Does this bike exist

BeachBikeGal

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I currently ride a mountain bike on the beach. It's usually windy in one direction, so I am considering an e-bike Does this bike exist:
Rider: 5'3", 135 lbs, 70 years old
Terrain: Beach ride at low tide with flat, firm-packed sand. Tires on my mountain bike are about 2" to handle sand.
Distance: about 25 miles (out-and-back ride, e-bike assistance needed in one direction only, due to wind)
Speed: slow (scenic beach ride)
WEIGHT (this is the catch!): MUST BE LIGHT! There are about 8 steps from the walkway down to the beach. My mountain bike is less than 25 pounds, which I can carry up and down the steps. Local stores seem to feature bikes that are too heavy for me to carry.
Extras: Do NOT need fenders, rack, kickstand, lights, suspension, tubeless tires, folding, or security features
Price: Flexible
THANK YOU for your suggestions.
 
Fat tires & lightweight doesn't quite mix.
If lightweight is priority, likely it is not going to be cheap.
If it get really windy, likely you'll need a strong motor & decent size battery, those are not going to be lightweight.
 
I currently ride a mountain bike on the beach. It's usually windy in one direction, so I am considering an e-bike Does this bike exist:
Rider: 5'3", 135 lbs, 70 years old
Terrain: Beach ride at low tide with flat, firm-packed sand. Tires on my mountain bike are about 2" to handle sand.
Distance: about 25 miles (out-and-back ride, e-bike assistance needed in one direction only, due to wind)
Speed: slow (scenic beach ride)
WEIGHT (this is the catch!): MUST BE LIGHT! There are about 8 steps from the walkway down to the beach. My mountain bike is less than 25 pounds, which I can carry up and down the steps. Local stores seem to feature bikes that are too heavy for me to carry.
Extras: Do NOT need fenders, rack, kickstand, lights, suspension, tubeless tires, folding, or security features
Price: Flexible
THANK YOU for your suggestions.

Hi and Welcome to the forums Gal :)

So a 25 mile ride total, slow speeds like 9 up to 12mph then?

You already have a bike you are comfortable with right?

Do you have any grandsons that may be able to assist you in putting a mid drive system on your bike?

So a BBSHD mid drive 750w kit paired with a 48v 20ah battery will do exactly what you desire.

Send me a msg if you have any questions.

Ride Safe! :cool:

HP
 
Use your existing bike. Light, 36V, geared front hub, 6-8 lbs, Bottle battery of 10-12 amps, easily removable to reduce weight.

Simple install, minimal weight, if you can change a flat tire you can install it.
 
I appreciate the thoughtful replies. My current beach bike is a Titus Racer X. (For trails, I now use a Pivot Mach 4.) In the smallest size, these bikes have the stand-over height that I need and are light enough for me to handle. Will consider the suggestions for adding a hub/battery to the Titus. Am also considering the Cannondale Quick Neo sl2 Remixte. Weight is under 35 lbs. Tires are 38c, which hopefully could handle hard-packed beach sand? Finding availability for size small seems to be a challenge. My first mountain bike (decades ago!) was a Cannondale Super V, which I loved. I may also post in the Cannondale forum. Thanks.
 
I personally do not think a 38C will be good for beach sand, 2" would be about 51c.

If you go with that, try and test ride that bike or a similar one with the same tires.

I run a 38 front, not on the beach but do sometimes hit some deep sand patches for short distance. Not packed, like close to the water, but not loose either. Somewhat packed from car tires. Front tire digs in pretty good. Not unmanageable, but somewhat less than ideal.

Also, check local regulations, one beach near me recently banned ebikes from the beach. Too many idiots annoying the tourists. Go slow and you should be OK. Another reason to convert a non-electric bike instead of a factory ebike, maybe a bit less obvious.
 
I currently ride a mountain bike on the beach...
If you enjoy the bike you are currently riding have someone mount a BaFang Mid-drive and find a 52V battery that will fit the frame ($1000 to $1500). The motor will add approximately 6 pounds and the battery between 8 and 17 pounds depending on the capacity. Ebikes aren't light, you won't notice it while riding much but most certainly will when moving the bike around. Don't ever ask someone (especially here) to recommend something they don't own and haven't ever ridden. A bike with 3" rubber and a washing machine motor (hub motor) would be fun at the beach and reasonably inexpensive. Ride safe.
 
Unless you live on one of those rare beaches with significant hills, there is no reason to pay twice the price, have a more difficult install, deal with regular chain replacement, and have an unrideable bike if the motor fails, by purchasing a mid-drive.

The paid shills who push a mid-drive for every single rider, who recommend ONLY ONE brand of mid-drive, and do not understand the basic mechanics of how a hub drive works, should be ashamed of themselves.

That ONE BRAND of mid-drive is the only one with a large US dealer, who pays these unethical shills for each post they make pimping his products. There are other, better brands of mid-drive, and there are much better solutions to your issue, such as the lightweight hub I suggested. Note I did not mention a particular brand. Lighter weight, easier install, no regular maintenance, lower price, does not affect drivetrain leaving a rideable bike if the motor fails. But, no paid salesman who lie and deceive for an easy buck.
 
