5 Mistakes You should Never Make with an Ebike

Kayla

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When it comes to riding electric bikes, there are many things you can do, such as riding to a park to have a picnic or to the beach for the sunset. I believe for most of you guys, ebikes can lead you to a happier and more pleasant world.

However, do you really know those things you can’t do before taking your fat tire electric bikes for sale out? Since electric bikes are not regular bikes, there are still some points you need to pay attention to. So in this article, I will tell you 5 things you should never do to your ebikes. These mistakes may be easily made by ebike beginners, just stick with us.

1. Avoid washing ebikes upside down

Sometimes when you ride off-road or just on dirt or sand, your ebikes for sale will be dirty. I know it might be quite tempting to put your ebikes upside down so that you can clean your drivetrains, wheels, tires, and things like that easily, but this will possibly fill your ebikes with water. Here is the reason: normally, most ebikes are manufactured with drain holes at the bottom. You can check that on your own. One of the purposes of the hole is to allow that water to drain out naturally with gravity when you are washing your electric bikes. However, if you wash them upside down, chances are they will be filled with water and the water won’t be able to drain out naturally.

No matter how waterproof your ebikes are, this way will damage them definitely because they are just not supposed to be filled with water. Take iPhone as an example, even though your iPhone 13 is waterproof, will you put it in the water for 24 hours? Not really, right?

So what is a proper way for you to wash your ebikes? You can get yourself a hose, a bucket of water, and a brush to wash your ebikes. Some of you may choose to use a powerful jet wash, but it is absolutely improper because its strong power could wash things off like some loose ebike components.

2. Don't leave your ebike battery empty after a ride.

In fact, one of the worst things you can do for your ebike batteries is to leave them empty after a long ride. Sometimes you may forget to charge your ebikes and put them aside. It is okay if there is still 60 or 70 percent left for your battery. However, if they are empty completely, then leaving your electric bikes without charging them will definitely impact your battery's health because it will possibly make your batteries work improperly.

Therefore, before putting your ebikes in storage for months or even weeks, you can charge them back up to 60 or 70 percent, which is quite enough.

3. Leave your ebikes on charge for longer than they should be.

No matter which devices you need to charge, you may forget to unplug the chargers occasionally. This also applies to ebike charging. Sometimes you might leave your electric bikes on charge for days, even weeks. And leaving those chargers connected to your ebikes isn't a good thing at all, even though there are many smart chargers on the market, which will turn off automatically once the battery is full, This is because even if the batteries discharge only 1%, smart chargers will normally restart automatically. And the cycling will happen over and over again if you are really going to keep them charging for a long time, which will hurt the batteries as well.

To avoid this situation, you are recommended to use the timer on your cell phone and set a 4 or 5-hour timespan.

4. Never contaminate your disc brakes

It may not be easy for you to notice that, but the discs of your brakes are easily contaminated, even only touching them gently with your fingers can cause contamination. The reason for this is with contamination on discs, there may be squealing and consistent noise whenever the brakes are applied. And this will also weaken the braking force more or less. Therefore, don't get into that habit of touching them or spraying anything onto them at all. However, even though you don’t touch the discs, they will still be contaminated more or less, which means you are getting less braking force day by day.

5. Ignore the need for supplies

Some riders tend to take nothing with them when they are planning to go out for a long ride. Obviously, it is not recommended. There are always urgent situations where you need tools or spares to get you out of trouble. Moreover, when it comes to food and water, you need to take more of that than you expect. There is nothing worse than feeling hungry and dehydrated when you are riding out for a long time. And once you feel exhausted and hungry, you will lose interest in your long ride.Therefore, before your long ride, remember to prepare yourself a pannier bag that is large enough to store things needed.

There are 5 tips for you, especially for beginners. No matter what kind of rider you are, safety is always the top priority.
 

Snoop

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My emergency gear setup:

I’ve got a rear cargo bag which has a large central pouch and two smaller pouches on it’s sides.

