Drivetrain Conundrum

Casterson

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I'm looking for thoughts on going Shimano SLX versus SRAM Eagle, or otherwise, with reasonable (relatively affordable compared to ridiculously pro-rider-priced components) around drivetrain component group price point.

I got a GREAT deal on a rear wheel with SLX (Shimano micro-spline) hub for reportedly smooth 12-speed shifting. This means I'm moving to microspline and SLX component group unless I'm convinced otherwise.

For those who don't know, SLX is Shimano's Hyperglide drivetrain system with 10-45 or 10-51 cassettes. They, from what I've read, offer very smooth shifting and great incremental jumps yielding consistent RPM, and theoretically better motor+battery performance from ideal motor tork loads. These things garner much discussion. I also like the idea of going from 11 to the 10 teeth for my big gear garnering a bit of added speed umph (when appropriate).

There's a lot of debate about number of cogs (8, 9, 10, 11 and 12), with opinions both technical and/or personal. But I'm reading and U-tubing some technically pro-level savvy analysts who are mostly FOR 12-speed cassettes. One reason being what is mentioned above, 12's yield smaller increments between gears for smoother shifting, and more consistent motor RPM. And in regard to the SLX Hyperglide Drivetrain component group, it reportedly performs better with larger ebike tork, smooth shifting under load going up hills, etc.

Some folks like me grew up with, and lean toward Shimano, but are completely open to and/or use other drivetrain manufacturers. At least one analyst spoke of moving from SRAM Eagle to Shimano SLX. I just haven't read conclusive results on field-use comparisons on performance and durability, SRAM versus SLX, both technical and bang for your buck.

So, long-winded story short, I'm asking for input around this conundrum, if anybody wants to kindly discuss and offer up some analysis.

Thanks much!
 
Okay, I lied, confused, sorry. Dang it anyway...

First, and please correct me if I'm wrong, again, SRAM microspline hubs are NOT compatible with Shimano microspline cassettes. Whatever. Sucks.
Second, LINKglide is the new Shimano drivetrain tech. Linkglide is available on Deore XT, and NOT in their SLX lineup. Linkglide only offers 11-speed cassettes.
So, unless there's another option, like bailing out of this whole Shimano and/or microspline thing, IF I want to use my new wheel with the Shimano microspline hub, I'll have to go with either Deore XT Hyperglide, Deore XT Linkglide, or SLX Linkglide.

Wow, what have I gotten myself into?
 
Most people with ebikes find they do not really need their gears much anymore. Been over a year since I have shifted at all. "Small increments between the gears" is just something the ebiker no longer needs to worry about.
 
Hmmm, think I understand., maybe overkill for leisurely riders, certainly for folks moved to greener pastures in new auto-shifting transmission rigs. My inquiry was perhaps for myself and other folks.

For sake of argument, say you're an old geezer like me that moves along a variety of slope and speed, or hauling kids and need to shift into an easier gear, with them and groceries and the dog on-board, or commuting, up and down hills. Say you're moving at a good clip 20-25mph on a road-style Ebike, big gear @46T chainring, 11T in back. Then you stop and/or hit an incline, or you're on a mountain-Ebike, 32T in front and 11T rear tearing down-slope, then shift to the granny-gear for climbing. In these scenarios, if you don't shift out of that big gear, no way a motor can push you along, or it's a slog.

If you're riding with or without kids, groceries and/or briefcase, or the sort comfortable shifting for easiest/best peddling/cadence, you might use every gear in your inventory. It's undisputable that when using too big of a gear because you're NOT shifting up i.e., pedaling hard and slowly, your motor is working too hard. Your controller, wiring, motor and battery are over-worked, hot, batteries burn out and controllers fry, and you're stuck heading up a river without a paddle.

Just today I was, big smile, screaming down a hill and wishing I had that 10T cog microspline hubs offer. Then up a steep hill wishing I had a smaller gear, thinking it would be nice to have smoother smaller steps between a couple gears. Clearly, I'm an over-thinking engineer-type, maybe old-school, but like many others I prefer to switch gears, nice easy pedaling, even cadence, and not burn thru battery and controller.

