. Plus I seen a peek of the controller, & it appeared to be a 50 amp Sabvoton controller in the vid I watched.

You should be able to ride for hours with the dual battery model & in PAS 2-3.
Yes, I am "guestimating" at least 4 to 5 hours at 20 MPH (roughly 500 Watt of motor power consumption).
 
Looking at it and thinking of the TailHappyTV review, here are my thoughts/guesses: (for whatever they're worth)

+ Cast wheels. On these heavier bikes, it's the only way to go.

+/- Don't get excited by a 72 V open circuit voltage. It's just 72 V / 4.2 V = 17S. Nominal is still 60 V and I'm glad they didn't try to advertise it as a 72 V bike; that would have been cheating.

+ Full twist throttle. Thanks for not playing games here

- Key switch location is a joke. The $300 Amazon bikes have this and if you have anything else on that keyring, your knees will be hitting it. It also will be very easy to hotwire there, but I'm sure you plan on locking it up. My Sailnovo had the ignition key there:
1712154408841.png


- The sissy bar is a real joke mostly because of the seat shape, which is obviously for one person, not two. Where's your girl going to sit, on that hump? :rolleyes:
1712154353887.png


+ I like that bar lock that's included and its onboard storage. I hope it isn't too rattly. It's going to be damned tough to just roll it away.

+ Remote reservoir rear shock; this could be good, if the reservoir is not just decorative!
1712154594433.png


+ Street tread tires, but with enough knobbiness that they could be aired down and do OK on gravel roads or smoother dirt trails.

- Front fender is for style only. Booo!
1712154727002.png


+ Rear light assy. seems to have turn signals and a reflector integrated. Nice:
1712154789430.png


?? Rear suspension says "450 lbs. rated" I hope that doesn't mean it's way over-sprung for one person, like my HyperScrambler2 (HS2) is...

+/- Innova makes good tires. I like the street pattern ones that came on my HS2, despite all the complaining by FJester on YouTube. The key to to question the inflation spec., as they often will just copy what's written on the side of the tire into the manual but leave off the "max". They advise to inflate to 35 or 40 psi., but every other 20x4 tire ebike is more like 20 psi. I figure this is a heavier one, so I ran it at 20 psi in the winter for a large contact patch and am up to 25 psi now with good grip.

?? This is getting into a speed range where cops may not just give you a pass any more. You'll be riding at gas scooter speeds, taking a lane, but with no plates.

- The headlight looks a little cheesy. Won't be Japanese quality, I'm sure. I hope I'm wrong. (The one on my HS2 looks good, but is kind of cheesy anyway. I had to waller out the slots with a Dremel and a carbide burr on the brackets to get it to aim straight.

Range:
Range of 56 Miles (Pedal Assist Mode) or 37 Miles (All Electric Mode)
It is probably 37 miles at full throttle when it's still locked at Class 2 = 20 mph. Better plan on about half that. Maybe 40 miles @ 25 mph?

Acceleration probably won't be what you're used to, as it is a direct drive motor, however there are very few moving parts in a direct drive motor. It'll mostly be down to the quality of the ball bearings and there will be no maintenance.

I have the same issue on my HS2 as you did on your last eBike. It's very fast for an eBike, but still not scooter fast. Not fast enough to keep up on a 30 or 35 mph marked road. Here, you'll have one that is scooter fast. I only question the value at this point. One could get a nice used Honda Metropolitan 49cc scooter for probably $1500 and that $2k you saved goes a long way toward gas, (110 mpg) moped registration, and liability insurance. On the scooter, you could go 100 miles on a $3 tank of gas at 38 mph. Plus Honda quality throughout.
 
Smaug,
Very good points, and it appears that the "goat people" read your post. They now have a longer length front fender available for purchase.
Also, that range you quoted was for a single battery. That single battery is 25 Ah. However, they have a dual battery kit available. I ordered it which offers a total of 45 Ah of capacity.

I am a big fan of Innova tires. I purchased some for my Zeeger. I run 28 PSI in them. They have a thicker than normal carcas; they are probably truly good for their rated 30 PSI value.

I also agree that police tolerance could diminish if I zip around at 45. I will probably stick to 35 or under for most my riding. My existing bike will do 32, but it lives most its life at 21 MPH.

And, as if the bike-gods wanted to laugh at me:
The wired freedom is available with a second battery, at no additional cost. With both batteries it is still a lesser 35 Ah of capacity.

But wait, there is more. Now there are two sources for an even larger 50 Ah battery which fits in that void between the pedals and the front fork down-tube. So, in about two months, there will be some 75 Ah goats running around.
 