Left pouch
Maintenance:
Small bag containing
  • 2 tire wrenches
  • Bike multi tool (wrenches, Allen wrenches, bits, etc
  • Tube abrasive tool
  • Self adhering tube patches
  • A folded up graphic with step by step basic repair steps for a dolt like me to use if I forget. :geek:
A small portable air pump with pressure gauge


I threw a small pair of snips into my maintenance pouch last night as I was walking a rear tube change through my head. With a rear hub, that requires unplugging the electric and removing a little cable tie (would need a snip).

God, I hope I never have to take the rear wheel off on the road. That would be a pain in the arse without a bike lift.

I‘m also up in the air on weather to carry my spare tube with me. The package is bigger and takes more space…..I’m thinking just the tube repair equipment should suffice.

Right pouch
First Aid:
First aid kit containing
  • Cleaning towelettes
  • Large non-adherent sterile gauze
  • Roll of gauze cling wrap
  • Bandaids
  • Neosporin
  • Tourniquet (hopefully passers by will find it to quelch my bleeding stump :oops:
  • Scissors
  • Triangle bandage
  • Tape

Big center pouch
Goodies:
Such as
  • A good book. Unless the story has a dragon in it, it probably sucks
  • Sandwich. Ham/American cheese, lettuce. Mustard squirted in diagonal runs. Not horizontal or vertical. It matters.
  • Apple
  • Beverage
  • Space to bring home cool stuff I come across, like fresh bread from the farmers market last week.
When I commute to work, my work supplies, computer, etc all go nicely in the backpack I wear.
 

Kayla

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My emergency gear setup:

I’ve got a rear cargo bag which has a large central pouch and two smaller pouches on it’s sides.

Left pouch
Maintenance:
Small bag containing
  • 2 tire wrenches
  • Bike multi tool (wrenches, Allen wrenches, bits, etc
  • Tube abrasive tool
  • Self adhering tube patches
  • A folded up graphic with step by step basic repair steps for a dolt like me to use if I forget. :geek:
A small portable air pump with pressure gauge


I threw a small pair of snips into my maintenance pouch last night as I was walking a rear tube change through my head. With a rear hub, that requires unplugging the electric and removing a little cable tie (would need a snip).

God, I hope I never have to take the rear wheel off on the road. That would be a pain in the arse without a bike lift.

I‘m also up in the air on weather to carry my spare tube with me. The package is bigger and takes more space…..I’m thinking just the tube repair equipment should suffice.

Right pouch
First Aid:
First aid kit containing
  • Cleaning towelettes
  • Large non-adherent sterile gauze
  • Roll of gauze cling wrap
  • Bandaids
  • Neosporin
  • Tourniquet (hopefully passers by will find it to quelch my bleeding stump :oops:
  • Scissors
  • Triangle bandage
  • Tape

Big center pouch
Goodies:
Such as
  • A good book. Unless the story has a dragon in it, it probably sucks
  • Sandwich. Ham/American cheese, lettuce. Mustard squirted in diagonal runs. Not horizontal or vertical. It matters.
  • Apple
  • Beverage
  • Space to bring home cool stuff I come across, like fresh bread from the farmers market last week.
When I commute to work, my work supplies, computer, etc all go nicely in the backpack I wear.
I think you are very well prepared!(y)(y)(y)
 

Kayla

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My emergency gear setup:

I’ve got a rear cargo bag which has a large central pouch and two smaller pouches on it’s sides.

Left pouch
Maintenance:
Small bag containing
  • 2 tire wrenches
  • Bike multi tool (wrenches, Allen wrenches, bits, etc
  • Tube abrasive tool
  • Self adhering tube patches
  • A folded up graphic with step by step basic repair steps for a dolt like me to use if I forget. :geek:
A small portable air pump with pressure gauge


I threw a small pair of snips into my maintenance pouch last night as I was walking a rear tube change through my head. With a rear hub, that requires unplugging the electric and removing a little cable tie (would need a snip).

God, I hope I never have to take the rear wheel off on the road. That would be a pain in the arse without a bike lift.

I‘m also up in the air on weather to carry my spare tube with me. The package is bigger and takes more space…..I’m thinking just the tube repair equipment should suffice.

