Controller and battery have 2 different connectors, how do I connect them?

emilyarchibald

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Hello, Im very new at this. Trying to build an etrike. The battery has a different end than the positive and negative wires coming from the controller. How would I connect them? Any help is appreciated! Thank you.
 
Thanks so much for your response! Just to clarify, which ends should I be cutting? The ones coming from the battery or the green-tipped ones coming from the controller? Also, any idea what their names are? I think the larger connectors might be Andersen connectors? Thanks!
 
Thanks so much for your response! Just to clarify, which ends should I be cutting? The ones coming from the battery or the green-tipped ones coming from the controller? Also, any idea what their names are? I think the larger connectors might be Andersen connectors? Thanks!
Either end can be cut then you'll have to get the correct ends to re-connect them.

I use XT-90 anti spark connectors but you can get away with XT-60 connectors if you desire...no need to overcomplicate things
because there is so much to learn ;)

Have a Great Day :cool:
 
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And that yellow box...BE Careful there...Make Sure the connections are ALL TIGHT because there have been some
issues/fires/melted wires from loose connections within those yellow boxes.

Hope that helps :)
 
@emilyarchibald I put together a sort of how-to on this stuff that may be helpful to you, starting from scratch as you are. This gets into the tools as well as illustrating the techniques. That includes the right butt-end connectors and adhesive heat shrink. Don't let any of that concern you. Just check out the articles. Part 1 is tools and Part 2 is a step by step guide.


The Anderson connectors are the ones in the foreground of your picture. Those are not my favorites and I always replace them. As @HumanPerson noted above, an XT90 anti spark (aka XT90S) connector is pretty much the gold standard for this sort of thing.

Worth mentioning: You could buy an Anderson-to-Bullet Plug adapter and then have an Anderson-to-Anderson connection.


I would not go there as XT90's are head-and-shoulders better. That link also shows you an Anderson-to-XT90 adapter which, if you care concerned about working with hot battery leads, would turn that side into plug-and-play so you only have to do a crimp on your controller side.
 
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The only thing I'd add to this thread, is don't scrimp and not buy a quality at least 'semi-professional' crimp tool. Cheap glorified pliers will NOT do the job. They are total junk.
With a quality ratchet style tool, with color coded jaws matching the color of the connector, and paying attention the bared end is the correct length etc. doing other than a quality crimp is near impossible.
 
you could either get a new set of Anderson plugs to go on the controller side. BUT i would go with soldered ones rather then a crimp. or you can get a set of male and female xt 60 plugs if you still want to be able to unplug your power wires. OR you could even just cut both plugs off and directly solder the wires and heat shrink them. BUT for now if you even just want to be able to power the controller to make sure every thing works right until you can get new plugs. You could get matching bullet connectors that would crimp on. or you can even cut off the bullet connectors strip back the wires and then fold the striped copper in half and can just shove each wire into each of the Anderson connectors. for a temporary connection.
 
Crimp on a couple yellow bullet connectors, in opposite orientation so it can't be wrongly connected, would be the simplest and most practical solution.
 
Crimp on a couple yellow bullet connectors, in opposite orientation so it can't be wrongly connected, would be the simplest and most practical solution.
Make very sure what ever connectors you use are rated from the current (amps) possible from the battery. This is controlled by the BMS in the battery pack.
 
Make very sure what ever connectors you use are rated from the current (amps) possible from the battery. This is controlled by the BMS in the battery pack.

Why is it the possible current draw from the battery? I would have though it would be the controller that would determine the current draw, in this case already fitted with bullet connectors (as per the photo) by the controller manufacturer.

A current draw exceeding the controller rating would surely suggest a dead short somewhere, and a melted battery connector is likely the least of someones problems.
 
As a general observation, I have found the power connectors on the controller side are pretty much always the weak link in the system. Wiring gauge is typically well under what I would have preferred, and bullet connectors that are typically rated up to what the system is rated to and absolutely no more. I've never felt bad about snipping them off and replacing with an XT60. If I could go all the way back to the board inside the controller and replace the wires themselves I'd happily do it.
 
As a general observation, I have found the power connectors on the controller side are pretty much always the weak link in the system. Wiring gauge is typically well under what I would have preferred, and bullet connectors that are typically rated up to what the system is rated to and absolutely no more. I've never felt bad about snipping them off and replacing with an XT60. If I could go all the way back to the board inside the controller and replace the wires themselves I'd happily do it.
I just replaced the crappy stock controller on my Vivi and I was pretty shocked to see how all the output wires were all large enough gauge wireing to handle the max amps that the controller can output. and the wires Running from the battery to the controller plug were adequate. to the to xt-60 plug. but then the short wires with the tx-60 plug on the controller itself going to the board are really thin gauge wire like 18 or maybe even 20 gauge. They are just a tiny big heavier gauge than the wires for the break lights. SMH
 
the short wires with the tx-60 plug on the controller itself going to the board are really thin gauge wire like 18 or maybe even 20 gauge. They are just a tiny big heavier gauge than the wires for the break lights. SMH
Be careful determining the amperage capacity of wire based solely on the wire gauge. It is actually the type of insulation on the wire that is the critical factor (obviously with a gauge size within reason). A silicon coated wire can carry a materially higher amperage than a PVC coated one of exactly the same gauge. It's whether the insulation will survive the operating temperature of the wire, not the core melting.
Same again for another product which has a higher again amp rating than silicon (name of the stuff escapes me). This is the stuff often used by controller manufacturers and hence why a seemingly quite slim gauge can be used. This type of wire is VERY stiff and is probably the easiest way to identify it.
 
Be careful determining the amperage capacity of wire based solely on the wire gauge. It is actually the type of insulation on the wire that is the critical factor (obviously with a gauge size within reason). A silicon coated wire can carry a materially higher amperage than a PVC coated one of exactly the same gauge. It's whether the insulation will survive the operating temperature of the wire, not the core melting.
Same again for another product which has a higher again amp rating than silicon (name of the stuff escapes me). This is the stuff often used by controller manufacturers and hence why a seemingly quite slim gauge can be used. This type of wire is VERY stiff and is probably the easiest way to identify it.
ahhhhh that might be what kind of wire they used because its definitely not have silicone insulation and its really hard and stiff wire and I don't think its pvc being it feels different than the pvc insulated wires that are on the brake/tail light accessory plug
 
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