For you, a fat tire eBike may be the key. The fatter the tires, the more sure-footed it's going to be on sand. (even packed)

Rather than focus on the weight of the bike, maybe you can focus on an alternative way to get it up & down those eight steps: for example, many hub motor eBikes have a "Walk Mode", which lets you press and hold one button and it powers the bike at a walking pace. You can power it up the steps with the help of this. Down the steps, just modulate the rear brake to keep it under control. It won't be TOO bouncy, since the tires run at only 20 PSI...
 
I converted an old mountain bike that has 26" wheels with a front wheel drive and ebike conversion kit purchased on Ebay. The battery was sold separately. The wheel is 750 watt and with the battery pack was total expense of around $500 and two hours labor . . . and it's got major league torque and speed, much more than my Rad Mission! or Aventon Soltaire7. I did not install the pedal assist and just use the twist throttle when I want power.
 
The OP is age 70, IMO 750W would be a bit too much power, but she could be one of those radical biker chicks wanting to terrorize the locals.

Probably not.

Side note - The "fat tire" bike was originally known as a "Beach Bike", first saw them many years ago before they became a fad. Just not practical at all on nearly any other surface. Early ones had some truly HUGE tires. Other than an advertising draw, very few were sold and it mostly died out.
This was before ebikes were at all common. Takes power to roll those big tires.
 
@Nelson37 . I'm 75 next month. From what I read this is someone I'd like to ride with . . . and seems able to handle it. BTW, Nelson too.
 
The OP is age 70, IMO 750W would be a bit too much power, but she could be one of those radical biker chicks wanting to terrorize the locals.

Probably not.

Side note - The "fat tire" bike was originally known as a "Beach Bike", first saw them many years ago before they became a fad. Just not practical at all on nearly any other surface. Early ones had some truly HUGE tires. Other than an advertising draw, very few were sold and it mostly died out.
This was before ebikes were at all common. Takes power to roll those big tires.
 
Actually I ride a 4" fat tire, 26" 72 pound e bike. I don't find the effort to ride this bike with zero power from the motor hard at all. From a start sure it takes effort and climbing hills you feel the weight far more than the effects of the wide tires. Remember when riding on hard surfaces this wide tires still only put down a very small footprint that contacts the pavement.

IMHO the disadvantages of the FAT tires are their weight not the rolling resistance. Yes it greater than a small road bike tire pumped up to 90+ PSI but not the main disadvantage. Oh and BTW I'm 76 yr old.
 
There are light e-bikes in the 38 pound range. As long as you have money they exist. Specialized Makes SL line stands for super light. Orbea makes prob the lightest ebike out there. Massive sticker shock though
 
I currently ride a mountain bike on the beach. It's usually windy in one direction, so I am considering an e-bike Does this bike exist:
Rider: 5'3", 135 lbs, 70 years old
Terrain: Beach ride at low tide with flat, firm-packed sand. Tires on my mountain bike are about 2" to handle sand.
Distance: about 25 miles (out-and-back ride, e-bike assistance needed in one direction only, due to wind)
Speed: slow (scenic beach ride)
WEIGHT (this is the catch!): MUST BE LIGHT! There are about 8 steps from the walkway down to the beach. My mountain bike is less than 25 pounds, which I can carry up and down the steps. Local stores seem to feature bikes that are too heavy for me to carry.
Extras: Do NOT need fenders, rack, kickstand, lights, suspension, tubeless tires, folding, or security features
Price: Flexible
THANK YOU for your suggestions.
Hi,
It looks like you are not a power/speed nut, just want some help on the upwind run. If your current bike is good for you, then this kit might be what you are looking for. The drives is just a friction contact with the rear tire. I have not tried one, but it has good reviews. one is pretty through and includes a link to the company.
(copy and paste) The link to the product is https://www.rubbee.co it is a British Company. If you get one I would be interested in how you like it.
 
On my BBSHD powered fatbike for obstacles like stairs or steep hills that I don't feel comfortable riding up what I do is walk it using a light touch on the throttle to climb the stair maybe a step or two or a short way up a steep hill while keeping one hand on the right brake in order to shut the motor down. The bike has a walk mode but it's never been used/needed.
 
I currently ride a mountain bike on the beach. It's usually windy in one direction, so I am considering an e-bike Does this bike exist:
Rider: 5'3", 135 lbs, 70 years old
Terrain: Beach ride at low tide with flat, firm-packed sand. Tires on my mountain bike are about 2" to handle sand.
Distance: about 25 miles (out-and-back ride, e-bike assistance needed in one direction only, due to wind)
Speed: slow (scenic beach ride)
WEIGHT (this is the catch!): MUST BE LIGHT! There are about 8 steps from the walkway down to the beach. My mountain bike is less than 25 pounds, which I can carry up and down the steps. Local stores seem to feature bikes that are too heavy for me to carry.
Extras: Do NOT need fenders, rack, kickstand, lights, suspension, tubeless tires, folding, or security features
Price: Flexible
THANK YOU for your suggestions.
Lectric XP light may the right bike for you.
 
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