Right pouch
First Aid:
First aid kit containing
  • Cleaning towelettes
  • Large non-adherent sterile gauze
  • Roll of gauze cling wrap
  • Bandaids
  • Neosporin
  • Tourniquet (hopefully passers by will find it to quelch my bleeding stump :oops:
  • Scissors
  • Triangle bandage
  • Tape

Big center pouch
Goodies:
Such as
  • A good book. Unless the story has a dragon in it, it probably sucks
  • Sandwich. Ham/American cheese, lettuce. Mustard squirted in diagonal runs. Not horizontal or vertical. It matters.
  • Apple
  • Beverage
  • Space to bring home cool stuff I come across, like fresh bread from the farmers market last week.
When I commute to work, my work supplies, computer, etc all go nicely in the backpack I wear.
By the way, i think you'd better check your cargo bag regularly to prevent aging or any damage from riding. You could buy a backup rear bag for exchange. I have got three Magicycle rear bags with different style, that can set my mind at more rest when riding...haha
 

Yogaduke

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I would add never mess with your chain or derailleur when it is on. Bad things can happen fast.
 

CloneWerks

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I also carry a laminated I.C.E. (in case of emergency) card that lists my name, blood type, allergies, and two emergency contact phone numbers.
additionally, One can never overstate the usefulness of a bandanna, or small hand towel and a handful of zip-ties.

Ages ago I actually managed to finish a ride (about 4 miles left) by covering a hole with a folded dollar bill and compressing everything with zip ties until I could re-inflate the tire.
 

Jeffb

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I'm confused about washing my bike upside down. Sure there might be drain holes but they can get filled up with mud. I'm assuming most people will turn their bikes back rite side up thus allowing the water to drain back out right? There is nothing worse than having that cavity fill with mud and gook. If the weep holes get clogged then all the accumulated crud will cause alot of damage. Every one with a ebike needs to invert their bike to inspect and clean out the holes. But most electronic cavities are fully sealed anyway.
 

CloneWerks

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I'm confused about washing my bike upside down. Sure there might be drain holes but they can get filled up with mud. I'm assuming most people will turn their bikes back rite side up thus allowing the water to drain back out right? There is nothing worse than having that cavity fill with mud and gook. If the weep holes get clogged then all the accumulated crud will cause alot of damage. Every one with a ebike needs to invert their bike to inspect and clean out the holes. But most electronic cavities are fully sealed anyway.
The way things are designed on an eBike is with the notion that they will get splashed upon (or rained upon) and then everything will drain down. Yes everything should be watertight. But no, you can't take that as gospel (believe me, I'm in the R/C hobby, I know of what I speak)
 

brettchallenger

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I think the author overstates the delicacy of brake discs. Yes, you should avoid contimination (especially with spray greases etc) but simply touching one, unless you have a very dirty, greasy, oily finger isn't going to to much harm and the natural oils on your skin will quickly disappear after the first application of the brakes. What you do need to watch out for, is the much poorer intitial braking you will get after inserting new pads - until they have bedded in.
 

CloneWerks

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I think the author overstates the delicacy of brake discs. Yes, you should avoid contimination (especially with spray greases etc) but simply touching one, unless you have a very dirty, greasy, oily finger isn't going to to much harm and the natural oils on your skin will quickly disappear after the first application of the brakes. What you do need to watch out for, is the much poorer intitial braking you will get after inserting new pads - until they have bedded in.
Funny little story. It's a "known thing" that redheads have perspiration and skin oils that are significantly more corrosive than non-redheads. I have left pretty significant fingerprints and rust spots on tools, firearms, brass railings, and brake rotors by touching them and not wiping them down after. The next day... rust and rusty fingerprints. It's pretty wild.
 

ronniebellie

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When it comes to riding electric bikes, there are many things you can do, such as riding to a park to have a picnic or to the beach for the sunset. I believe for most of you guys, ebikes can lead you to a happier and more pleasant world.

However, do you really know those things you can’t do before taking your fat tire electric bikes for sale out? Since electric bikes are not regular bikes, there are still some points you need to pay attention to. So in this article, I will tell you 5 things you should never do to your ebikes. These mistakes may be easily made by ebike beginners, just stick with us.