For us seeking parts that will work well for ebikes, in my case because I need a new drivetrain, got a great deal on a very nice new wheel with microspline hub for just $100, was told it's the cat's pajamas, I'm considering options and wanting advice. Maybe I should dump it, forget microspline, go another direction? Or just stop shifting?
 
I put a SRAM EX1 11 to 48 8 speed on my mid-drive and love it. It is designed for ebikes. Before I was double sifting most of the time. Now I can hold a gear longer and the EX1 can sift under full load. Comes with a solid roller chain. Put it on and then adjust the size of the chain ring to your liking. It is top shelve stuff made for ebikes not regular bikes.
 
Most people with ebikes find they do not really need their gears much anymore. Been over a year since I have shifted at all. "Small increments between the gears" is just something the ebiker no longer needs to worry about.
I'm not sure what class or type of bike you have but your answer leads me to believe you have a throttle type with a hub motor??? To say you don't need gears on a mid drive torque sensing motor is ridiculous. You might as well not have pedals and just use your throttle. Mini motorcycle
 
11-46 and a 46 front chainring. I usually go from second gear up to fourth gear mainly. Sometimes i use first gear and rarely ever use fifth gear.

My rides, i try to keep on mostly flat roads but i have some hills that are doozies LOL

Trying to stay around 9mph up to 12mph on the Road settings, gets me some insane mileage per charge.
When i need to go faster i push the offroad button and get up to around 20mph just to keep the police off me lol

Welcome to our humble home @ERidesOn2 :cool:

HP
 
11-46 and a 46 front chainring. I usually go from second gear up to fourth gear mainly. Sometimes i use first gear and rarely ever use fifth gear.

My rides, i try to keep on mostly flat roads but i have some hills that are doozies LOL

Trying to stay around 9mph up to 12mph on the Road settings, gets me some insane mileage per charge.
When i need to go faster i push the offroad button and get up to around 20mph just to keep the police off me lol

Welcome to our humble home @ERidesOn2 :cool:

HP
I appreciate the welcome. I'm fairly new ebike owner. I was researched over a year before I bought a Priority Current for my wife. The hope was that we can do longer rides together. So far I've been using it way more. It is fun.
 
I appreciate the welcome. I'm fairly new ebike owner. I was researched over a year before I bought a Priority Current for my wife. The hope was that we can do longer rides together. So far I've been using it way more. It is fun.
Are you happy with this purchase? I'm thinking about purchasing the Priority Current as well. Let me know your impressions.
 
I switched my Yamaha Cross Core to a 1x11 SLX, 46t chainring, 11-42 cassette. I have no regrets. We ride a combination of tar and gravel, with some grades over 20%. I generally keep the assist in eco and use the gears as needed to maintain my cadence. I come from a lifetime of riding road bikes and many years on mountain bikes, so my style of riding might be considered old school, (that’s ok, I am kind of old). I still ride my conventional road bike, but I am enjoying the assist.
 
Most people with ebikes find they do not really need their gears much anymore. Been over a year since I have shifted at all. "Small increments between the gears" is just something the ebiker no longer needs to worry about.
Oh I don't know about that, I use the pedal assist levels and gears a lot to keep the effort I have put into riding at a level I want.
 
Have a look at 'microshift' - the cassettes (range of 11-48) are compatible with shimano freewheels. If you need to buy a Microshift derailleur then replacement shifters will also be needed but you may be surprised how much cheaper they are than some other brands..
 
Have a look at 'microshift' - the cassettes (range of 11-48) are compatible with shimano freewheels. If you need to buy a Microshift derailleur then replacement shifters will also be needed but you may be surprised how much cheaper they are than some other brands..
Any word on how they hold under heavy use?
 
Currently 8 speed 11-46 tooth cassette fitted to bike with 250W Bafang mid drive (crank) but haven't done sufficient miles to advise on life of cassette or life of derailleur.
 
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