eBike diagnostic tool

biknut

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Concidering how hard it is to find a shop that will repair your eBike it's imparative for us to own some basic eBike spicific tools, and learn how to use them. I personally find Youtube to be very helpful in this reguard. The first thing on everyones list should be a volt meter, or DVM. Next you need to learn how to solder. And another tool I find very valuable is this inexpensive eBike diagnostic tool.

This tool allows you to test motor windings, controllers, hall sensors, and brake cut off switches. Every eBike tool box should have one. They're easy to find on Amazon, eBay, or Aliexpress.
 

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Does it come with adapter cable(s) or do you have to source or make up your own.
In most cases you will have to make your own adapter, but it's not that difficult. The tool itself is pretty easy to figure out how to use. The Youtubes help alot by explaining how to hook it up, and you can see how they connected to the plugs
 
I bought one of these testers. The one I have (can't speak for all of them if they are made by different crew) has a major and misleading test (the sequence the phase lights are supposed to flash at). It is WRONG!

While it does do all the other tests, it actually does nothing that can't be done with a multi meter and a couple simply tests following the instructions for testing that can be found on the internet. For example testing phase wiring to the motor is no more complex that connecting any two phase wires together and rotate the rear wheel feeling for 'chugging'. No need to describe it, you'll feel it instantly compared to the wires not connected.
 
I bought one of these testers. The one I have (can't speak for all of them if they are made by different crew) has a major and misleading test (the sequence the phase lights are supposed to flash at). It is WRONG!

While it does do all the other tests, it actually does nothing that can't be done with a multi meter and a couple simply tests following the instructions for testing that can be found on the internet. For example testing phase wiring to the motor is no more complex that connecting any two phase wires together and rotate the rear wheel feeling for 'chugging'. No need to describe it, you'll feel it instantly compared to the wires not connected.
To test the phase wires to the motor all you need do is ohm out the windings. If they're all the same the windings are good. Testing the phase wires to the controller as far as I know can't really be done with a multi meter, I think you'd need a oscilloscope without this tool. Testing the hall sensors is a lot easier with this tool also.
 
Testing the phase wires to the controller as far as I know can't really be done with a multi meter, I think you'd need a oscilloscope without this tool.
The phase wires are easily tested with a mustimeter, measuring resistance. Measure the resistance from the red battery connection wire to each of the 3 phase wires. Repeat using the black battery connection.

A link explained exactly how to do it complete with pictures .... Testing controller
 
The phase wires are easily tested with a mustimeter, measuring resistance. Measure the resistance from the red battery connection wire to each of the 3 phase wires. Repeat using the black battery connection.

A link explained exactly how to do it complete with pictures .... Testing controller
I wonder what happens if a bad capacitor?
 
I wonder what happens if a bad capacitor?

I believe this will show up in the controller resistance test. It's been a while since I did them, so can't remember whether its when you connect to the positive or negative battery lead when testing the phase wire resistances. But with one of them the resistance will show stable initially, but then change into a moving reading (can't remember if its a decreasing or increasing reading).

This perplexed me for a while till I found a technical document that said that was normal, and is caused by the capacitor charging itself. It only does it on one of the battery leads. The other lead remains a rock solid reading.
 
The tester I bought plugged straight in to the matching popular connectors, with identical coloured phase wires fitted with small alligator clips. It just connected straight up. It was a no brainer to connect.
 
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