1. Avoid washing ebikes upside down

Sometimes when you ride off-road or just on dirt or sand, your ebikes for sale will be dirty. I know it might be quite tempting to put your ebikes upside down so that you can clean your drivetrains, wheels, tires, and things like that easily, but this will possibly fill your ebikes with water. Here is the reason: normally, most ebikes are manufactured with drain holes at the bottom. You can check that on your own. One of the purposes of the hole is to allow that water to drain out naturally with gravity when you are washing your electric bikes. However, if you wash them upside down, chances are they will be filled with water and the water won’t be able to drain out naturally.

No matter how waterproof your ebikes are, this way will damage them definitely because they are just not supposed to be filled with water. Take iPhone as an example, even though your iPhone 13 is waterproof, will you put it in the water for 24 hours? Not really, right?

So what is a proper way for you to wash your ebikes? You can get yourself a hose, a bucket of water, and a brush to wash your ebikes. Some of you may choose to use a powerful jet wash, but it is absolutely improper because its strong power could wash things off like some loose ebike components.

2. Don't leave your ebike battery empty after a ride.

In fact, one of the worst things you can do for your ebike batteries is to leave them empty after a long ride. Sometimes you may forget to charge your ebikes and put them aside. It is okay if there is still 60 or 70 percent left for your battery. However, if they are empty completely, then leaving your electric bikes without charging them will definitely impact your battery's health because it will possibly make your batteries work improperly.

Therefore, before putting your ebikes in storage for months or even weeks, you can charge them back up to 60 or 70 percent, which is quite enough.

3. Leave your ebikes on charge for longer than they should be.

No matter which devices you need to charge, you may forget to unplug the chargers occasionally. This also applies to ebike charging. Sometimes you might leave your electric bikes on charge for days, even weeks. And leaving those chargers connected to your ebikes isn't a good thing at all, even though there are many smart chargers on the market, which will turn off automatically once the battery is full, This is because even if the batteries discharge only 1%, smart chargers will normally restart automatically. And the cycling will happen over and over again if you are really going to keep them charging for a long time, which will hurt the batteries as well.

To avoid this situation, you are recommended to use the timer on your cell phone and set a 4 or 5-hour timespan.

4. Never contaminate your disc brakes

It may not be easy for you to notice that, but the discs of your brakes are easily contaminated, even only touching them gently with your fingers can cause contamination. The reason for this is with contamination on discs, there may be squealing and consistent noise whenever the brakes are applied. And this will also weaken the braking force more or less. Therefore, don't get into that habit of touching them or spraying anything onto them at all. However, even though you don’t touch the discs, they will still be contaminated more or less, which means you are getting less braking force day by day.

5. Ignore the need for supplies

Some riders tend to take nothing with them when they are planning to go out for a long ride. Obviously, it is not recommended. There are always urgent situations where you need tools or spares to get you out of trouble. Moreover, when it comes to food and water, you need to take more of that than you expect. There is nothing worse than feeling hungry and dehydrated when you are riding out for a long time. And once you feel exhausted and hungry, you will lose interest in your long ride.Therefore, before your long ride, remember to prepare yourself a pannier bag that is large enough to store things needed.

There are 5 tips for you, especially for beginners. No matter what kind of rider you are, safety is always the top priority.
Very good points. Thank you. However, the iPhone is not water proof, but water resistant which is different. The newest models, the iPhone 12 and 13, can withstand water up to a depth of six meters for up to 30 minutes. They can hold up against splashes, rain, and accidental water exposure, but intentional water exposure should still be avoided if possible. (Source)
 

brettchallenger

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Funny little story. It's a "known thing" that redheads have perspiration and skin oils that are significantly more corrosive than non-redheads. I have left pretty significant fingerprints and rust spots on tools, firearms, brass railings, and brake rotors by touching them and not wiping them down after. The next day... rust and rusty fingerprints. It's pretty wild.
That's where your red hair comes from - it's rust!
 
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