Ebike distance

Zepper

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What is best mileage (distance)on a single charge on a 48 volt 17 amp hour battery using a Bafang 1000 watt BBSHD motor.
 
What is best mileage (distance)on a single charge on a 48 volt 17 amp hour battery using a Bafang 1000 watt BBSHD motor.
Your weight, the speed you are traveling, the land you ride on, like are there hills or no?
Are you using PAS, which level, are you just using throttle?

In my opinion, that battery should get you around 15 up to 20 or so miles per charge if you ride in PAS 1-3 possibly.
 
Who makes the best apple pie? How high is UP?

Pedal all day and use little to no motor on flat ground with a tailwind?

OR, do the only thing that justifies the expense and hassle of a mid-drive, and climb hills for an hour or two?

Hills? Talked to a guy once who had "hills". That's what he said. "hills". That's ALL he said about where he lived, which was in the foothills for the freakin' Swiss Alps.

Hills?????

If you have specific data, or even general data, go to any decent Ebike simulator, plug in the numbers, plug in A RANGE of numbers, and you will get a VERY MUCH better idea than from a few random answers with no surrounding factors, from here.
 
What is best mileage (distance)on a single charge on a 48 volt 17 amp hour battery using a Bafang 1000 watt BBSHD motor.
1st of all why would you be using a 48V battery with a BBSHD? 52V (58.8v fully charged) batteries are a perfect fit with BaFang mid-drive controllers. Using a higher-voltage battery lets you get a much longer range without having to fully change the pack extending it's life significantly. There's only one way to learn how far you can ride your ebike in your area... ride, ride lots. Maximizing range on an ebike is an art and a learned skill. Don't listen to others' guesses or the bloated numbers manufacturers provide to sell their low-end crap. Don't try to apply some hokie chart or graph, and don't take suggestions from riders who don't really ride. If you really want to know how far you can ride then prove it.
https://www.relive.cc/view/vMv85EGzYNO
https://photos.app.goo.gl/9ZbuKQNWsHtRH3Ft7
 
1st of all why would you be using a 48V battery with a BBSHD? 52V (58.8v fully charged) batteries are a perfect fit with BaFang mid-drive controllers. Using a higher-voltage battery lets you get a much longer range without having to fully change the pack extending it's life significantly. There's only one way to learn how far you can ride your ebike in your area... ride, ride lots. Maximizing range on an ebike is an art and a learned skill. Don't listen to others' guesses or the bloated numbers manufacturers provide to sell their low-end crap. Don't try to apply some hokie chart or graph, and don't take suggestions from riders who don't really ride. If you really want to know how far you can ride then prove it.

Well said there!
 
It's very common that brands w/BBHSD or BBSHD builds to have 48V. 48V was the "original spec" for the the BBSHD - which later migrated to "up to 52V" ....
 
I would recommend you don't waste much time listening to people who are proven posers who do nothing but blow their own horn and have been shown to not know jack squat.

Getting good mileage is neither art nor skill. It is nothing more than acquiring a basic understanding of the factors involved and applying them to your particular situation and usage pattern. No magic involved here. Speed, load, watts.

Just one basic would be understanding how regen braking works. Getting the right motor for the job, and using it at its best efficiency. Higher voltage may go faster, but the increased wind resistance at speeds well over 25mph, without adding a LOT more amps, will actually result in LOWER range.
 
In eBike Space - "Fat TireeBikes" and "Range" - is someone can come up with a "fix" that will enable a 3-legged horse win the Kentucky Derby ?

The real wheeler experts on efficiency and range - are the road bikers who go out and pedal aa "Century" (100 miles circuit) every weekend !
 
In eBike Space - "Fat TireeBikes" and "Range" - is someone can come up with a "fix" that will enable a 3-legged horse win the Kentucky Derby ?

The real wheeler experts on efficiency and range - are the road bikers who go out and pedal aa "Century" (100 miles circuit) every weekend !
And I agree. Physics cannot be denied. You can reduce some of the challenges by going to higher pressure street tires (I have seen street-tread fat tires rated at 35 PSI pressure). I normally run about 8 to 10 PSI on my current set of "knobby tires". I could see how they would reduce rolling resistance and make for a quieter ride.

A lot of the fat tire bikes owners enjoy the additional cushioning the soft squishy tires offer them. Like all things, it is a trade off.
I cannot guess how much rougher the higher pressure tires would make the ride. I will likely have to buy a set to have a meaningful opinion.

But yes, fat tire bikes are NOT all about efficiency. Like all things, you can optimize them within limits, but you can never change what they really are.
 
What all the above comments say is true. On my fat bike with a 48V 17.5AH rack mount battery I can easily get between 60 to 80 km's range. This is how I do that - At the beginning of my ride the power level is zero which only runs the display. If I encounter a hill it is moved to 1 or 2. A speed of around 16kph or 10 mph works for me and helps keep my legs happy and when the power level is put to 1 or 2 I try to maintain that speed. And road riders pass me ALL the time. And in my city it's flat except for small hills and the odd overpass so there's that.
When riding offroad on favorite singletrack where it is hilly and often cold and snowy because friends and I ride most of the winter for recreation in local parks 30 to 40 km's is the norm. There I use level 1 and go up to 2 for the hills I tackle. However the usual is a 20 km ride round trip to a ski cabin where we build a fire to dry off, have a sandwhich etc. It takes 45 minutes to get to the cabin. Full charge when starting is 54.6V, when getting back to the truck it's usually around 48V. The colder it is the higher the power consumption and I pause riding after 20 below celcius.
 
A further clarification to my above post, those results are on my 2 wheel fatbike . On my 3 wheel delta recumbent which runs on 20 by 1,5" schwalbe marathon tires and has 2 48V batteries I run a 500 watt bafang front hub geared motor and it has a 60 tooth front sprocket which I always pedal the best range I ever got was around 100 km's or 60 miles. There was power left but I'd had enough. Same flat city, variable wind but higher speeds maintained throughout, usually around 24 kph. With the small 20" wheels you need a larger front gear to get any speed. I'm currently building another delta which has 20 x 2.8" rear wheels and has my BBSO2 mid drive motor. No idea of it's range yet though I don't expect it to be great.
 
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