$10,000.00??

leehop71

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I belong to another thread and someone posted a concern with a flaw on a new e-bike they purchased.

The bike cost the purchaser $10,000.00!!!

I know everyone’s budget is different but even if I were in a position where money was no object, I don’t see myself spending anywhere CLOSE to 5 figures for an electric bike!!

Yes, yes, I know all the to each his own sentiments but $10,000.00 for an electric bicycle?!?!?
 
Probably a carbon fiber Levo model of some sort. Or a carbon fiber frame bike of some sorts. Let me guess the frame cracked.
 
I come more from a motorcycle background. From a motorcycle perspective $10,000 isn't all that much, especially if you were into Harleys. I bought this bike, my first eBike, in 2013 for $9995 shipped. I ride it like a motorcycle, and also like an eBike. That makes it a lot more versatile than most eBikes, or motorcycles, because I can ride it virtually anywhere.
Electronaut 2024.jpg
 
I come more from a motorcycle background. From a motorcycle perspective $10,000 isn't all that much, especially if you were into Harleys. I bought this bike, my first eBike, in 2013 for $9995 shipped. I ride it like a motorcycle, and also like an eBike. That makes it a lot more versatile than most eBikes, or motorcycles, because I can ride it virtually anywhere. View attachment 14199

@biknut Is that a ThatsDax pirate sticker front by forks..
 
I think everyone has a "peak price" they will pay. My first bike was about 1500. My wife's bike was around 900. My second bike was around 3350, so (for now), 3350 is my breaking point. I don't see another eBike appearing on the scope. It would have to be faster than 45 MPH, have more than 45 AH capacity at 60 V. Front and rear suspension, rear rack, headlamp, brake light, running light, front and rear turn signals.. and the usual useless horn.

I don't have to load my bikes on a bus/train, nor carry them up steps. So very light carbon fiber bikes are not worth the squeeze for me. I also tend to go high wattage on my eBikes (2Kw and up), which does not play well with most carbon fiber frames.

I will admit most my eBike purchases have been based upon Maslov's Hierarchy of "I so want that".
 
I come more from a motorcycle background. From a motorcycle perspective $10,000 isn't all that much, especially if you were into Harleys. I bought this bike, my first eBike, in 2013 for $9995 shipped. I ride it like a motorcycle, and also like an eBike. That makes it a lot more versatile than most eBikes, or motorcycles, because I can ride it virtually anywhere. View attachment 14199
Nearly 10k for a direct drive hub motor, seriously!
 
Nearly 10k for a direct drive hub motor, seriously!
It was 9 years before the first serious mechanical failure, which was actually electric in nature. It's been the most dependable bike I've ever owned by a huge margin. Even to this day it would be hard to find a better eBike.
 
To each their own......my neighbor has a RAM truck that he paid near $75K for......I have a RAM truck that I paid $39K for......his truck has a lot more crap on it then my truck......my truck can tow more weight.....just depends on what you want or need.
 
It all depends on your perspective. As biknut pointed out, coming from a motorcycle background, it's not uncommon for a nice new motorcycle to cost > $25k. I paid close to that once for my Yamaha FJR1300A, but that was a bike that would go 85 mph, all day two up while fully loaded with luggage. No chain maintenance, either; just clean and grease the drive splines and change the final drive oil every rear tire change.

Now I'm in to road cycling, a low-end entry level bike is $1100 and the lighter, more aero pro bikes exceed $14k. For a mechanical bike, I reason that before we start to pay hundreds or thousands of dollars to save a few ounces here and there, we should look at the engine, so I went with a $1600 model, and told myself if I lose the 30 pounds so that losing 5-8 lbs. on the bike matters, I will treat myself to a lighter, nicer bike.

As with all things, it becomes a case of diminishing returns, but with eBikes, spending money in certain areas gives noticeable returns:
  • Good tires make the whole riding experience nicer, whether it's because they stick better leaned over, sipe water better in the rain, dig into loose gravel better, or just roll with less resistance. A good set of tires can cost $100 more than a cheap tire that is just black & round.
  • Good battery technology makes a difference too. Better cells are safer, more energy-dense and more consistent. Better battery pack design is also safer and will lead to longer battery life. Higher voltage and higher capacity also costs more, but gives tangibly better performance. (trading off against weight)
  • A good saddle costs twice as much as a bad one and gives an immediately noticeable better riding experience.
  • Good brakes are quieter, which is nicer for everyone, unless you're using them to announce your high-speed approach on the MUP! ;-) They're probably safer too.
  • A good motor can be more powerful, more efficient and more reliable. Some of the bigger eMoped hub motors use metal planetary gears for longer life. Some are even helical cut, to reduce the commensurately higher noise. Go up to a $10k bike like biknuts and you get a centrally-mounted motor, which gives better balance and also a much nicer gearbox. Hub motor bikes are almost always less expensive and rear-heavy, which matters when jumping or when loading the bike on a rack.
My cost journey and buying rationale went like this:

- 1st eBike: heybike Ranger @ $1400 at the time. (I think they're about $1k now) I wanted cast wheels, folding design Class 3 power and at least 30 miles in range. The bike was too heavy for the foldability to be of much use and had poor quality brakes that screeched loudly all the time. This one's gone now. Too little quality, too much weight and bulk.
- 2nd eBike: Lectric XP Lite @ $800. This one weighs half as much as the Ranger so it's actually portable and has better quality brakes, but only a single mechanical gear. This was probably my best buy.
- 3rd eBike: Aventon Level.2 @ $2100. (they're $1800 or something now!) I wanted something that rolled easier than the Ranger and XP Lite, so I could reasonably pedal it like a regular bike. This was also a great buy and is probably my favorite bike overall. Great quality brakes, tires, battery, motor, and electronics. Worth every penny.
- 4th eBike: Electra Townie GO! 7D @ $1800. It's a cruiser for my wife. She loves it. It rolls easily and has a good gearing range. Can easily be pedaled without power and "only" weighs 50 lbs. A good buy.
- 5th eBike: Juiced HyperScrambler2 @ $2500. This one has a lot more power and speed. (also weight; it's 120 lbs!) For all intents and purposes, it's a moped. Pedaling it is a bear. Quality is not quite as nice as the Aventon and batteries are not to be found from Juiced, except a couple times per year. I find myself not riding it as much, even though it's the fastest and easiest to ride. Rear suspension is not well chosen; it's sprung too stiffly for all but the heaviest riders.
- 6th eBike: Ride1UP Portola @ $1000. I wanted to add another folder so I could throw two of them in the back of my CR-V and make a day of it with my wife or daughter. Nice little bike, but the display is not well-sorted like on my other bikes. It's about 10 lbs. lighter than the Ranger, so still a bear to load and unload. I hurt my back a little each time. It's more well thought-out than the Ranger: 3" tires instead of 4", narrower bars, etc.

BOTTOM LINE: I MAY spend more than $2k again in the future, but one can get a quality eBike for $1-2k. If you want the best of the best, you're going to pay 500% more for that last 15% in quality. I think I would like a fancier commuter some day. I'll pay extra to keep good component quality like the Aventon has, but I would also like belt drive and an internal geared hub or Pinion gearbox to make it cleaner and less maintenance-intensive.
 
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