75 Ah would give this a truly useful range.

Point of reference, the Juiced HS2 pilots are quoting about 35-40 miles of range at full throttle (~ 28-33 mph) with its 38.4 Ah worth of 52 V batteries. I haven't had the guts to do a full range test yet, as I live halfway up a hill and pedaling that beast home with a dead battery was real work! (the one time I let it happen)
 
Just a quick update. I am now over 2 months and 2 weeks of waiting time. I still have not received notification of shipping yet.
Humorously, if you go to their web page, it promises shipping by the end of June, for eBikes ordered in June (Mine was ordered in March). The vendor really should post on their website what order numbers they have processed, just to give those who are waiting a bit of insight.
Back on the 29th of May, they stated they were about 85 orders away from my order number. They indicated they were getting out about 20 eBikes a day.

Considering I have been waiting 2 and a half months for mine to arrive (and I ordered before public interest peaked), if find in unlikely that anyone who orders an eBike today, will have it shipped within 3 weeks. But then, I have heard there is a wait for both the eCells and the Wired Freedom as well.

Perhaps there was no winning move available to choose from when it comes to some of the faster eBikes.

I am sure glad I got my existing Zeeger eBike on hand, it gets the job done.
 
The bike arrived today. I learned a couple days ago there will about another 2 weeks before the rear rack and second battery kit will arrive.
I will probably defer measuring top speed until the second pack arrives, as you get less voltage sag with two batteries. This should equate to a slightly higher top speed with both batteries in place.

The box was in good shape and was not missing any components for the Goat.
The packing inside was very orderly and neat, nothing was wedged for binding. This made things easier to get out of the box.
The contents inside appeared to be very well packed. The picture showing the bike outside the box shows how much padding they put on it.

Assembly was pretty typical for all my previous eBikes, with the addition of the extra components like the front turn signal on stalks and pegs for the rear position on the Goat. I still can't imagine two "American sized adults" sitting on that saddle though.

I do a bit of welding, and my stepson is a college-trained welder. We both inspected the welds. The penetration and regularity of the weld looked pretty solid. The only complaint was the tail-light bracket was welded offset from the center of the frame. For some reason, this annoyed me more than it should have (picture 10). Also, before the bike was packed up at the factory, there was some scratches on the frame. I filled the scratches in with a sharpie pen, until I can do the fix right. The bike had been well padded in the "scratched area" in the box, which tells me those scratches happened before it was put in the box (probably at the factory).

I did not go with the factory mirrors, as my shoulders tend to block the view of traffic to the rear. I instead popped off the handlebar endcap on the left side and installed a MeaChow end of handlebar mirror. It is worth noting the "bolt" which holds the handlebar endcap on is not an actual bolt. Rather, it is a plastic piece which presses into a metal "speed nut". No amount of unscrewing will loosen it. It must simply be pried off. An aftermarket phone holder was installed on the "less busy" right hand side of the handlebar. The left side has all the controls for emergency flasher, turn signals, headlamp off/high-beam/low-beam as well as the overall controls for the Goat (on/off, PAS level, etc.).

At this point, the Goat only has about 10 miles on it. It has only been taken for a couple quick jaunts. The first was to my vehicle insurance company to get some liability insurance on it. The second was a pleasure ride with my wife this evening. She has her own eBike.

I did (briefly) get an error code 6 after going over a bump, but it cleared up almost immediately. I probably need to double check all the electrical connections on the Goat.

I put my phone GPS in the handlebar holder to confirm the accuracy of the speedometer. It appeared to have a 1 MPH error at 20 MPH. The Goats Speedometer showed a speed of 21 MPH. This would equate to it reading 42 MPH, when actual speed is 40. I haven't done a top speed test yet, but I can comfortably say the Goat does "over 40" based upon a short sprint performed with the Goat.

Another thing worth noting my "Butt Dyno" indicates the torque produced by the motor exceeds the factory rating of 110 Newton-Meter. I have another bike rated at 164 Newton-Meter, but it does not toss me back like the Goat does under initial acceleration.

They hydraulic 4 piston brakes bedded in quickly on the Goat. The big 203mm front and rear discs do not struggle to bring the Goat to a sudden stop. The headlamp was quite bright, and the selectable high/low beam changes where the light is projected and the overall pattern of the light it casts. The turns signals, brake light, running lights (front and rear), as well as the emergency flashers all worked as advertised.

The bench seat was quite comfortable for riding, but I suspect it would rub my thighs if I were forced to pedal for any real length of time.

Pictures below...

scale 1 Arrived 13 June 2024 in box.jpg
scale 2 Box opened but not unpacked.jpg
scale 3 tools and accessories.jpg
scale 4 endless padding to remove.jpg
scale 5 headlamp and turn signals.jpg
scale 6 mirros and clamps.jpg
scale 7 handlebar end cap removed for mirror.jpg
scale 8 paint scratches on frame.jpg
scale 9 assembled with mirror and phone holder.jpg
scale 10 tail light bracket not welded centered.jpg
 
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